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CONTENTS. 

EDITORIALS- 
TRADE HOTES. 
CORRESPONDENCE. 
OFFICIAL MATTER. 

REFERENDUM VOTE ON 
AMENDMENTS TO THE 
CONSTITUTION. 



ORGANIZATION 



Si 



OFFICIAL-PAPER -OF -THE -C-M-I-U-OF 
PUBLISHED .MONTHLY- AT- CHICAGO.MLL 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



Cfar Makers' Official Journal 

ISSUED MONTHLY ' 

G. W. PERKINS, Editor and Publisher 



fc<j.T-HíWí«w-i'j:;'Un 



^^açaaBjïS^'^ 



100 



EnUred as Second-Class Matter^ Nov. £8, 1894, ot the Post 

Office at Chicago, III., under Act of March 5, J 879. 

Subscripiion Price Jl .00 per year. Single copies ten cents. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 



JANUARY IS, 1913. 



±=¿ 



All amendments proposed by the Balti- 
more Convention that were ratified by pop- 
ular vote become operative January 1. 

All amendments adopted by the Balti- 
more Convention were ratified by popular 
vote except the amendment to Section 64 
creating half-dues and half-benefits, known 
as Class A, the amendment to Section 64 
to strike the optional clause reference 
bunch breakers and rollers from the Con- 
stitution, and the amendment to Section 
146 extending the time for the payment of 
death benefits. 



The British-American Tobacco Com- 
pany, formerly a subsidiary of the Amer- 
ican Tobacco Company, 
A Gigantic has pursued its career 

Corporation. undisturbed by the de- 

cisions of the American 
. Supreme Court. With 
headquarters in London, and chartered un- 
der the British Limited Liability Act, it is 
again invading the United States, by the 
formation of new corporations. Its latest 
venture is the British-American Cigar 
Stores Company, with offices in New York 
City, and capitalized at three million dol- 
lars. 

There is nothing in the decision of the 
Supreme Court of the United States dis- 
solving the American Tobacco Company, 
which prevents the British-American To- 
bacco Company from creating new corpo- 
rations and developing a new monopoly 
in the tobacco industry. Besides this, it is 
amply protected by treaty rights which 
accord British citizens the s.ame rights and 
privileges in business as American citizens. 
James B. Duke, the former president of 
the American Tobacco Company, is now 
president of the British-American Tobacco 
Company, with headquarters in London, 
England, directing its operatipns over the 
whole globe. 

Prior to the decision of the Supreme 
Court, which practically decreed the reor- 



ganization of the' American Tobacco Com- 
pany, there was a tacit understanding be- 
tween the two trusts, which divided the 
whole world into two business territorî-s, 
thus eliminating competition, costly adver- 
tising and the soliciting of business. This 
division of territory was agreed to after 
a severe fight, and at an expense of many 
million dollars to the American Tobacco 
Company and to its rival in Great Britain. 

With the assistance of Attorney-General 
Wickersham as a pliant tool, the attorneys 
of the Tobacco Trusts practically dictated 
the reorganization plan, which left the com- 
bination of the American and British To- 
bacco Trusts intact the same as prior to 
the issuance of the decree of the Supreme 
Court. The whole judicial force ended in 
a change of bookkeeping and the issuance 
of new shares.' 

To what extent the business of the Brit- 
ish-American Tobacco Company will be 
developed in the United States; whether 
it will embarïc into the retail trade, as the 
name of the new corporation indicates, is 
at present mere speculation. It has not 
revealed its future plans; nor has it taken 
the public into confidence. We shall wait 
and see. That it will revert to its old tac- 
tics in a modified form is beyond doubt. 
The leopard does not change his spots; 
neither will James B. Duke and his con- 
federates change their past policy. They 
are developing a new monopoly that will 
outstrip all past performances, with world- 
wide ramifications. 

As now constituted the British-American 
Tobacco Company, Ltd., controls through 
ownership of all or a majority of the cap- 
ital stock, or through subsidiaries, the fol- 
lowing companies engaged in the business 
of manufacturing or selling Tobacco and 
its products: 

American Tobacco Co, of Canada, Ltd., Mon- 
trsal Canada 

American Tobacco Co.. Aktleaelakab, Copenr 
hagren, Denmark. ^ ^^^ 

British- American Tobacco Co. (Ceylon), Ltd.. 
Colombo, Ceylon. _ 

Emile Boussard, delete Anonyme, Brussels. 
Belgium. 

Nva Aktiebolag Cigaret tf abri ken Orient, 
Stockholm. Sweden. 

George A. Jasmatzl, Dresden. Germany. 

British Cigarette Co., Ltd., Shanghai. China. 

British-American Tobacco Co. (India), Ltd., 
Calcutta. India. 

Mustard & Co.. Shanghai, China. 

United Tobacco Co., Ltd., London, Kngland. 

United Tobacco Co. (North), Ltd.. Transvaal. 
Africa 

United Tobacco Co. (South). Ltd.. Cape Town, 
South Africa. 

Maspero Frères, Ltd., Cairo, Egypt. 

Jamaica Tobacco Co., Kingston, Jamaica. 

Peninsular Tobacco Co., Ltd., Karachi, India. 

W. S. Mathews & Sons Co., Louisville. Ky. 

T. C. Williams Co., Petersburg, Va. 

David Dunlop. Petersburg, Va. 

The capital stock of the British-Amer- 



CIGAR MAKEBS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



¡can Tobacco Company is ample for all 
purposes. When fresh capital is needed 
for the transaction of its business,, new 
shares are issued, which fínd a ready mar- 
ket. It has issued stock valued at eleven 
mülion pounds of sterling, of which six 
and a half million are preferred shares, 
and four and a half million in common 
shares. The par value of one share is a 
pound sterling. For the first nine months 
in 1912 it has paid eighteen and one-half 
per cent dividends on the common shares. 

After the so-called dissolution and re- 
organization, said an attorney at law: "The 
independent manufacturers in the tobacco 
trade had to meet the competitive attacks 
of but one Trust, whereas today they have 
to meet four separate antagonists of for- 
midable size and power, all of whom come 
into the same territory and attack the trade 
of the independents at the same time." 

With the coming of the British-Amer- 
ican Tobacco Company into the territory 
of the United States, another Trust will 
be added to the four. Nominally they are 
divided into five different Trusts competing 
for the same trade; but in reality it is the 
old American Tobacco Company, con- 
trolled by the same sharehojders as here- 
tofore. The leopard has not changed his 
spots! 

In this issue of the Official Journal we 
publish a detailed vote ^ of local unions on 
nine of the amendments adopted by the 
Baltimore Convention and submitted to 
popular vote, and the total aggregate vote 
on all of the amendments. All the amend- 
ments submitted by the Convention were 
ratified by popular vote except the amend- 
ment in Section 64, known as the Class A 
plan, creating a half-dues and half-benefits 
class; and the amendment to Section 64 
striking out of the Constitution the op- 
tional clause permitting local unions to ac- 
cept or reject bunch breakers and rollers; 
and to Section 146 in reference to the pay- 
ment of death benefit, that is to amend by 
strHcing out the $200 for five years' mem- 
bership, $350 for ten years' membership, 
and $550 for fifteen years' membership, 
and inserting $200 for eight years* member- 
ship, $350 for fifteen years' membership and 
$550 for twenty years' membership. 

The detailed vote of each local union on 
the amendments will be printed on a sep- 
arate sheet and one sent to each local 
union for verification. 

The aggregate vote on the resolutions, 
all of which have been adopted, will be. 



published in the February issue of the 
Journal. 



The conditions of trade have an upward 
tendency. After years of depression in some 

trade centers, especially in 
Trade . the metropolitan districts 

Statistics. of Greater New York, nor- 

mal trade conditions are 
prevailing to some extent Prior to the holi- 
days trade appeared to be brisk; the oppor- 
tunities for work were ample. The chances 
for work during the last four months of 1912 
showed a remarkable improvement in com- 
parison with former years. An exception to 
this rule obtained in a few districts, where 
the volume of trade has been a losing proposi* 
tion for years. The mistakes of the past, in 
ignoring competitive conditions in the forma- 
tion of scales of prices, is bearing its deadly 
fruit. By clinging to mistakes with a tenacity 
worthy of a better cause, the avenues to es- 
cape appear to be blocked. Decay and ulti- 
mate death can only be avoided by heroic 
treatment. The cancerous growth, which is 
eating up the vitals, has to be removed be- 
fore normal functions can be resumed. By 
removing the causes, which have retarded the 
growth and destroyed the vitality of the trade, 
healthy conditions can be restored. Evils, 
whether of our own making or of somebody 
else, which have kept in the trade steadily, 
like a thief in the night cannot be removed 
in a day nor in a month. The remedy cannot 
be applied without a complete and careful 
investigation of all facts in the case. 

The tptal production of cigars, weighing 
more than three pounds per 1,000, for the 
month of November, 1912, amounted to 673,- 
301,683. For the corresponding month in 
1911, taxes were paid for 662,679,237; showing 
an increase of 10,622,446 cigars, as compared 
with the same month of the former year. 

The districts which have benefited from 
the expansion of the industry are the 9th 
Pennsylvania, 2nd New York, 2nd Virginia, 
Florida, 1st Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, 
and others. The heaviest losses were in the 
5th New Jersey, 14th New York and others 
in smaller proportion. 

The production of small cigars, weighing 
less than three pounds per 1,000, amounted to 
82,367,200. For the corresponding month in 
1911 taxes werf: paid for 83,476,000; showing 
a decrease of 1,099,800 small cigars. The 
production of cigarettes, however, has in- 
creased in one single month in the amount 
of 283,887,573, which is unusual and indicates 
an enormous growth in that branch of the 
industry. 

For more information we publish the de- 






CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



tailed repqrts from the various revenue dis- 
tricts, which, though incomplete, contain some 
valuable data for study and comparison. 
Month of Novomber. 

1913. 1911. IncrBMB or 

Decrease.* 

Arkansu lEE.SOO S.SSO* 

ColirorDla lat... 4,24«,6SO 138,300* 

Callfani[a «th.., ■ ■■■■■■■■: 

Colorado Iî4,ao0 

Connecticut . . . 891,81T 

Florida Z,E6T.ZE3 

Qeorgla. 24*,!flO' 

IlUnol» 1« "Ě-SSí 

mmol» 6th 5î5'S?î 

minolB SIh i"'îîi 

Illinois 13th.... "J'S*S 

Indiana 6th . ^SĚ-SíS 

Indiana 7th (.433,617 

Iowa 3rd ^E'Î^S 

Iowa «h. 15MS9 

Kansas 361,624 

Kentucky 2nd.. ?1'S*S» 

Kentucky Bth.,. 46,207* 

Kentucky 6th... "SJí!* 

Kentucky 7th... 86,600 

Kentucky 8th... S-WO* 

Maryland ""-äiS 

MaasachuaettS . 8B7.S33 

Mlchlsan Ist... 70S,EO7 

Michigan 4th... 811,2T7 

Minnesota 668,873 

Missouri 1st.... 1"'*SS 

Missouri «th.... 617,600 

Nebraska 11,I20> 

New Hampshira 1,061,867 

New Jersey Ist S88,«73* 

New Jereay 6th B.710,6S7* 

Now Mexico 11,080 

New York lat.. 90,020 

New York 2nd.. Í. 708,840 

New York 3rd.. 161.140 

New York 14lh. 1,487,139* 

New York Zlat. 27,660 

New York 28th. 66.169' 

No Carolina 5th 1.960 

No. ft Bto. Dak. 283,176 

Ohio 1st 381,683* 

Ohio 10th 

Ohio nth 274,490 

Ohio 18th 30,840 

GreKOn 50,930 

Penna'Wnla 1st 2,3io,B70 

Penns'lT-nla 9th 11,898,070 

Tenneaaec 2,050 

Texas Srd 334,867 

Virginia !nd.... 3,094,110 

Vírenla eth,... 407,924* 

Waahlnslon ... 19,676 

Wisconsin lal.. 722.920 

Wlsconaln 2nd.. 112,750 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 

The trades union movement, as a great 
moral force, is an indispensable factor in the 
social and economic life of the country. By 
securins: higher wages and shorter hours the 
home conditions of the family have been ma- 
terially improved; ihc moral lone in the edu- 
cation of the children elevated, and the finer 
instincts of the character developed. 

Poverty is the root and source of many 
evils which afflict the social life of the com- 
munity; its degradint; and demoralizing in- 
fluence is plainly visible in the lower strata 
of life in the slums of our overcrowded cities. 
All conditions prevaiüng in the slums tend to 



develop and encourage the baser instincts; lo 
instill despair and to destroy hope. 

Attorney-General Wick er sham has refused 
to prosecute the directors of the Standard Oil 
Company and of the American Tobacco Com- 
pany, adjudged guilty by the Supreme Court 
of the United States of the violation of one 
section in the Anti-Trust law which consti- 
tutes a criminal otfense. The law should be 
applied, if justice is to prevail, to rich and 
poor alike. 

There are now pending in the Senate of the 
United States five laws passed by the House 
of Representatives at the last session: The 
Clayton Ant ¡-In junction and Contempt bill, 
the Sulzcr Department of Labor bill, the 
Booker Convict Labor bill, the Seamen's Pro- 
tective bill and provisions for improvement 
in the service of the Bureau of Mines. By 
writing an urgent letter to your Senators it 
may help to pass the laws. Be up and doing I 

There is pending in the House of Repre- 
sentatives for action a bill which was passed 
by the U. S. Senate during the last session 
known as the compensation bill for work- 
men engaged in interstate transportation. 



The House of Representatives, prior to the 
adjournment for the holiday recess in De- 
cember, 1912, passed the Burnett immigration 
bill. The object of this act is to exclude from 
the United States alien immigrants over six- 
teen years of age who are unable to read 
their own language or dialect. Exemption is 
made of persons who come to the United 
States to escape religious persecution. The 
bill to be in force four months after receiving 



The protection of the lives and limbs of 
the working classes, in the handling of dan- 
gerous machinery, is of more importance to 
the social welfare of the nation than the ac- 
cumulation of wealth and the protection of 
property. 

Activity is the secret of success in ihe en- 
deavor to organize the nonunion men and 
women. Faith in the ultimate success is half 
of the battle gained ; it is hard work which 
will accomplish results. 

The New York State law limiting the hours 
of labor of women in faciories to ten per day 
and not exceeding fifty-four hours per 
week, which became operative on October 1, 
1912, was conte'sted by the candy manufac- 
turers of Brooklyn on constitutional grounds. 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



The district attorney in defending the law in 
the Supreme Court pleaded that "the over- 
work of women saps the vitality of the race." 

♦ 4c ♦ 

The laboring classes have the power to 
reduce the cost of living by co-operation in 
the purchase and distribution of the food sup- 
plies. By purchasing directly from the pro- 
ducer the exorbitant profíts of the middlemen 
can be reduced and eliminated. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The trades union movement is the militant 
organization of the working classes ; it is alive 
and energetic in combatting injustice, oppres- 
sion and unfair dealing. It is opposed to in- 
dustrial conditions which have a tendency to 
undermine the home, to lower the American 
standard of living, to increase the hours of 
labor over eight per day, and to employ young 
persons and children in trades detrimental to 
the development of their physical and mental 
wellbeing. 

4c * ♦ 

Long . hours of labor have a tendency to 
shorten the span of life rightfully belonging 
to man; to retard his mental development by 
a lack of time required for study and obser- 
vation. Long hours of labor indicate a low 
standard of civilization in all phases of human 

life. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Senator La Follette has introduced a bill 
which aims at regulating the hours of labor 
of women employed in the District of Co- 
lumbia. It provides for an eight-hour day, 
not exceeding forty-eight hours in one week. 
To enforce the law three inspectors are to 
be appointed by the District Commissioners. 

« 4c If 

« 

The advocates of the general strike, em- 
bracing one industry, and if necessary all in- 
dustries, ignore the important fact that the 
lockout has been one of the most potent weap- 
ons of manufacturers' associations^ to starve 
workingmen and women into submission. 
The general strike in one or more industries 
would, to all practical purposes, have the same 
eflPect as the lockout. It would, at the same 
time, relieve employers' associations of the 
odium in resorting to the harsh measure of 
trying to gain a point by the inhuman process 
of slow starvation. The advocates of the 
general strike are, to say the least, poor and 
incompetent leaders. 

♦ * ♦ 

The American trades union movement sym- 
pathizes with the members of the Bridgemen's 
and Structural Iron Workers' International 
Union. This is an hour of trial for men and 
it requires men with clear heads and stout 
hearts, determined and ready to build up the 



organization with strong ñnancial resources 
and a chain of benefits. With a just cause, 
we predict, it will triumphantly emerge out 
of its trials and tribulations. 

1^ 1^ * 

Modern civilization is built upon a structure 
of industrial development, in which the ac- 
cumulation of wealth by individuals plays the 
most prominent part. The welfare of the peo- 
ple creating this surplus wealth is ignored in 
the transaction; a fair remuneration for serv- 
ices rendered should be the first considera- 
tion. The trades union movement endeavors 
to fill the gap by creating a public sentiment 
favorable to the rights of the worker and pro- 
ducer. The trend of events indicates a healthy 
progress for a better and more equitable 
distribution of the wealth produced by labor. 

♦ * * 

At the forty-fifth annual Trades Union Con- 
gress of Great Britain, held at Newport, Eng- 
land, resolutions were adopted against com- 
pulsory arbitration in trade disputes, against 
the organization of industrial unions and 
against legalizing of trade agreements. The 
congress consisted of 502 delegates represent- 
ing 1,964,000 members. 



TRADE NOTES. 



The cigar manufacturers of Manila have 
requested the officials of the government to 
establish in the public schools for children 
cigarmaking as a regular course in the educa- 
tional system of the Philippine Islands. The 
manufacturers are anxious to employ cheap 

child labor. 

1^ 1^ * 

The Tobacco Products Company, a corpo- 
ration recently chartered by the State of Vir- 
ginia, has increased its preferred shares from 
eight to ten million dollars. The total capital 
is twenty million dollars. 

♦ * 4> 

A. B. Smith & Co., manufacturers of cigars 
in Boston, Mass., recently filed bankruptcy 
petition in the Federal Court of that city. 
The total liabilities of the firm aggregate 
$37,887, while their' assets are estimated at 
$23,079. The firm was financially embarrassed. 

1^ * * 

Bankruptcy proceedings were filed in the 
New York Federal Court against Alonzo B. 
Pandoz & Co. by the attorneys for the cred- 
itors. The total sum involved amounts to 
about $15,000. The assets are supposed to 
be sufficient to cover the liabilities. 

* 4> 4> 

The shade-grown tobacco planted in Porto 
Rico is estimated to cover approximately 4,500 



CIGAB MAKERS^ OFFICIAL JOUBNAL 



acres, which is considerably in excess of last 

year's planting. 

* * * 

The British-American Tobacco Company 
has declared a ñnal dividend of 8 per cent on 
common shares for the year ending Septem- 
ber 80, 1912, and payable January 7, 1918. 
The net profits of this company for the year, 
after deducting all charges and expenses, were 
$9,588,809.56, against $8,014,439.20 for the pre- 
vious year. . The company states that while 
the earnings justify a larger dividend the di- 
rectors prefer to adopt a conservative policy. 

* * * 

The exports of cigars from Havana to 
foreign countries from January 1 to Decem- 
ber 1, 1912, amounted to 161,330,221. For 
the corresponding period in 1911 the amount 
of cigars shipped was 173,229,217. This shows 
a decrease of 11,968,996 cigars as compared 
with the former period. The United States 
and Great Britain are the largest consumers 
of cigars exported from Cuba. 

* * * 

The British- American Cigar Stores Com- 
pany, capitalized at three million dollars» have 
started an office in New York City. The 
British-American Tobacco Company, of which 
James B. Duke is president, has the principal 
office in London, England. 

* * >K 

The report of the Census Bureau of the 
government, issued recently in accordance 
with a law passed at the last session of Con- 
gress, shows that the following amounts of 
leaf tobacco suitable for making cigars were 
on hand on October 1, 1912: • 

New England, including 

Connecticut 43,777,427 

New York 5,238,871 

Pennsylvania 118,782,280 

Ohi© 89,575,075 

Wisconsin 71,167,148 

Georgia and Florida 7,676,950 

Porto Rico 2,942,421 

Imported Types 41,34T,631 

Total 1 ,047,404,560 

* 4c 4> 

In the Philippines almost everybody uses 
tobacco, but mostly in the form of cigarettes, 
of which the phenomenal quantity of 4,404,- 
929,808 were consumed in the fiscal year 1912 
by a population of some 7,000,000 inhabitants. 
This makes an average yearly consumption of 
625 cigarettes for every man, woman and 
child. 

* >K * 

The production of cigars in the internal 
revenue district of Florida, for which taxes 
were paid in the month of November, 1912, 



amounted to 88,153,773. For the correspond- 
ing month in 1911 taxes were paid for 35,- 
596,520. This shows an increase of 2,557,253 
cigars, as compared with the same month of 

the former year^ 

♦ * ♦ 

The American Ggar Company declared a 
quarterly dividend of one and a half per cent 
on the preferred stock, payable on January 

2, 1913. 

* * * 

The first shipment of cigars from Cuba, 
bearing the official stamp of the Cuban Re- 
public, arrived recently in the United States. 
This guarantees that all cigars bearing the 
official stamp have actually been made in that 

island. 

* * ♦ 

The total tobacco production in the United 
States in 1912 is 962,855,000 pounds; in 1911 
it was 905,109,000 pounds, and in 1910 it was 
1,108,415,000. This is a decrease for 1912 of 
140,560,000 pounds as compared with 1910. 

The cigar factory of Allen & Dunning, 
Paterson, N. J., was destroyed by fire last 
month. The fire started in a department store 
several doors away, which was a three-story 
building. This firm is one of the oldest 
manufacturing firms in the state. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Royal E. Cabell, Commissioner of Inter- 
nal Revenue at Washington, D. C, has issued 
the following instructions to internal reve- 
nue collectors: 

"On and after January 1, 1913, inserts of 
no redemption value packed in statutory pack- 
ages of tobadco, snuff, cigars and cigarettes 
of the same size and of the same brand shall 
be of equal cost to the manufacturer. Such 
slight changes in design and appearance as 
are consequent upon the use of a series of 
flags, birds, base ball players, etc., are not 
prohibited provided the cost to the manufac- 
turer of the inserts used is the same." 

"Where a manufacturer packs inserts in 
statutory packages some of which cost the 
manufacturer more or less than other inserts 
used in the same sized statutory packages 
of the same brand, such action constitutes a 
clear violation of Section 3394 of the Revised 
Statutes as amended, the character of insert 
distributed to or received by the purchaser 
in such case depending upon the event of a 
lottery." 

"Where inserts or coupons possessing re- 
demption value are used the equality or in- 
equality of such redemption value determines 
whether or not the statute referred to has 
been violated; in the use of inserts of no re- 
demption value the equality or inequality of 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



the cost to the manufacturer is the deter- 
mining factor." 

« 41 4( . 

In the report of the Census Bureau, re- 
garding the amount of leaf tobacco- on hand 
October 1, 1912, the question of shrinkage 
is thoroughly discussed. The present report 
is not a revision of the fírst edition, but mere- 
ly an analysis and explanation of the former 
report. They admit the possibility of errors 
where estimated weights were given instead 
of actual weights. The preliminary report 
stated that on that date there were 1,047,000,- 
000 pounds in the various factories and ware- 
houses while the present report fíxes the fig- 
ure at 954,000,000 pounds. 

* ŇÍ ŇÍ 

t 

Exports of domestic leaf for the ten 
months of the calendar year ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1912, amounted to 353,549,733 
pounds, and when compared with 317,885,- 
824 for the corresponding period in 1911, 
an increase of 35,663,909 pounds, or 11 per 



cent., is shown. The values of the same 
were, respectively, $40,463,990 and $33,300,- 
973, a gain of $4,163,017, or 10 per cent. 

i^ i|^ i^ 

The leaf importations totaled 47,554,613 
pounds, while during the same period in 1911 
it amounted to 44,003,022, an increase for 
the current year of 3,551,591 pounds, or about 
8 per cent. 

♦ * >K 

The National Cigar Leaf Growers' Union 
of the Miami Valley now have about twelve 
warehouses located in Warren, Montgomery, 
Preble, Darke and Maimi Counties. There 
they finish their own crops. The Union also 
covers a portion of the territory along the 
Indiana line on the Indiana side. The head- 
quarters of the Union are at Dayton, Ohio.. 

None but members of the Union can enter 
their crops to be finished. These warehouses 
are owned and controlled by a stock com- 
pany composed of union members only, and 
are duly incorporated. 



CORRESPONDENCE 



Hudson, N. Y., Jan. 5th, 1913. 
Please publish the following reply to Mr. 
Reily's statement: He claims that he was 
not exactly treated right by the committee and 
by the C M. I. U. of A. I wish to say that 
I was chairman of the Stogiemakers' Com- 
mittee which was composed of Connelly, Kane 
and Bogaska. The committee treated Mr. 
Reily just as good and as fair as any person 
could expect. We asked him some questions 
which the committee thought were no more 
than proper, but his reply was: "None of 
your business." This was in regards to the 
standing of their organization. The commit- 
tee had told Mr. Reily of our standing but 
that did not appear to make any impression 
on Mr. Reily. In the first place I wish to say 
that the Stogiemakers* constitution or by- 
laws greatly conflicts with the constitution of 
the C. M. I. U. of A. It I think would be 
almost impossible for the Cigarmakers' In- 
ternational Union to reach any agreement 
with said organization for they want every- 
thing and will not concede anything. I wish 
to state to the members of our organization 
that President G. W. Perkins has hit the nail 
in the right spot when he said that they were 
looking for recognition from the A. F. of L. 
In my opinion that is all they want. They 
don't want to amalgamate with us; they 
want us to adopt some proposition that they 
are ready to present to us and by us conceding 



to such a proposition it would be the means 
of the Stogiemakers gaining recognition from 
the A. F. of L. I don't consider it advisable 
for us to go any further in this matter until 
they make their case clearer to us. 
Yours fraternally, 
JAMES CONNELLY, 
Chairman Stogiemakers' Committee. 



Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 8, 1918. 

Give credit to whom credit is due. In 
looking over the report of Inťl Financier Wm. 
Campbell in December Journal, I notice that 
it states the books of Union 77 are in better 
than fair condition and that Vice-Pres. E. G. 
Hall IS always ready and willing if called 
upon when in doubt, which I will not deny. 
Cut will state that when I was elected to the 
office of secretary, by suggestion of the Union 
I was requested to get all the knowledge I 
could until I took charge of the office. Mr. 
Max Conrad was then acting secretary and 
all who know him give him credit for being a 
good financier, and it is from him that I 
received my instruction^ and which I tried to 
follow to the best of my ability. While I 
asked Mr. Hall a few questions, but no more 
than from any other member that I thought 
could advise me, and which I was always 
willing to accept if to the best interests of the 
Union or its members. 

Trusting that you will publish the above in 



8 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



the next issue of the journal as I think I 
am entitled to some consideration. 

ERNEST RODE, 
Ex-Sec. Union 77. 



Oneida, N. Y. 
Notice to Secretaries and Traveling Mem- 
bers: 
Local No. 12, Oneida, N. Y., has, some 
time since, appropriated fifty ($50.00) dol- 
lars out of its local fund, to be given trav- 
eling members in the form of private loans 
on full cards. At the present time over 
•eighty (80) members have taken advan- 
tage of this loan and have failed to repay. 
Until this fund is replaced, Local No. 12 
will not grant any loans on full cards, 
neither will it give any relief of any kind 
to traveling members. Furthermore, if 
nothing is heard from the members owing 
private loans to Local No. 12 before the 
next issue of the Official Journal, their 
names will be published and the constitu- 
tion enforced. Business has been good and 
there is no reason why thèse loans should 
be outstanding. This is the last call. 

H. L. WILLIAMS, 
Secretary. 



Boston, MasB. 

Wisconsin has recently Inaugurated a system 
of state insurance and Is prepared to furnish 
various forms of life insurance to residents of 
Wisconsin at slightly lower cost than the regu- 
lar companies. 

Among the advantages claimed for the Wis- 
consin plan are that the element of profits Is 
done away with, the cost of operation is low, 
there are no overhead charges for officials and 
management, and application can be made 
through local officials or directly by mall. 

But for more than four years Massachusetts, 
through Savings Bank Life Insurance, has pro- 
vided an opportunity for Us citizens to obtain 
the best insurance protection at the lowest pos- 
sible cost. The savings banks which have 
opened Insurance departments have afforded to 



^te SmtttnfaMtttitůn bet &. (S. &. 1911. 

S5cr „^onfutttQcnoffcnfcl^aftlid^en SRunisid^au* 
cntncl^tncn luir folgcnbc SJarftcHunQ über bic 
3ioûrrcnfûbrtïûtion ber ®ro^ein!auf3*®efeïï* 
fcöaft beutfd^cr álonfumbereinc trn ^áx)ze 1911: 
S)tc gigarrenfabrücn in grcmíenbcrg, Hamburg 
unb ^ocfenl^eim ^aben t^ren Umfoç irat runb 
cinc Çûlbc SWilíion 3Kar! ûefteigert. @r betrug 
2,699,606.85 3Rf. geoemiber 2,145,569 Tlí, 
trn ^áfíxe 1910. ^er aWe^rumfab beträgt alfo 
genau 554,037 3K!. S)te ©ert^cííunQ beë Um* 
fûfeeê auf Sxqazvtn unb anberc gabnřatc aetgt 
fofgcnbe Ucberftd^t: 

^on bent ^a^zeSbenáítt 1911 entfaHen: 

"auf Sigarreú 1,856,739.25 SKf., gegen 1,* 
477.389 W. im ^a^rc 1910. 

«íuf S:abařfabrtřate 781.919.60 Will, gegen 
008,180 2WÍ. im ^aíre 1910. 

Síuf anbere §írti!el 60,948 m, 3ufammen 
2,699,006.85 W. 



ihe people all the benefits which state ixisur- 
anee could give. 

The premiums asked by the insurance depart- 
ments of the savings Danks are lower than 
those adopted by the Insurance Department of 
Wisconsin. For example: 

In savings bank life insurance, at age 30, 
straight life policies for 11,000 would cost 120.64. 

in the state Insurance of Wisconsin the cost 
is $21.96. 

In savings bank life insurance, at age 30, 20- 
payment life policies for $1,000 would cost $29.28. 

In the state Insurance of Wisconsin the cost 
is $31.07. 

The Wisconsin premiums, however, are calcu- 
lated on a 3 per cent reserve basis, while the 
rates prepared by the State Actuary of Massa- 
chusetts for use of the insurance departmenta 
of the savings banks are on a 3H per cent re- 
serve basis. 

The insurance departments of the Massachu- 
setts savings banks have made a most excel- 
lent showing. There are now more than 6,900 
policies in force with insurance to the amount 
of about $2,600.000. 

On November 1, 1912, the State Actuary an- 
nounced a reduction in the rates of the straight 
life and 20 -payment life policies for $500. 

The success of savings bank life Insurance 
has enabled the insurance departments of the 
savings banks to declare yearly Increased divi- 
dends. The dividends on montnly premium pol- 
icies are as follows: 

First year — 8 H Per cent. 

second year — ^12 V¿ per cent. 

Third year — 14 per cent. 

Fourth year — 16% per cent. 

Fifth yeai^-20 per cent. 

A result never before accomplished in the 
first years of any Insurance organization. 

The growth of Massachusetts Savings Bank 
Life Insurance is also indicated by the steady 
Increase of the premium income. In the first 
year, $25.877.29; second year, $58,890.68; third 
year, $76,348.92; and in the fourth year the total 
premium income of the insurance departments 
of the savings banks was $102.832.27. 

Four savings banks have opened insurance 
departments and fourteen other banks have be- 
come public agencies. Various other public 
agencies have also been established, and more 
than 175 leading manufacturers of Massachu- 
setts are co-operating through agencies for the 
benefit of their employees. 

At the close of the financial year, October 31, 
1912, the admitted assets of aU four banks 
amounted to $321.586.76, and a surplus was 
shown of $32,174.32 in excess of all llabiUties. 

It will be Interesting to see whether Wisconsin 
under a scheme of state insurance can do better 
than Massachusetts under savings bank life in- 
surance. H. W. Kimball. 



2)te Stbfatftetöerunq belief ftd^ bei 8^0^^^" 
auf 25.7 Çroaent, bet 3^aba!fabriřaten ßcBöt* 
ten im Salare 1911 945 Vereine au ben èCb* 
ncl^mern ber ^abri!, bei ben ^i^atten 774 5Ser* 
cine, im ^ox\aï}xe lauteten bic beiben Sal^Ien 
880 unb 701. S>ie Snl^I ber Sißarrcn, bie áb^ 
QcfcW lüurbcn, belief fi^ auf 37,213 SKitte qe^ 
nenüber 30,113 TlxUe im ^Sorja^re. ©ter oe* 
träflt bie Umfa^fteigerunfl 23.6 ^rojent, nac^ 
bem 99ert]^e ber faituriertcn SBaaren baßcgcn 
25.7 ^rogent. S)aô aeifit, hQ% ber gigarren* 
umfai? in beffcren ^reiSIaficn ettuag mebr ae* 
îticflcn ift als ber in billigeren. S)ie Qaöl oer 
in ber Bigarrenfabrüation befcöciftigtcn ^erfo* 
ncn betrug (£nbe ^cgcmbcr 1910: 565, Snbe 
1911: 614. (SS ift pier eine (Steigerung hon 
49 ^erfoncn au bcraeicbnen. ^ie 3aÇI beríBc* 
nmtcn ftieg bon 20 auf 23. Qê finb: 3 teitenbe 
^crfonen, 1 S^ieifenber, 11 SBer!meifter unb 8 
Siontoriften. 

lieber bic 93ertl^cilung bcr Sírbeiter auf bie 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



9 



brci gû&ri!cn gibt folgcnbc S^abelle Stuff d^lufe: 

S)ie SûÇI ber bcfd^aftißten ^erfoncn betrug 
in: 

©mnburg, 1910, 103 mônnl., 38 tocibl; 
1911, 119 ntännl., 45 tücibl. 

Oranienburg, 1910, 57 männl., 68 toetbl.; 
1911, 56 mann!., 62 Ipcibl. 

^odcnl^cttn, 1910, 112 niannl., 187 tocibL; 
1911, 122 mcmni., 210 loetbl. 

Sufotnmen: 1910, 272 mönnl., 293 toeibl.; 
1911, 297 mannl., 317 toeibl. 

SDer Umfafe bcr Sigarrenfabrtïen ber ®rofe* 
cintaifôgefeïïfd^aft tft immer nodö fe^r auiJ* 
be^nunoiSfa^ig. SDer 93eridbt lonftatiert, ha^ 
bie Sirbeitergal^I berbreifadgt iperben tônnte, 
iDenn alle ©ereine i^re gifturren aui^Jd^Iiefelid^ 
bon ben ®ro^ein!aufggefeIIfc!^aft besiegen ttmu 
bcn. S)a8 tft !eine bage ©d^á^ung, fonbem bc* 
red^net auf ®runb beS 93ebarfS ber ©ereine, 
bie i^re S^öotren auêfd^Iiefelid^ bon ber ®ro§* 
cinlaufêgefelïfd^aft laufen. S)en Äonfumberet^ 
nen bietet fid^ l^ier alfo günftige Oetegenbeit, 
bie SiuSbel^nung ber éigenbrobuïtion au for* 
htm, S)er Söerid^t ber ©rofeeinïaufôaefettfc^aft 
fteïlt feft, bofe on SSeiträgen für bie ëojialber* 
fiÄerung unb bie Unterftü^ungSraffe in Ben Qi* 
görrenfabriicn nidftt Weniger als 32,500 Sïcï. 
bon ber dJro^einïaufôgefetifd^aft Qt^aïilt tuur* 
ben, eine Siuôgabe, bie fid^ bie 5ßribatinbuftrie 
crfpart. ©ogu !ommen toeiter 11,000 3Karï 
fijo^ne, bie toogrenb ber f^erien auSgeaa^It tüur* 
ben. derartiges la^t fid^ natütlidg nur burÄ* 
Würen, toenn bie i^onfumenten borauf bergidp* 
ten. ben billigeren ©reifen nad^gulaufen, bei 
benen fie bielleifít ein paar Pfennige fporen, 
unb burdfi ftonaentration il^rei? ©eborfS gro^e 
^Betriebe Waffen l^eifen, bie fo biet rationeller 
arbeiten, ba^ fie ibren Strbeitern unb Stnge* 
ftctitcn obne ©ebenîen anftänbtge Strbeitoberí» 
^ältnijfe fd&offen rönnen. 



SB i n t e r ë b r f, ^.*2t. S)cr Stbtoel^rftreii 
bei bcr girma SB. ëd^Ienôig bauert fort. 



S3ernburg. S)er ©tixi! bei ber Sirma 
S>. Äoi u. (£o. ift beenbet. S>ie girma bemil=» 
ligtc für ŽRolIer Sulagen für 19 ©orten 15 
Cf., für 26 ©orten 20 ©f. unb für 7 ©orten 
25 Cf. bto Xaujenb. ^ie SSicřelmad&er erl^at* 
ten für bie goipe bie Einlagen frei entribpt ges^ 
liefert unb erCö^t fid^ boburdp ber Sobn ber 
®idelmad^erinnen — je nadö bcr ®röfee ber 
3igarren — imt 25 bt0 60 ^f. pro 2:aufenb 
(Stücr SBidEct. 

©pengc i. SBcftf. ©ic ©ctocgung bei 
bcr f^irma ScfdSmann u. So., Sctriebc ©penge 
unb CctingÖaufcn, ift beenbet. S)ic girma be* 
milligte nod& 25 Cf. auf 21 ©orten unb 50 ^f. 
auf eine ©orte. Stufeerbem foil im ?{anuar ieS 
nädöften Sacrée eine toeiterc SoCncrl^öl^ung ein* 
treten, ^^ 

Hamburg, ^lunmctir betoiïïigtc audö bie 
/Çirma ©. SicrináS u. (5o. ßol^nj^utagen. ßee* 
tere betrugen bei 3 ©orten 50 ^f.. bei 7 ©ors» 
ten 1 Tlí. unb bei 3 ©orten 2 SER!, pro SWiHc. 

(Cottbus, $rob. 33ranbenburg. 5)cr ©trctï 
bei ben girmen @. ?í. 53cmmann, 95. ©egat, 
ÖJebr. ©tot) bauert fort. 

93ünbe*@mipiob. ^cr ©trci! bei bcr 
ifirma Gart SBcïïcnftcc! u. ®o. bauert fort. 

(Ta Tbc a. ©. î)cr ©treif bei bcr girma 
®. ©d^ulac bauert fort. 



^ůn bet bftntf^cn 2:abQltitbttftTie im ^ûitt 

1911 inirb folgenbeâ bcrid^tet: 2)ie Stol^tabaï* 
preife í^abtp. fiq auf bem i^ohen Sflibeau ocÇal* 
ten, für cingcine ©orten Xaoaîe finb fie fogar 
noà çeftiegen. 2)iefe Sl^l^atfad^cn Çaben ber 
î^abahnoufîric mand^erlei ©d^toanhingen ge* 
bradât, bie fid^ inâbcfonbere barin auSbrüden; 
ba^ ettoa ein l^albcS Š)u^enb Iteinercr gabrifen 
ben öetrieb einftelltcn. Çerborgeboben gu toer* 
ben berbient, ba^ bie 3iö«t^cnfabri!en im aH* 
gemeinen beffer als in ben amci borbergegan* 
genen Rubren befdiöftigt toaren. ©letd^fpm ift 
aud^ bie Haftung feitenS bcr Äunbfd^aft cttooS- 
beffer getoorbcn. îtïïgcmein Çerrfd^t ^inar bie 
Stnfid^t, ba^ baë ^áí^t gtoar einen geringen 
gortfd^ritt gegeigt l^at, ba^ aber, toie bon etn* 
acinen gabriiantcn crüärt toirb, biefer balb 
mieber braufgeCen toerbe unb man feine fünf** 
ticen S>ii?pofitionen bementfpred^enb treffen 
muffe, aumal an ein Sutnâ^ef^tn oer ÍRol^tabaí* 
preife borlaufig ntdöt gu bcn!en fei. gotgenbe 
ÜcberfidRt über bie (Sntmidlung bcr S^abaïinbu* 
ftric in S)anemar! bürfte aud^ bie beutfd^en SCa* 
bařorbciter interefficren: 

ñigarren. 1897, 150 aWiïï. ©tüd; 1907, 
252 mm. ©tüd: unb 1911, 262 SWill. (Btnd. 

8igariIIo8, 1897, 10 a«ill. (Bind; 1907, 
32 SKill. <Btúd; unb 1911. 50 SWiïï. (Bind. 

Zigaretten, 1897. 10 SWiU. ©tüd: 1907, 1 
aWill. Btúd; unb 1911, 190 SKill. Bt&d. 

83ci einer Umfrage baben 70 gigctrrenfabri* 
řanten, beren ?Probu!tion 72 ?Pro;». ber ®e^ 
fommtprobuřtion lunfaftt, Stufflorung über 
ibren OefdRäftSgong gegeben. SMcjcnigen 8i* 
'>arrenarbeiter, bie nodö nebenbei für eigene 
^pdönung arbeiten, ftnb nidöt mitgc^äl^tt, bodñ 
Täfet fid5 bie ^-Brobuïtion berfelbcn auf 4 bis 5 
Millionen Sigarren fd^O'^cn. — „S5er î:aba!ari 
better". 



Hnutí řemeslné, jakožto velká morální síla, 
.iest nezbytným činitelem v sociálním i eko- . 
nomickém životě národa. Dosažením vySSí * 
mzdy a zkrácením pracovních hodin zlepSu.ie 
se stav rodiny; povznáfií se tón dětského 
vzdělání a vyvíjí se jemnější instinkty cha- 
rakteru. 



Ochrana života a údů pracujících tříd při 
obsluhování nebezpeěných strojů, jest daleko 
vétSi důležitostí pro sociální blaho národa 
nežli hromadění bohatství a ochrana majetku. 

Bída jest zárodkem mnohého zla, jímž trpí 
sociální Život v zemi; její ponižující a demo- 
ralizující vliv jest patrným v nejnižších 
vrstvách lidu naSich přeplněných velkoměst. 
Převládající poměry v těchto spodinách lid- 
ského života směřují k nízkým instinktům — 
vnukají zoufalost a ničí veškeru naději. 

Výroba doutníků a Cheroots ve druhém a 
třetím okrsku vnitrozemni daně města New 
Yorku, za něž daň zaplacena v měsíci listo- 
padu 1912, obnášela 76,774,100 kusů. Za stej- 
ný měsíe v roce 1911 jssplaceaa daň ze 66,-: 



10 



CIGAR MAKERS^ OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



914,320 doutníku. Jeví ae tedy letos Tzrfist 
o 9,859,780 doutníku u porovnání se stejným 
měsícem minulého roku. 

Výroba doutníků v devátém okrsku vnitro- 
zemní dané v Pennsylvanii, za něž daň za- 
placena v měsíci listopadu 1912, obnááela 79,- 
798,380 kusů. Za stejný měsíc v roce 1911 
Eaplaceno daně ze 67,900,310 doutníkfi. Le- 
tošní vzrůst se jeví o 11,890,070 doutníků 
oproti měsíci v upl3rnulém roce. 

ManilStí vyrabitelé doutníků požádali vlád- 
ní úředníky o zavedení vjroby doutníkfi ve 
veřejných Školách, jakožto pravidelný kurs 
ve vyučovacím systému na Pilipinských 
Ostrovech. 



Bdělost a činnost jest tajemstvím úspěchu 
snahy organizování neuniových mužfi a žen. 
Důvěra v koneěný úspěch zajiSťuje polovinu 
vítězství; neúměrná práce to jest jež průbě- 
hem doby se dopracuje kýžených výsledků. 

Pracující třídy mají tu moc snížiti ceny 
životních potřeb a sice spolupůsobením při 
koupi a rozdělování potravin. Kupováním 
přímo od výrobníků mohou být přehnané vý- 
dělky překupníků sníženy a po případě na 
dobro odstraněny. , 

Hnutí řemeslných unií má být vojenskou 
organizací pracujících tříd. Potírá živě a 
energicky útisky a nespravedlivé jednání. 
Staví se proti takovým industriálním pomě- 
rům, jež mají za úěel podrýti domov; snížiti 
úroveň amerického soužití; zvýfiiti pracovní 
hodiny nad 8 denně a zaměstnávati mladistvé 
osoby a dítky při takolVých řemeslech, jež 
jsou na úkor jich fysickému vývinu a blaho- 
bytu. 

Dělnická organizace může udělati chyby — 
každá lidská organizace může — a nejlepSí přá- 
telé její jsou ti, kdo to uznají a hledí se 
těchto vyvarovati. Chyby její vfiak jsou malé 
u porovnání s chybami protivníků, a jsou 
jako malá kapka vody v mocném moři, po- 
rovnají-li se s mnohými velkými a dobrými 
výkony jejími. 

Uniový znak jest stálým kandidátem děl- 
níků, úplně a neodolatelně zavázán hájiti je- 
jich zájmy. 

Každý den jest dnem volebním s uniovou 
známkou. Každý pracující muž a žena mají 
příležitost voliti pro uniové podmínky kdy- 
koliv cěco kupují, a tento hlas účinkuje pro 
dobro více než všichni politikáři v zemi. 

Uniový znak jest jediný kandidát, vlastně- 
ný organizovanou prací, a bude věrným děl- 
nictvu právě tak jako dělníci jsou věrni to- 
muto, ^dyby se dělníci zajímali o uniový 
znak každého dne tak jako se zajímají o po- 
litiku jednou za rok, neb jednou zá 4 roky, 
síla a užitek uniového znaku byl by několi- 
krát zvýSen. 



Uniová práce zasahuje do všech veřejných 
otázek více nežli kdy před tím. Světoví my- 
slitelé poěínají nyní oceňovati pravdu, že po- 
Ž8?davky dělnictva značí Více, než se povrchně 
zdá. Oni pozorují, Že poptávka po práci není 
pouhým činem k zachránění života jednotliv- 
ce, avšak že jest to lidské přirozené právo; že 
hnutí zkrátiti hodiny pracovní, není činěno 
k vůli vyhýbání se povinnostem práce, nýbrž 
z lidskosti, by nezaměstnaní dělníci měli pří- 
ležitost pracovati; a že miliony hodin delšího 
odpočinku prací přemoženým dělníkům zna- 
menají miliony zlatých příležitostí k ulehčení 
břemen massám lidu, učiniti domovy příjem- 
nějšími, srdce lidská lehčími, naděje a snahy 
ušlechtilejšími a rozsáhlejšími. 



( I 



Volající potřeba dělného světa jest or- 

§anizace neorganizovaných. Předvoj musí 
nes takřka posečkati až oni (ti nesorgani- 
zovaní), budou vřaděni do pluků průmyslové 
armády. Vlastní zájem musí býti podkladem 
jakéhokoliv platného důvodu těmto, tak jak 
jest to se všemi muži. Kdo jjim může co nej- 
platněji naznačiti, jak jsou jejich zápmy spo- 
jeny s účelem unionismu a získá je by se 
nechali zapeati k unii, přispívá hnutí nejvíce, 
^de .spočívá srdce a duše budoucí naděje. 
Jiní mohou řečniti a psáti o nesnázích, činiti 
výtečné služby, avšak my máme podnikati. 
V důležitosti naší práce nedáváme přednost 
nikomu. Unie jsou dynamickou mocí nového 
pořádku. Ony tvoří instituce a zbudují civi- 
lizaci v budoucnosti. Dělník přichází k své- 
mu." 



V poslední konvenci Spojených Krejčov- 
ských Dělníků Amerických, odbývané v In- 
dianapolis, Ind., byly přijaty a členstvu k od- 
hlasování předloženy mnohá usnesení, z nichž 
nejdůležitější byly předlohy založit stávkov- 
ní, nemocenský a posmrtní fond, zřízení uni- 
versální platební škály v průmyslu košil a 
overalls a odporučení hlavní výkonné reso- 
luční radě by připravila plány k zavedeni 
universální osmihodinové práce. 



ftemeslnické hnutí uniové jest pomalé. Ne- 
obeahuje nic zvláštního. Získává nesčíslně- 
kráte každým dnem, bez jakéhokoliv vychlou- 
bání, troubení neb hluku. Jeho porážky jsou 
mnohé. Jeho chyby jsou drahé a jeho nezda- 
ry jsou bez počtu. Toto vše jest pouze z toho 
důvodu, že unioniste si hledí svých vlastních 
zájmů a poněvadž (vyjma posledních několik 
roků) žádná instituce — ^politická, mravní neb 
společenská, nenabídla své přátelské ruky ře- 
meslnickému hnutí uniovému. Během posled- 
ního času věak tyto vlivy se úplně obrátily 
a pracují nyní přes Čas, namáhajíce se doká- 
zati, jak nás' milují. Z toho všeho se radu- 
jeme. Budeme však státi při naSich otužilých, 
osvědčených řemeslnických uniích — ^.jediném 
čistě dělnickém hnuti v Americe v přítomné 
«lobč — ačkoliv postrádá vší okázalosti a obra- 
zotvornosti. — Toledo Union Leader. 



Moderní civilizace založena jeet na základě 
individuálního vývoje, při němž hromadění 



CIGAR MAKERS^ OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



11 



bohatství jednotlivci hraje, tu nejhlavnější 
roli. Zájmy lidu, jež tvoři toto přebytečné 
bohatství jest ignorováno v tomto běhu; při- 
měřená odměna za 'služby prokázané měla by 
býti nejdříve vzata v úvahu. Hnutí řemeel- 
niekých unii snaží se vyplniti tuto mezeru a 
vzbuditi sympatie veřejnosti vuěi dělnictvu 
a vyrabitelům. Běh životní slibuje zdravý 
pokrok k zlepšení a přiměřenější rozděleni 
bohatotví. 

The British-American Cigar Stores Com- 
pany, s kapitálem tří milionu dollarů, otevře- 
la úřadovnu v New York City. The British- 
American Tobacco Company, jejímž předse- 
dou jest James B. Duke, má hlavní úřadovnu 
v Londýně, v Anslii. ^istý výtěžek této spo- 
leénosti za úřední rok, po odečteni všech vý- 
loh, obnášel $9,588,809.56, proti $8,014,439.20 
v roce předešlém. 



£1 movimiento de las uniones de gremios, 
como gran fuerza moral, es un factor indis- 
pensable en la vida social y económica de la 
nación. Al obtener jornadas de labor más 
cortas y salarios más elevados, las condicio- 
nes de vida doméstica de la familia han sido 
mejoradas de manera material; elevado el 
tono moral de la educación de los niños y 
desarrollados los mejores instinctos del 
carácter. , ^ 

La pobreza es la raíz y la fuente de muchas 
de las calamidades que aflijen á la vida social 
de la comunidad; su degradante y demorali- 
zante influencia se ve' claramente en los es- 
tratos inferiores de la sociedad, en los ba- 
rrios bajos de nuestras ciudades demasiada- 
mente pobladas. Todas las condiciones que 
existen en esos barrios tienen la tendencia 
de desarrollar y de favorecer los instinctos 
más bajos, de inspirar la desesperación y de 
destruir la esperanza. 

Las exportaciones de tabacos de la Habana 
á países extranjeros desde el 1ro de enero 
al Iro de diciembre de 1912 sumaron á 
161,330,221. En el periodo correspondiente 
del año 1911, el número de puros exportados 
fué de 173,229,217. Resulta, pues, una dis- 
minución de 11,968,996 puros sobre el periodo 
•anterior. Los Estados Unidos y Gran Bre- 
taña son los más importantes consumidores 
de puros exportados de Cuba. ^ 

La protección de la vida y de los miembros 
de la clase obrera en el manejo de maquinaria 
peligrosa, es de mayor importancia para el 
bienestar social de la nación, que la acumula- 
ción de riquezas y la protección de la pro- 
piedad. 

La actividad es es secreto del buen éxito 
en el esfuerzo para organizar los que no per- 
tenecen todavía á la unión. La fe en el éxito 
ñnal quiere decir que está medio ganada la 
batalla; es por medio de un duro trabajo que 



se alcanzan resultados y aún estos necesitan 
tiempo. 

La clase obrera dispone del medio de re- 
ducir el coste de la vida por medio de la 
cooperación al comprar y distribuir los ali- 
mentos. Comprando directamente al pro- 
ductor, se suprime las ganancias exorbitan- 
tes de los comisionistas. 

Los fabricantes de tabacos de Manila han 
solicitado á los funcionarios del Gobierno 
que establezcan la fabricación de tabacos en 
las escuelas para los niños en calidad de curso 
obligatorio en el sistema de educación de las 
Islas Filipinas. 

La British-American Cigar Stores Com- 
pany, con un capital de tres millones de pesos 
oro, ha establecido una oñcina en la ciudad de 
Nueva York. La British-American Tobacco 
Company, de la cual James B. Duke es presi- 
dente, tinene su oficina principal en Londres, 
Inglaterra. 

La producción de puros en el distrito de 
aduana interior de Florida sobre la cual se 
ha pagado imposiciones en el mes de noviem- 
bre de 1912, ha sumado 38,153,773. En el mes 
correspondiente del año 1911, se pagaron im- 
posiciones sobre 35,596,520. Resulta, pues, 
una aumentación de 2,557,253 puros, compa- 
rando la producción de este mes con la del 
mes correspondiente. del año pasado. 

La primera remesa de puros de Cuba os- 
tentando la estampilla oficial de la República 
de Cuba, llegó hace poco á Estados Unidos. 
Esto garantiza que todos los tabacos que os- 
tentan la estampilla oficial han sido verdade- 
ramente hechos en esa Isla. 

El movimiento de las uniones obreras es la 
organización militante de la clase obrera. 
Combate con vida y energía la injusticia, la 
opresión y el mal trato. Se opne á condi- 
ciones industriales que tienen la tendencia de 
cavar el hogďr, de bajar ti tipo de vida ameri- 
cano, de aumentar las horas de labor á más 
de ocho por día y de emplear jóvenes y niños 
en gremios perjudiciales á su bienestar y á 
su desarrollo físicos. 

Las horas de labor numerosas tienen por 
efecto reducir la vida que á cada uno se ha 
concedido; de atrasar su desarrollo mental 
por no proporcionar al individuo el tiempo 
necesario para estudiar y observar las cosas. 
Numerosas horas de labor indican una civili- 
zación poco adelantada en todas las fases de 
là vida humana. 

Precisa agitar, organizar y educar. Sin or- 
ganización, se encuentra uno incapaz de elimi- 
nar las calamidades que existen en la indus- 
tria. 

Cuando un manufacturero rehusa de dis- 
cutir con una delegación de sus empleados so- 
bre los salarios, las horas y las condiciones 



12 



CIGAB MAEBBS' OFFICIAL JOÜBNAL 



del taller, entonces renuncia á todos sus de- 
rechos á ser tratado con justicia. Cuando 
rehusa á sus obreros el derecho de organi- 
zarse para la protección de sus intereses, en- 
tonces se vuelve él una amenaza para la so- 
ciedad y no tiene más derecho á la considera- 
ción de nadie. 

Los favorecedores de la huelga general 
abarcando una industria entera y, si fuese 
necesario, todas las otras, no se dan cuenta 
del hecho que el "lockout" ha sido una de 
las más temibles armas de las asosiaciones de 
manufactureras para someter á los obreros 
por medio del hambre. La huelga general en 
una industria 6 en varias, tendría el mismo 
efecto que un *'lockout." Al mismo tiempo, 
quitaría las asosiaciones de industriales el 
odio que merecen, al adaptar sus mismas 
medidas para obtener una ventaja por el in- 
humano procedimiento del hambre. Los fa- 
vorecedores de la huelga general son, para 
decir lo menos, directores sin competencia. 

Las huelgas son el último recurso en las 
demandas de los obreros para justicia. Los 
derechos, no los privilegios, representan los 
resultados deseados de la organización. En- 
tonces, vivan las uniones de gremios, hasta 
que el unionismo llegue á ser el sinónimo de 
efíciencia. 

La educación en lo relativo á la importancia 
de la estampilla de la unión en las luchas de 
la labor por sus derechos ha sido lenta, de- 
bido á hábitos antiguos y costumbres adop- 
tadas hace tiempo al efectuar las compras, 
pero por medio de la agitación y de la in- 
formación que ha sido dada, los hábitos an- 
tiguos han sido rotos y una justa concepción 
del derecho de nuestros compañeros de labor 
ha resultado que está llevando ahora el movi- 
miento de la estampilla de unión hacia el 
triunfo definitivo. 

Dice el "Shoe Workers* Journal": 
"Algunos miembros no pueden descubrir 
ventajas en la unión sí no obtienen aumento 
de salarios cada tres ó cuatro semanas. No 
reflexionan que la unión proteje á cada au- 
mento que se obtiene y lo hace perpetuo. £1 
valor defensivo de las uniones para conservar 
lo que se ha obtenido, nadie lo aprecia con 
justicia. Si no fuera por las Uniones, la 
labor recibiría ahora menos de cincuenta por 
ciento de los salarios que gana ahora, sin 
tener cuenta de los gastos de la vida de hoy, 
que solo tendrían por efecto sumentar los 
requisitos inmediatos de los obreros y obli- 
garlos á acceptar con mayor buena voluntad 
salarios cada vez menores." 

Cuando compra Ud. un artículo que lleva 
la estampilla de una unión, rehusa por eso 
un dividendo al padrón "unfair" y se lo trans- 
porta al padrón "fair." Rehusa Ud. empleo 



al hermano que no pertence á la unión para 
darlo al hermano que si pertenece à ella. 
Ayuda Ud. al unionista para que obtenga 
mejores salarios, lo que fortalece al movi- 
miento entero de la labor y así mejora su 
propia situación. La estampilla de unión sig- 
niñca "dividendos" para toda la labor unida 
y la supresión del sostenimiento á todois los 
enemigos de ella, es decir, los padrones opues- 
tos á la unión y los desgraciados que trabajan 
por ellos. 

La labor no ha recibido en el pasado más 
consideración que la que estaba en condiciones 
de ex i j ir y de obtener por fuerza. En esta 
lucha, ha hecho, prueba de calidades que no se 
esperaban en hombres de poca experiencia y 
de limitada disciplina. Pero han permane- 
cido firmes y agrupados, han soportado ^ con 
paciencia las injusticias que obraban contra 
ellos y han hecho un trabjo que merece cré- 
' dito y por el cual tienen razón de estar orgu- 
llosos. Con este pasado, el unionista de gre- 
mios puede muy bien no tener malicia para 
nadie y de caridad para los que, faltos de 
entendimiento, están ciegos á las posibilidades 
de esta época. Hay ahora maneras nuevas y 
mejores para hacer cosas viejas, caminos más 
cortos que conducen á antiguos propósitos, 
salarios más elevados para más ligeros traba- 
jos. El entusiasmo constantemente encuentra 
un campo más ancho. Las ideas se mueven 
en esferas más amplias y las alas de la ima- 
ginación se desplegan jnás largas. 

Si Ud. fabrica productos de unión y compra 
los que no lo son se "boycotea" á sí mismo. 

No puede esperar Ud. que miembros de 
uniones compren á su producto si no compra á 
los productos de los miembros de uniones. 

Cuando compra Ud. productos que no son 
de unión, establece una demanda para labor 
que no es de unión que á su vez compra pro- 
ductos que no son de unión pero del ramo en 
• que trabaja Ud., lo que puede tener por resul- 
tado dejarlo á Ud. sin empleo. 

La estampilla de unión es el medio por el 
cual los trabajadores unificados de todos los 
gremios identifican á los productos de cada 
uno de ellos y se prestan un apoyo coopera- 
tivo. Por ella la labor organizada puede ham- 
brear á cada establecimiento que no perte- 
nece á la unión, botándolo así fuera de la 
existencia, si lo desea. 

No hay nada más peligroso en una unión 
como el hombre que siempre está abogando 
la huelga. La huelga es una arma necesaria, 
que no se debe olvidar, pero que no se debe 
emplear hasta que todo haya resultado inútil 
y el "come fuego" que está; siempre abogando 
desórdenes de cualquier clase, es más temible 
que un detectiva de Burns. — Teamsters* Mag- 
azine, j 



CIGAB MAKERS' OPPIOIAL JOUBNAL 



13 



Les partisans de la grève générale, affectant 
une industrie tout entière et, au besoin, toutes 
les autres, négligent le. fait, pourtant assez 
important, que le 'lockout" a été un des plus 
puissants engins des associations d'industriels 
qui s'en sont servi pour soumettre les ouvrier^ 
et les ouvrières en les affamant. La grève 
générale dans une industrie ou dans plusieurs, 
aurait pour résultat pratique les mêmes effets 
que le "lockout" Elle soulagerait en même 
temps les associations d'industriels du stig- 
mate qu'elles se sont attaché en essayant 
comme elles d'atteindre le but par le moyen 
inhumain d'une lente famine. Les partisans 
de la grève générale sont, pour dire le moins. 
des "leaders" incompétents à courte vue. 

La civilisation moderne est édifiée sur un 
développement industriel dans lequel l'accu- 
mulation de la richesse joue le rôle le plus 
important Le bien-être de ceux qui créent 
ce surplus de richesse est totalement négligé 
dans cette transaction ; une équitable rémunéra- 
tion des services rendus devrait au contraire 
être le premier objet en vue. Le mouvement 
des unions de métiers s'efforce de remplir ce 
besoin, en créant un sentiment public favora- 
ble aux droits de l'ouvrier et du producteur. 
La marche des événements indique un progrès 
raisonnable vers une distribution plus juste 
de la richesse. 

Le mouvement des tmions de métiers, en 
tant que force morale, est un facteur indis- 
pensable à la vie sociale et économique du 
pays. Par le fait que des salaires plus élevés 
at de journées de travail plus courtes ont été 
déjà obtenus, les conditions de la vie de fa- 
mille ont été améliorées matériellement; le 
ton moral de ťéducation des enfants a été 
élevé et les meilleurs instincts du caractère 
ont été développés. 

La pauvreté est la racine et la source de 
bien des maux qui affligent la vie sociale de 
la communauté; son influence dégradante et 
démoralisante est clairement visible dans les 
couches inférieures de la société, dans les 
quartiers misérables de nos grandes villes, où 
l'encombrement est si grand. Toutes les con- 
ditions de l'existence dans les "slums" tendent 
à encourager et à développer les plus bas in- 
stincts, à inspirer le désespoir et à détruire 
l'espoir. 

Les longues heures de travail ont la ten- 
dance de raccourcir la durée de la vie allouée 
à l'homme; de retarder son développement 
mental en (Jiminuant le temps à sa disposition 
pour l'étude et l'observation. Les longues 
heures de travail indiquent une civilisation 
peu avancée dans toutes les phases de la vie 
humaine. 

Le mouvement des unions de métiers est 
l'organisation militante des classes ouvrières. 



Elle est vivante et énergique dans le combat 
qu'elle livre à l'injustice, à l'oppression et 
à l'iniquité. Elle s'oppose aux conditons in- 
dustrielles ayant la tendance de miner le 
foyer, d'abaisser la qualité de vie établie en 
Amérique, d'augmenter les heures de travail 
au-dessus de huit par jour et d'employer des • 
jeunes gens et des enfants dans des métiers 
nuisibles à leur bien-être physique et à leur 
développement. 

La classe ouvrière peuvent réduire le coût 
de la vie au moyen de la co-opération dans 
l'achat et la distribution des vivres. En ache- 
tant directement au producteur, on supprime 
les profits exhorbitants des commissionnaires. 

L'activité est le secret du succès dans l'effort 
pour organiser les hpmmes et les femmes non 
syndiqués. La foi dans le succès final donne 
à moitié la victoire. C'est un dur travail qui 
procurera les résultats et il faut du temps 
pour les obtenir. 

Les Unions de Metiers. 

Encouragent l'éducation et déracinent l'ig- 
norance. 

Raccourcissent les heures et allongent la vie. 

Augmentent les salaires et développent le 
caractère. 

Augmentent l'indépendance et diminuent la 
dépendance. 

Développent la virilité et frustent la ty- 
rannie. 

Etablissent la fraternité et découragent 
l'egoïsme. 

Réduisent les préjugés et favorisent la 
générosité. 

Agrandissent la société et éliminent les 
classes. 

Créent des droits et abolisseijt des maux. 

Allègent le travail et égaient l'homme. 

Animent le foyer et 

rendent le monde meilleur. 

Les moyens modernes de production et de 
distribution, spécialement dans le monde in- 
dustriel, ont développé une ère de centralisa- 
tion, de conservation et d'unité d'effort. 

Dans cette ère, et dans toute autre, les 
ouvriers industriels sont sans défense et sans 
protection, en se qui concerne leur bien-être 
matériel, social, industriel et économique, s'ils 
ne s'unissent pas à leurs camarades de. peine. 
Bien imprégnés de cette idée, il y a longtemps 
que les salariés organisèrent ce qu'on connaît 
aujourd-hui sous le nom de mouvement des 
unions de métiers. 

Le mouvement des unions de métiers ne 
ressemble à aucun autre. Il est clair, net 
dans ses aspirations, il limite toujours ses 
membres aux seuls salariés et ses efforts au 
seul progrès industriel en ce qui a rapport 
aux salaires et aux heures de travail. 



14 



CIGAB MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



La journée de huit heures est le grand cri 
de guerre qui trouve aujourd'hui un écho dans 
des millions de coeurs par tout le monde 
civilisé. 

Les travailleurs de toutes les nations sont 
unanimes à demander une réduction des 
heures de travail et en plus des luttes écono- 
miques entreprises par les unions de métiers 
d'Europe et d'Amérique, on fait aujourd'hui 
des efforts pour atteindre ce but. Le mouve- 
ment tout entier des masses ouvrières doit y 
atteindre et nous de devons pas cesser l'agi- 
tation jusqu'à ce que la réduction des heures 
de travail ne soit un fait accompli. 

Instruments du Progres. 

Attaquées et dénoncées comme peu d'insti- 
tutions l'ont été, les unions ont prospéré et 
ont grandi malgré l'opposition. Cette saine 
vitalité est due au fait que les unions étaient 
le produit légitime des besoins sociaux — eindis- 



pensables comme protestation et comme lutte 
contre les abus du gouvernement industriel 
et inévitables en tant que conséquence de cette 
conscience de la force inspirée par la con- 
centration des masses sous les nouvelles lois 
industrielles. Elles ont été, et tous les esprits 
de bonne foi le reconnaissent aujourd'hui, 
de véritables instruments de progrès. Saifs 
parler des avantages matériels qu'elles ont 
valu aux travailleurs, elles ont développé de 
puissantes sympathies parmi eux et leur ont 
enseigné la leçon du sacrifice de soi-même 
dans l'intérêt de leurs frères et, ce qui est 
plus encore, de leurs successeurs. Elles leur 
ont communiqué un nouvel esprit d'indépen- 
dance et de respect de soi-même. Elles ont 
mis quelques-uns des meilleurs d'entre eux à 
leur tête et leur ont donné l'ascendant que 
méritaient leurs qualités personnelles et qui 
était désirable dans l'intérêt de la société. — 
John K. Ingram, LLD. 



REPORT OF DELEGATES. universal design, which appears later in this 

To the Officers and Members of the Cigar- ^^Í?¿^' . r .1. o . t* 

makers' International Union: J^^ l^^^'\ ^^ *^^ Secretary-Treasurer 

Gentlemen- shows that at the present time there are 

\Ar^ *uJ «.«rio,..:»«,^^ /4<.i«»of«e ♦« i-u^ thirty-eight National and International 

We, the undersigned delegates to the ^„.^„^ affiliated with the Department with 

fifth convention of the Union Label Trades ^„ approximate membership of $370,000. 

Department, held in Rochester, N. Y., No- During the year two organizations with- 

vember 7-8-9, 1912, beg leave to submit the ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ Department, the American 

following report. Federation of Musicians and the Watch 

The convention was called to order by ^^^^ Engravers' Union, and three organiza- 

President Tobin m the hall of the Central ^j^^^ affiliated, the Leather Workers on 

Labor Union Rochester, N. Y., November ^^^^^ ^.^^^^^ ^^^ United Powder & High 

7th, at 10 a. m. Explosive Workers of America, and the 

The Committee on Credentials reports sheet Metal Workers' International Alli- 

that credentials had been received from anee. 

sixty-three delegates, and one fraternal Many important subjects were dealt with 

delegate, representing thirty-one Interna- ¡n the Secretary-Treasurer's report dealing 

tional unions. with the work performed during the year, 

The reports of the President and Secre- particularly as to the farmers' organiza- 

tary-Treasurer were submitted. The impor- tions, and the labor forward movement, 
tant matter in the President's report being The following is a report made as to the 

the question of a universal label, and a spe- increase in the output of union labels dur- 

cial committee was appointed for consid- ing the past year, and it shows a very 

ering the matter of a universal label or a gratifying result: 

1911. 1912. Increase. 

United Brewery Workmen International Union 41,836.850 44,289,850 2,403,000 

American Wire Weavers' Protective Association 6,000 6,000 

Stove Mounters' International Union 20.000 22.000 2.00O 

United Cloth Hat and Cap Makers 4.015,000 5,805,000 1.290,000 

Tobacco Workers' International Union 383,900.000 408.925,000 26,026,000 

Glove Workers' International Union 1.841,500 1,874.600 88,000 

united Garment Workers' Union 42,384.000 45,480.000 2,048,000 

Bakery and Confectionery Workers 548,210.590 656,439.000 7.228,410 

United Textile Workers 240.000 400.000 160.000 

Travelers' Goods and Leather Workers 11.000 47,000 86,000 

Journeymen Tailors' Union 511,000 629,681 18.681 

International Molders' Union 28,100 

International Brotherhood of EHectrlcal Workers 83,67^ 

Clffarmakers' International Union 28,315.000 28,600,000 285,000 

American Federation of Labor 9,309,000 9,423,000 114.000 

1911. 1912. Decrease. 

United Hatters of North America 16,660,000 16,478.882 186,108 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



16 



The International Brotherhood of Paper- 
makers' Union report that during the year 
24,000 labels were issued, which were 
pasted upon bundles of rolls of paper. 
This is a material increase as above the 
year 1911. They further report that it is 
impossible to make any estimate on their 
water-mark label, as this goes into the 
sheet and there is no means of knowing 
just how many of these labels are turned 
out. 

The Boot & Shoe Workers' Union re- 
port that during the year they have en- 
tered into agreements with and issued 
their union stamp to 13 boot and shoe 
manufacturers, and the membership se- 
cured from the organizing of these facto- 
ries was 2,385. They further report that 
a conservative estimate of the output of 
the additional union factories organized 
during the year would be about 11,500 pair 
of shoes per day. 

The International Photo-Engravers' 
Union report that during the year 1912 
they have issued their label to 31 employ- 
ers, and that there are now a total of 296 
employers using the label of their organi- 
zation. This, of course, is independent of 
any work bearing the label of the Allied 
Printing Trades Council, of which they 
are a part. 

The Metal Polishers, Buffers, Platers, 
Brass and Silver Workers' Union of 
North America report that during the year 
they have signed label agreements with 
nine firms, but do not state the number of 
employes affected. 

The Journeymen Barbers' International 
Union report that on account of reissuing 
shop cards, many of which replaced others, 
that they could not give any reliable fig- 
ures as to the number of shop cards issued 
during the year, but report that at the pres- 
ent time there are in use approximately 
about 17,000 union shop cards. 

The Secretary-Treasurer of the Interna- 
tional Typographical Union reports: "This 
office has sold more labels during the past 
year than ever before in its history." 

During the year 17 local, label depart- 
ments were organized in various localities. 
The question of convict labor and legisla- 
tion was favorably acted upon by the con- 
vention, and it was voted to continue the 
same. 

It was also voted to endeavor to have 
passed a bill protecting union labels, etc., 
in the District of Columbia and the terri- 
tories where no label law applies. 

The total income for the year was $15,- 
660.24, and the expenditures, $10,073.44, 
leaving a balance on hand of $5,586.80. 



The report of the special committee on a 
universal label or a universal design as 
adopted by the convention, is as follows: 

Report of the Special Committee on Universal 
Label and Universal Design. 

To the Fifth Convention of the Union Label 
Trades Department of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor: 

Ladies and (Gentlemen — ^Your special commit- 
tee, appointed on the recommendation of the 
president of this department, to consider, the 
question of a universal label or a universal de- 
sign for combination with present labels, has 
had several sessions, and has gone into the 
subject committed to it as extensively and thor- 
oughly as was possible with the data at hand, 
and the limited time at the disposal of the 
committee, and it is the unanimous conclusion 
of the committee that it will not be possible to 
present to this convention as comprehensive 
and thoroughgoing a report as the importance 
of the subject demands and the requirements of 
the question make advisable. Tour committee 
recommends, therefore, that it be continued 
with the following instructions: 

That prior to the assembling of the sixth 
convention of this department the committee 
make exhaustive and painstaking investigation 
of the universal label proposition and the uni- 
versal design proposition: that officers of inter- 
national unions having labels, shop cards or but- 
tons be requested to furnish the committee their 
views on the universal label, or universal de- 
sign, especially as applied to the product of their 
trade, and that these views be accompanied by 
opinions from their attorneys as to the legality 
and practicability of the universal label or de- 
sign in that particular trade; that the commit- 
tee be authorized to gather such other informa- 
tion and data as in the opinion of the commit- 
tee will be valuable in connection with the con- 
sideration of the general subject; that the com- 
mittee be also authorized to procure a legal 
opinion from an attorney of national reputation 
as to label registration and issuance; that the 
committee be authorized to meet at least one 
month prior to the assembling o. the sixth con- 
vention and at that time consider all of the 
data and Information that has been collected, 
compile its report, have this report printed and 
placed in the hands of the delegates to the sixth 
convention prior to the assembling of that con- 
vention. 

Your committee is of the opinion that carrying 
out the proerram as outlined herein, together 
with such other measures as may in the mean- 
time be suggested to the committee, or initiated 
or approved by the committee, the important 
question of the universal label, or universal de- 
sign, will be before the sixth convention with a 
comprehensive report and accompanying data 
that will enable the convention to arrive at a 
conclusion that will be generally acceptable to 
the label trades and that will be of value to the 
International organizations affiliated with this 
label department and the trade union move- 
ment generally. 

The secretary of this department is a mem- 
ber of the special committee, and therefore the 
machinery of the department will be at the 
disposal of the committee in the performance of 
the mission referred to it. 
All of which is fraternally submitted. 

JAMES M. LYNCH, 
THOMAS F. TRACY, 
COLLIS LOVELY, 
B. A. LARGER. 
MARTIN IjAWLOR, 
A. J. KUGLBR, 
JOHN GOLDEN. 

Special Committee on Universal Label and Uni- 
versal Design. 

On motion, the report of the committee 
was concurred in. 

It was moved and adopted that the re- 
port of this Special Committee be trans- 



16 



CIGAU MAKERS' OFFICIAL . JOURNAL 



mitted to the coming convention of the 
American Federation of Labor as an offi- 
cial document. 

Extensive plans for the carrying on 
of the work of label agitation as con- 
tained in the report of the Committee 
on Label Propaganda for the ensuing 
year was adopted. The following officers 
were elected; President, John F, Tobin, 
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union; First 
Vice-President, J. W. Hays, International 
Typographical Union; Second Vice-Presi- 



dent, Jacob Fischer, Journeymen Barbers' 
International Union; Third Vice-President, 
Thos. H. Rickert, United Garment Work- 
ers; Fourth Vice President, A. McAndrew. 
Tobacco Workers' International Union; 
Fifth Vice-President, Matthew Woll, Pho- 
to-Engravers' International Union; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Thos. F. Tracy, Cigar 
Makers' International Union. 

■ Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS F. TRACY. 
PHIL H. MUELLER. 



OFFICIAL 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

O. W. PIRKINS, Pr«sld*nt. 

N«w York City, 
on 9t., Boston, 
I VlUo, Montréal, 
on St, Portland, 
lt., Jaclcaonvlll«, 
3»U. HUwauk«e. 
ansapolU. Minn., 
vier St.. Station 

UNION BUSINESS 



.. ..h Section (!1 of the Conallt 

tlon. the following unions are hereby nollfled a 
requesled to remft the following amounts [or t 
purpose of flefraylng the espensea of the offl 
of the International ITnlon: 

2 Buffalo lîOO.OO] 2« Weslfleld ....t!00 

I dncinniid .. 200.MIJ 31 ConnorBVllle .. IW 
. 200.au| 33 Indianapolis . 



. 100. W 
. 200.01 



11 St. Albana.. 
1Î OneWa 

14 Chicago .... 
16 Chicago .... 

15 BInghaJnton . 

n Cleveland ... 200.00 

20 Decatur 200.00 

Î2 Detroit 100.00 

îi Muskegon ... lOD.OO 

2G Milwaukee .. 200.00 

id So. Norwalk. 100.00 

Í7 Toronto 200.00 



14 Chippewa PallalOO.OO 



IS Toledo 

49 Sprlngneld ... 

Rl Holyoke 

S3 New Orleans. 

S5 Hamilton 

ST Champaign . . 



amendment lo Section 64. creating a 



B from [he constitution, and the e 
Section 146 extending the time to 
■nt of death beneflts. 



Constitution. 



Interests are I 



9 1 Constitution when your 



In possession of the unloi 
to the International Union. 

Before notifying the offl 



•hould be returned 
I of the death of a 
the notlfloa 



efl clary member 
with same. .. 
Bpoalted send It 

tion thereon foi 

Unions when notifying this ofBce of cbange In 
secretary will pleaae at once give the new sec- 
retary's addreiB. II possible, so as to obviate 
delays, mistakes, etc 

Financial secretaries when gninttng loan* 
should, as reoulred br Section 104. enter losma 
In flgures and letters. It Is not necessary tu 
punch cards. 



comply with same, and If th< 

.'ard deposited Bend It along i... 

tlon. but takea record of all necessary Informa 



SIGNED WEEKLY. 



REPORT OF INTERNATIONAL 
FINANCIER. 

Jefferson City, Dec. 27. l&lí. 
jf the followlns unions. vl7.. : 

Union 36. Topeka, Kans. 
Bencllt cards and vouchers for expense on 
nie. Corrected errors In dues and assessments 
by entering Hem In receipts for December. 191,' 
Also entered Item in December. 1D12. expense 
lo cover Hem. Omitted O. O. W. eupense for 
April. 1912. t29.04 In dpfiinct First National 
Bank had not been reported, so tiad been In- 
cluded In the deflclency of this union In the an- 
nual flnanolal report. Also corrected (he monpy 
olalmed In possession of Vlnani'lal Secretary 
Curry Statement as follows: 

Balance for .Ian. 1, 1910 «71,02 

lipcelplB to Dec. I. 1912 ÜS8,40 

Kxpended over peri^pnlaue In 1909 3,afl 

Kxpeiided pver perc^nlage in 1911 35 

Totol »903.6.=; 

Expense to n,-o, 1, 191-: 795.70 

Biilfinie on hitnil sli.iuld he Der, 1, ]912,tlET.>S 
FiiiidH of mion - 
Dor, 1. 1912— 

In dofuiiťt l!" X.Li, Biinli .,,,S:19.04 

In Rank of Tiini^Lii 7,42 

In poBB-saion S.i'y ,lohu Cilriv.., 17, 4Î 

Tolal » S3,S9 

Deficiency of union Dec, 1, 1912 t]04.0t 



CIGAB MAKBBS' OFFICIAL JOUBNAL 



17 



Union 47, Quincy, III. , , 

The books and accounts here are so nicely 
handled that to appreciate them they must be 
seen. Gash and stamp accounts correct. Lead- 
er correctly Indexed and posted. Shows every 
member's standing not only in dues, but benefit 
drawn for fiscal year or anythln«: that can ap- 
pear in the accounts. Benefit cards and en- 
dorsed vouchers filed in the rotation In which 
the items are entered. Statement as follows: 

Balance for May 1, 1909 1 432.18 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1912 6,801.62 

E^xpended over percentage in 1909-10 and 
1911 71.69 

Total $6,805.49 

Expense to Dec. 1. 1912 6,324.60 

Balance on hand should be Dec. 1, 

1912 1 480.89 

Funds of Union — 
Dec. 1. 1912, in Ricker National 

Bank $450.64 

In possession Sec-Treas. . Ph. 
Cornelius 13.69 

Total 464.83 

Deficiency of union Dec. 1, 1912 1 16.56 

This deficiency is the amount expended over 
percentage during year 1911 and will be ac- 
counted for this month, as they have an as- 
sessment now being collected to cover the 
amount. 

Union 143, Mendota» 
The books and accounts here are at present 
In very fair order. Most all vouchers ana bene- 
fit cards on file. Cash and stamp accounts at 
present icorrect; better than they have been. 
The new secretary also reports actual funds in 
his possession the last day of the month. On 
Dec. 2 166.00 was deposited In bank. The amount 
due to International Union on examination is 
several small errors in accounts of ex- Secretary 
Kindlg. Statement as follows: 

Balance for Feb. 1. 1908 1 394.83 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1912 2,504.85 

Due to International Union on examina- 
tion 4.64 

ToUl $2,904.32 

Expense to Dec. 1, 1912 2,711.17 

Funds of union should be Dec. 1, 1912.$ 193.15 
Funds of Union- 
Dec. 1. 1912, In Ist Nat. Bank $125.00 

In possession Sec-Treas. Jno. W. 

Spits 63.51 

Total 188.51 

Deficiency of union Dec. 1, 1912 $ 4.64 

As stated before, on Dec. 2, 1912, there was 
$55.00 deposited in 1st National Bank.. 

Union 193, Jefferson City, Mo. 
There are two new shops here that have 
brought men into this local that take an interest 
In union affairs. Looks like better times for 
Local 193. Cash and stamp accounts now cor- 
rect. Benefit cards and original bills for ex- 
pense now on file. Explained to the new secre- 
tary how to balance the accounts at the end of 
each month and how to balance every member's 
dues account with each credit given. Statement 
as follows: 
International balance for Jan. 1, 1912....$ 48.79 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1912 403.03 

Due to International Union on examina- 
tion 42.53 

Total ."$494.37 

Expense to Dec. 1, 1912 412.91 

Balance should be Dec. 1, 1912 $ 81.46 

Funds of IJhIon — 

Pec. 1. 1912, in 1st Nat. Bank $39.91 

In possession Sec. Fleet Shepard 41.55 

Total 81.46 

$35.00 has been deposited In bank during De- 
cember, which leaves in possession of new sec- 



retary, A. J. Webster, at this date, Dec. 27, 1912, 
$8.70. 

Union 207, Carthage, III. 
The books and accounts here are in very nice 
condition (the first time this could be said in 
years). Benefit cards and endorsed vouchers for 
expense on file. Ledger correctly posted. Cash 
and stamp accounts correct. Statement as fol- 
lows* 

Balance for Dec. 1, 1910 $ 866.83 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1912. 762.85 

Total $1,127.68 

Expense to Dec. 1, 1912 793.81 

Balance for Dec. 1 should be., $ 334.37 

Funds of Union — 
Dec. 1, 1912, in Hancock County 

National Bank $302.00 

In possesion Sec. W. B. Traute. . ^18 .00 

Totol 816.00 

Deficiency of union Dec. 1, 1912 $ 19.87 

Union 288, Sedalla, Mo. 
The books and accounts here are in very nice 
condition. Cash and stamp accounts now cor- 
rect. Benefit cards and vouchers on file. Ledg- 
er correctly posted and the secretary and treas- 
urer's accounts balanced at the end of every 
month. The amount due on examination is a 
couple of small errors in money for 30c dues 
collected by an ex-secretary. Statement as fol- 
lows* 

Balance for Feb. 1, 1910 $ 205.64 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1912 1.296.05 

Expended over percentage in 1909 4.90 

Due to International Union on examina- 
tion .90 

Total $1,607.89 

Expense to Dec. 1. 1912 1,406.40 

' Balance on hand should be Dec 1, 

1912 $ 10L99 

Funds of Union — 

Dec. 1, 1912, in Citizens' National 

. Bank $90.01 

In possession Treas. E. J. Don- 
nelly 1.73 

In possession Sec. Clyde M. Brown 9.35 

Total 101.09 

Deficiency of union Dec. 1, 1912 $ .96 

Sections 76 and 77 are disregarded by Local 
233, Sedalia. This is not the first notice of the 
neglect or disrenird of plain instructions of the 
constitution, what do you want done to you 
to make you do business according to our laws? 

Union 328f Crestón, Iowa. 
I hardly know how to describe the local con- 
ditions here. Ex-Secretary O'Loughlln and a 
couple more are right. Dues always paid — in- 
tend to do the right thing all the time — but the 
others, well, it is awful. There must be things 
done; it is folly to fool with them any longer. 
Benefit cards' and vouchers for expense on file. 
Ledger correctly posted for what dues are paid. 
The accounts are correct so far as figures are 
concerned, but Section 175 does not interest the 
members here. It will in the future. Statement 
as follows: 

Balance for May 1. 1910 $284.16 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1912 388.49 

Total $672.64 

Expense to Dec. 1, 1912 636.36 

Balance should be Dec. 1, 1912 $137.29 

Funds of Union — 
Dec. 1, 1912, in possesion Treas. D. 

A. Wareham $ 2.99 

Dec. 1, 1912, in possesion Sec. L. 

C. Wareham 120.90 

Total 128.89 

Deficiency of union Dec. 1, 1912 $ 13.40 

This is deficiency of the union from last ex- 
amination. No attempt to cover anything up-^ 



CIGAS MAKEB8' OFFICIAL JODBNAL 



simply report mooey, etc.. Just ai It la. It not 
only U contrary to Che constitución, but uurea- 
«ona.b1a for afflcers to hold money in this maa- 

Unlon 409, KewanM, <l[. 

The bookB and accounts hers are In very nice 
condition. BenetlC carda and vouchers for ex- 
pense all on flie. L«dKer nicely Indexed and 
posted. Cash ana stamp accounla correct. State- 
ment BB fOllOWB: 

Balance tor May 1, 1903 1 10T.30 

Receipts to Deo. 1, 191! I,34T.« 

Expended over percentage In 1909-10 

and J911 , 4.74 

Total SI ,4S9.«> 

Expense to Dec, 1, I91Z 1,41)9.70 

Balance for Dec. 1, igi;, should be I 41.99 

ITunds of Union- 
Dec. 1, 191J. In Union Nat'l Bank. (10.00 
In posses H< n 4;ec. Chris. Ennls 3».£8 



Total . 

Deficiency of i: 



t 49.ÍS 



secretary Ennls il 



tary ] 

, .a bank on Dec. 2. 1912, »20.1 

money on hand reported Just ai 

the way reports ' — "' 



ilvays made out. 
- Illy. 
.. CAMPBEUU 



J Fins 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 
DECEMBER, 1912. 

KECEIPTS. 

TAX. 

t Buffalo t^OO', 83 Nashville t: 

4 Cincinnati 100;179 Bangor " 1 

e Rochester 200; 1S2 Madison 1 

ISC. Albans E0|l8B Flint 1 

Decatur SOOiJSS Seattle 

1 Malboro 601197 Warsaw 

2 Detroit 1001200 Galesburs 

« South Norwalk. fiOlÏÏOE Battle Creek.... 

5 Westfleld IO0I26S Escanaba 



31 Conneravllle . 



Ft. Wayne 200J29O Janeeville .. 

New Haven 200 237 Canton 

~ ■ - -■■ iOK 323 Sheboygan . 

ZOO 3Ë4 Key West.. 

200 357 Vancouver . 
E0I3S8 Utuado .... 

"— 1394 Syc 



48 Qrand Rapids, 



E5 Hamilton 300|394 Svi 

68 Montreal 2001(07 Norwich 

I« I.ewlaton 100 42« Hlbblns 

7E Columbus GONSO Orlando 

77 Minneapolis . . . iOot 

Books a 

14s Salamanca ....|( 
149 Brooklyn - J 

4 Cincinnati 



* ^..inc^nnaiL , . . - 

4 sail Lake City 

5 ï^nnlbal .!!" 



3 GE Chelsea . 



S9 Schenectady . 
eo Keokuk 



. 1 



I Oneida ... 

7 Brooklyn 1 

«Grand Island.. 1 ee... 

ft London 1 

■t Leavensworth . ! isle . 

■e Pueblo 

S Salamanca 

RTATrONERT. 

e Albla ÍI.75I «6 Lewlston 

S Toledo ]. 20 4E Grand Rapide. 

3 Sprtnglleld .... 1.75310 Manistee 

3 Alton -t.RO es Three Rivers.. 

8 Preemont 1.7.'ii374 Key West 

1 Holyoke 1 . 3.K0I37Î Marshfleld ... 

t Mendota 3.G0I118 Bralnard 

I Dea Molnea l.iOIJiS San Diego 



MISCBLI.ANEOUS StJPPUES. 

31s Chatlanoosa t Z.7s 

91 Allentown I.J9 

S Patterson W 

428 Trenton l.M 

26 Milwaukee 11.60 

581 WaterCown i.ei 

282 Bridgeport I.OO 

IGQ Plqua 1.35 

37 Toronto ^,^^ 

J. A. B., St. LoulB 2.&0 

174 JollBt g.2* 

48 Toledo t e> 

So» Rothavllle ee 

SU SheboyKan 1 jo 

7 Utlca 1.09 

318 McSberrytown ti 

1ÎS Appleton 3.»0 

33S Hammond 1 76 

35 Dayton i.e« 

U6 BtUlnn 4 jft 

200 OalesEurs 12 20 

299 Mlddleton 11.06 

B Syracuse «0 

4SE Augusta EM 

228 San Francisco , 7 Is 

<97 Kankakee 2 oa 

188 Flint .80 

388 Chicago . . 6 75 

272 Lansing SéŠ 

47S Fltchburg 1 2.^ 

■ 329 Fond duXac, label plate .' l'oô' 

35E Honeadale. label plate 100 

27 Toronto, label cut jn 

388 Tampa, label cuts 1 mÏ 

1S8 Sloui Falls. Ubel cut ,'.', 2a 

108 Lock Haven. label press g no 

318 McSherrytown. label prees aiOO 

103 Ansonla, Ink pad »k 

61 Holyoke, ink pad '.'.'.'.'.'" *3s 

247 Blue Island, dales 'fis 

Ï23 Sheboygan, dales Sï 

36 Milwaukee, dates ¿S 

161 Denver, canceling stamp '75 

12 Oneida, canceling stamp ;76 

21 Malbora. Cype 3? 

,Ji îiîl<^' -äupiicate charter....;::::;:;: ;6o 

38S Chicago, Spanish Clgarmakera' 

.,0» S^r""? Valiěý.' ¿¡¿amakire'' ch¿rt¿r t'Öo 

480 Orlaïlo, A. R. Smith, del. loan ; il.OO 

Receipts (or December SS 244 II 

Balance, December 1, 1812 i;2Ii;05 

Total tg,4GS.l« 

Q^^^KXPENDITURBS FOR DECEMBER. 

Printing 2,916 blank cards m"em"beMhÍ¿: ; «SO 

Prntlng I.BOO postals, Form !.. î 71 

Printing 600 postals, reference amend! * 

ments aiiicnn 

Printing 660 circulars. . i'-w 

Printing a.îOO votlne blanks «îïS 

PrlntlSI rtÏMon?rr?or lo^V unton;" " ' ' îî 10 

P^ntng Ï.000 sheets 20c dues.....: «m 

pîiS S5 5f*"'*^ ''V*" ^"^ numb¿rin¿ s'oM 

Printing November Journal <5l Tfi 

Ru'rin^^e'îre/h'ïïïS. r^^.: y.: 'Td 

J. B. Farrell «alary and expense as' Or- 

■W.^.'Todd:'i;i¿^'^d'¿ipen¿4'¿» Or- "^'"^ 

W. S BestliuaH-'andeipeM^MOr: *"**'"' 

ganlzer ............................ ias aq 

Phil. Wagaman, salary and expense as 

E. eT Greenawalt, '¿¿íary'ónd' '(aipénse as 

Organizer Kn no 

P. R. Martlnei, salary and expense as 

Organizer ï2ï S7 

W. A. Campbell, salary and expense as 

Financier sjs.on 

A. Strasser. salary EO 00 

Wm. McCabe, salary and expense to 

Hudson 7 75 

J. Satterwhite. salary and expense to 

Norfolk jftt 



CIGÂB MAEEBS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



19 



Samuel Gompers, expense aa Delegate 

to A. F. oř L 71.16 

T. F. Tracy» balance as Delegate to 

A. F. of L*. coDTentlon 18.S0 

Spanish translation 4.20 

Storage on records and ballots 22.00 

Presses and seals for local U|iions 18.90 

1,000 clasp envelopes ^ 4.17 

One ream wrapping paper 6.67 

One ream wax tissue paper 1.70 

1.000 large envelopes 1.43 

Postage on letters and cards 57.50 

Postage on Journals 85.61 

8,000 postals for Forms 1-2 and amend- 
ments 80.00 

l.OOO Red Cross seals 10.00 

Expressa^e on labels and supplies 112.92 

BlectrlcUght 1.84 

Telephone service 8.30 

Carting supplies to Chicago unions 1.20 

Expressage on package from Pittsburg. . .90 

Expressage on package to Manchester.. .70 

E^LChange on checks 2.25 

Miscellaneous supplies 2.45 

Three telegrams not prepaid 1.76 

Returned cash loan 1,900.00 

Expense for December 16,178.38 

Balance December 81 1,281.88 

Total 16.455.16 



PRICE LIST OF CASH SUPPLIES. 

(When ordeiing state quantity or number of 
article« wanted.) 

Ctaartar 15.00 

Duplicate charter (state when organised).. .60 
•Label canceler. Including type and ink nad 
JwtaMi ordering state revenue district)... 6.00 
•Extra set of type for same (duplicate).... 1.00 
•Extra plates for additional revenue dis- 
trict, each (when ordering state revenue ^ 

district) V 1.00 

•Factory numbers» logotypes (solid num- 

bers) in sets of live .28 

Ink pads for label canceler (8x4% or 8x8%), 

duplicate 85 

1,000 label order blanks, prepaid 50 

1 200-page register» prepaid. 60 

1 100-iMge register, prepaid 40 

Electro cuts tor advertising label, 234xf4 in. .20 
Electro cuts for adyertislng label, 4HxlH In. .26 
Duplicate set year dates, label canceler, 

commencing 1912, five years, prepaid 40 

•One oancelUng stamp, complete^ for due 

stamp« r 76 

Duplicate set year dates, due stamps, can- 
celer, good for five years 16 

•Union seal (state when organised) 1.00 

One set of books, consisting of 100 -page 
ledger, day book and treasurer's account 

book 2.00 

200-paire ledgte* or day book, charges "col- 

i%ev^...vr: : ?. 1.00 

800-pags day book or ledger, charges "col- 
lect^ 1.50 

100-page day book or ledger, charges "ool- 

i^¿j[ít , , , , , .T77. r. 75 

400-page ' iêdgêX * changes ' ''eolíéct'*' !!!!!!!!!! 8Í00 

500-page ledger, charges "collect" 8.50 

One treasurer*» account book, postage pre- 
paid 60 

•Letter heads, 600 sheets, prepaid 1.76 

•Letter heads. 250 sheets, prepaid 1.20 

•BnTelope«, 600, prepaid 1.76 

•BnTelopes, 260, prräaid 1.20 

Bleotrotypes for letter heads and enTelopeS, 

with Mock for tint background, prepaid.. 1.80 
700 treasurei^s voucher receipts, book form, 

perforated stub, prepaid 1.00 

The above articles win ONLT be shipped 
when the order for same is accompanied with 
the requisite amount. Orders to tne contrary 
will not be recognised 

REMIT AT TIME OF ORDERING BtJPPIJEB. 

LIST OF FREE SUPPLIES. 

Labels; 60o In. fee stamps: 80o due stamps; 
20e due stamps; 15e due* stamps; lOe due 
stamps; membership appl. blanks; numbered 
4if# books: blank du# books: blue trav. Mtrds: 
i; rt cards; 90-day trav. cards; trans- 



fer cards; perm, wlth'l cards; 16-yr. with'l 
cards; loan receipt books;, postal loan rec. cds.: 
personal loan receipts: designation <wlll) 
blanks; death report blanks; loss of employment 
cert.; O. of Wk. trav. cards; O. of wk. reg. 
books; O. of Wk. receipt cards; O. of Wk. tray, 
certs.: O. of Wk. and loan receipt blanks; con- 
stitutions; sick relief certs.; monthly report 
blanks; ofDcers-elect blanks; state-of-trade 
blanks; strike report blanks; •financial sees.' 
seal: organisation eirculani: supply order 
blanks. 



•Have to be made or printed to order. 



State of Trade, Jan. 1, 1913. 



GOOD 



27 Toronto 
84 Chippewa . 
68 Albuij 
107 Erie 
122 WaiMn 
166 Snffleld 
286 Beading 
278 Londun 
411 BrackTlIl« 
414 Winnipeg 



F'lla 



rAiB 



8 Patenon 

4 Cincinnati 

7 Utlca 

OTroy 
20Decatar 
21 Marlboro 

23 Detroit . 

24 MDRkegon 
28 Westfleld 
38 Indianapolis 

87 Ft. Wayne 

88 Springfield 

41 Aurora 

42 Hartford 
47Ûnlncy 

67 Champaign 
60Keoknk 

68 Bicbmond 

69 Three BlTera 
72 Burlington 

79 Sandusky 
88 NasbTille 
84 Sangertles 

80 Baa Claire 

88 Dnbaqne 

89 Schenectady 
99 Ottawa 

100 Bdgerton 
103 Ansonla 
109 Aberdeen 
114 Jacksonrille 
117 Pine Bluff 

120 Muscatine 

121 Ithsca 
126 Bphrata 
190 Saginaw 
135 Appleton 
148 Lincoln 
ISOSlouz City 
162 Yoongstown 
168 SI<raz Falls 
154 Lincoln 

165 Mt. Pleasant 
161 Denver 
1R^ Philadelphia 
16T0W0SS0 
U<s ttahkosh 
174 Joliet 
180 Dsnbury 
182 Madison 
180 Flint 
189 Phoenix 

101 Morris 

193 Jefferson City 
200 Galesbnrg 
202 Portland 
206 Battle Creek 
206 No. Adame 
221 Bo. Bend 



222 Peru 

281 Amsterdam 

282 SellersTllle 
240 Norfolk 
247 Blue Island 
267 Lancaster 
272 Lansing 

274 Pekin 

275 Aberdeen 
282 Bridgeport 
28:^ Genera 
'*^« Mnnhelm 
298 Glens Falls 
800 Michigan City 
»04 Racine 

807 Reno 
820 Athens 
321 New Britain 
828 Sheboygan 
831 Crookston 
835 Hammond 
338 Bnreka 
889 Kokomo 
365 HaTana 
378 Brandon 
884 St. Augustine 
892 Lakeland 
.^6 Waterbury 
897 Ionia 
400 Red Wing 
407 Norwich 
410 Centralla 

416 Rikhtirt 
4'6NArwalk 

417 Dunkirk 

419 Salina 

420 St. Thomas 

421 Burlington 

422 Berlin 
427 Rahway 
4.W Carbondale 
443 Albuquerque 
447 Kenosha 

454 Cedar Rapids 
456 AIMa 
46» Albion 
477 Manitowoc 
483 OloreniTllle 
497 Kankakee 




6 Rochester 
26 So. Norwalk 
86 Topeka 
48 Urbana 
44 St. Louis 
62 Bimira 
64 BTansrllle 
66 Learenworth 
71 Elgin 
74 Poughkeepele 
76 Hfinnlbal 
78 Homell 
82 MeadTlIle 
86 Mansfield 
92 Worcester 
98 Omaha 
94 Pawtucket 

97 Boston 

98 St. Paul 
102 Kansas City 
108 Lock Haven 
116 Canton 

124 WatertowB 



127 Mattoon 
29 Denver . 
186 JSudson 
147 Dnlon HiU 

167 Rockford 

168 LaFayette 
ld(» BCilford 
162 Green Ba> 
: 68 Marysrille 
164 Ft. Collins 
170 W. Palm B'ch 
178 Zanearille 

178 Olney 

179 Bangor 
196 Frankfort 
196 Grand Island 
214 Bluff ton 

220 New Orleans 
226 Los Angeles 
239 Lyons 
246 Salamanca 
249 Findlay 
260 Bellrille 

259 Bloomlngton 

260 Plqua 
268 Adrian 

267 Sumueytown 
270 Ft. Dodge 

279 Plattaburg 

280 0wego 
280 WlchlU 
287 Marinette 
290 JanesriUe 
297 Canton 

301 Akron 

302 Tecumseh 

310 Manistee 

311 Auburn 
316 St. Cloud 
:f22 Joplln 
330 Alpena 
336 Tampa 
340TraverM City 
341 Neenali 

.'{44 Atlanta 
361 Mankato 
352 Brookrille 
366 Honesdale 
369 Atchison 

366 Ann Arbor 

367 Ogden 

368 Port Huron 
372 Marshfleld 
"îSl Watertown 
402 Quakertown 
404 Austin 

409k Kewanee 

124 Stratford 

433 Mobile 

435 Kenton 

486 Olyphant 

442 Cape Glr*deau 

<44 Walla Walla 

446 Norrlstown 

»52 Petoskey 

»57 Benton Harbor 

166 Bastón 

176 Ponttae 

479 Wheeling 

482 WausHU 

185 Augusta 

486 N. W'tminster 

487 Baker 

488 Mlddletown 

489 lola 
491 Huron 

494 Fall Rtrer 
496 MarshalltewB 



oioâb makebs' official joübnal 



DETAILED VOTE ON AMENDMENTS. 

We publlah herewith the detailed vote of local unlona upon the amendment« to the Constitution 
where Uie votlDK wea clo«e, and which Involve« the expenditure of money; also on the amend- 
ment to Section 148 reference extaadlQK the tlmf* on death benetlt*. 

The amendment* are numt^ered by aectlon and by the amandinent number on the circular 
contaLnlns the (invention amenamente. Ther arc as followi: 

Amendment to Section It (amendment No. 10), reference maklnK the Internationa] Preeldect 
by virtue of his office a detecate to the American Federation of Labor; to Section IS (amendment 
No. IS), relating to the Increase In the Preeldent'a salary; to Section 64 (amendment No. 11), relatlOK 
to the Increaae In the number of orKanlierii to Section 5i (ajnendmeut No. IS), Increaaln^ the sal- 
arie* Ol the organliers; to Section 84 (amendment No. 32). known as Class A, creatine a half-dues 
and half-beneflti clas«: to Section 84 (amendment No. ii), Htrlklng the optional clause reference 
bunch breaken and rollen out of the constitution; to Section »i (amendment No, £7). reference 
agenta and arbitrators; to Section 14E (amendment No, 73), changing the phraieology of the 9r*t 
aectlon of the death beneflt law; to E'ectlon 148 (amendment No, 74). to strike out live ye^ra, ten 
years and flfteen year* and Iniert eight years, Ufteen years and twenty years, concerning the time 
on death beneflt. 



6ecl2. 


Sec.4E 


Sec 54 


FecSB. 


Sec. 64. 


&ec.E4. 


Sec. 04 


Sec 


HB 


Sec.146. 


No.l(l. 


No, 19. 


N0.Ï1. 












73. 




Te«.No. 


Te*.No. 


TeB,No. 


Tw.Ño! 


Tes! No, 


Yes,'NÓ, 


Tes.No'. 






Te*'.N¿. 




IG 17 




.. «7 


31 10 


.. 47 


41 .. 






) 18 




ei . 


61 ;; 


47 ,. 


42 .. 


41 ., 




42 




42 .. 


.. 18 


1 


.. 11 


.. 11 


11 1 












8 86 


8 4 




2 4t 




i 47 


45 '.'. 


38 




.. * 


it 1 


28 


t8 2 


27 a 


27 a 


.. 80 


28 .. 


30 




il 


2» .. 


23 


17 .. 


24 1 


.. 2t 












28 .. 




» 8 


38 .. 


33 1 


'i 31 


ai '.'. 


31 




.. ! 




J iî 


1 li 


.. is 


G Z! 


S 21 


33 ,. 


33 







«8 85 84 37 



G fll 6 14 17 



34 128 ISl 140 81 138 24 



9 33 7 28 1 38 



9 804 G 293 288 



10 11 



2 48 88 92 



OIOAB MAEEBS' OFFICIAL JOUBNâL 



91 



^< 


Sec. 12. 


Sec. 45. ^ 


^ec 


.54. 


Sec..55. 


Sec.64. 


Sec.64. 


Sec. 94 


. Sec.146. 


Sec.146. 




No.10. 


No.19. \ 


INo.21. 


No.25. 


No.32. 


No.33. 


No.67. 


No.73. 


No.74. 




Yes.No. 


Yes.No. 


ie8.No. 


Yes.No. 


Yes.No, 


Yes.No. 


Yes.No 


. Yes. No. 


Yes-No. 


67. Grand Haven 


9 


• • 


9 


• • 


9 


• • 


9 


• • 


6 


S 


• • 


9 


9 .. 


9 




4 


5 


68. Albany /. • 


29 


3 


20 


7 


8 


11 


8 


19 


3 


22 


• • 


28 


15 .. 


20 




6 


19 


69. Three Rivers 


7 


■ • 


7 




1 


6 


1 


6 


• • 




• • 


7 


6 .. 


5 




4 


1 


70. Winona 


12 


• • 


12 




12 


• • 


12 


• • 


12 


• • 


12 


• • 


12 .. 


12 




12 


• • 


71. Elgin 


8 


• • 


9 




9 


• « 


8 


1 


9 


■ • 


5 




9 .. 


9 




1 


8 


72. Burlington 


35 


• • 


28 




31 


• • 


30 


■ • 


12 




12 




13 .. 


13 




13 


■ m 


73. Alton 


8 
22 


1 


9 
6 


Í7 


9 
23 


• » 

1 


9 
5 


• • 

14 


9 

4 


• • 

17 


9 

4 


• • 

17 


8 .. 
22 2 


8 
! 24 




8 
21 


« • 


74. Poughkeepsle .... 


2 


75. Columbus 


9 


• • 


9 




9 


• • 


9 


■ • 


9 


• ■ 


« • 




9 .. 


9 




9 


• • 


76. Hannibal 


16 


• • 


15 


i 


7 


9 


7 


9 


15 


• • 


• • 


16 


13 .. 


16 




16 


• « 


77. Minneapolis 


56 


• • 


56 




55 


« • 


56 


• • 


56 


• • 


• • 


40 


88 .. 


38 




38 


• ■ 


78. Homell 


4 


• • 


4 




4 


• • 


4 


• ■ 


• ■ 




• ■ 




4 .. 


4 




4 


• • 


79. Sandusky 


11 


■ A 


1 


11 


12 


• » 


1 


u 


r¿ 


• • 


12 




11 .. 


10 




^S 


• • 


80. Danville 


13 


• * 


13 




13 


• • 


13 


« • 


5 


8 


13 




12 .. 


13 




3- 


10 


81. PeekskiU 


11 
6 


• • 


4 

6 


8 


3 
6 


6 

• • 


3 
6 


7 

• • 


10 

• • 


6 


11. 
6 




13 .. 
6 .. 


12 
6 




H 




82. MeadvlUe 


• • 


83. Nashville 


12 


• • 


12 




11 


• • 


9 


2 


12 


• • 


12 




11 .. 


12 




7 





84. Saugertles 


12 


• ■ 


8 


4 


3 


9 


1 


U 


2 


8 


• • 


13 


12 .. 


12 




• • 


12 


85. Eau Claire 


18 


■ • 


18 




18 


• » 


18 


• • 


16 


• • 


• • 


16 


19 .. 


17 




6 


11 


86. Mansfield 


15 


• • 


15 




15 


• • 


15 


m m 


7 


8 


7 


8 


15 .. 


15 




15 


4 • 


87. Brooklyn 


62 


1 


29 


¿é 


61 


• • 


61 


1 


61 


• • 


■ • 


30 


32 .. 


29 




29 


• • 


88. Dubuque 


19 


• • 


18 




18 


« • 


18 


• * 


6 


12 


6 


12 


17 .. 


17 




16 


1 


89. Schenectady 


11 


■ • 


il 




11 


« • 


11 


• • 


» • 


11 


4 


7 


11 .. 


11 




• • 


11 


90. New York 


• • 


241 


15 233 


12 265 


31 237 


85 166 


124 


119 


230 .. 


175 


8 


163 


53 


91. Allentown 


9 


• • 


8 


6 


3 


6 


• • 


9 


7 


2 


7 


2 


9 .. 


9 




1 


8 


92. Worcester 


1 


11 


10 


4 


10 


7 


16 


• m 


« ■ 


18 


• • 


19 


11 .. 


15 




1 


15 


93. Omaha 


1 
10 


14 

• • 


15 

4 


• • 

• • 


15 
11 




15 
11 


• ■ 

• • 


14 
6 


1 
16 


14 

« • 


1 
16 


7 .. 
7 .. 


15 
8 




10 

• • 


6 


94. Pawtucket 


8 


95. St. Joseph 


42 


• • 


42 


• • 


42 




42 


• • 


• • 


42 


42 


• • 


42 .. 


42 




• • 


42 


96. Akron 


8 


« ■ 


8 


• a 


8 




8 


% • 


8 


• • 


• ■ 


8 


8 .. 


8 




8 


• • 


97. Boston •. .. 


7 


43 


30 


26 


37 


6 


« • 


• • 


8 


86 


57 


515 


• ■ « ■ 


• • 




• « 


• • 


98. St. Paul 


26 


« • 


26 


• m 


26 




26 


• • 


45 


3 


• • 


48 


23 : 


13 




16 


• • 


99. Ottawa 


9 


• ■ 


7 


3 


10 




6 


4 


10 


• • 


• • 


10 


10 .. 


10 




9 


1 


100. Edgerton 


14 


• • 


14 


• ■ 


■ • 


14 


1 


13 


9 


5 


10 


4 


13 .. 


14 




• • 


14 


102. Kansas City 


14 


• • 


14 


• • 


14 




14 


■ ■ 


14 


• • 


14 


» • 


14 .. 


14 




8 


6 


103. Ansonla 


9 
8 


• • 

• • 


9 

8 


• • 

• • 


9 
4 


'i 


9 
5 


• • 

3 


• • 

8 


9 

1 


• • 

8 


9 

1 


9 .. 
. 9 .. 


9 

8 




• • 

• • 


9 


104. Pottsvllle 


10 


106. MavsvlUe 

106. Ogaenbure 


23 


• • 


23 


• • 


23 




23 


* • 


22 


1 


23 


• • 


. . . • 


23 




17 


6 


15 


• • 


16 


» • 


15 




15 


• ■ 


15 


m • 


16 


• » 


11 .. 


11 




1 


9 


107. Erie 


10 


m • 


8 


7 


3 


7 


4 


8 


1 


14 


2 


6 


10 .. 


4 




6 


6 


108. Lock Haven 


5 


8 


8 


• • 


8 




8 


• • 


' 8 


• ■ 


8 


• * 


7 1 


L 6 . 


2 


• • 


11 


109. Aberdeen 


11 


• • 


11 


• • 


10 


i 


11 


• • 


• • 


11 


• m 


11 


11 .. 


• • 


11 


« • 


11 


110. Washington 


11 


• • 


9 


1 


10 




9 


• • 


3 


6 


9 


> • 


9 .. 


9 




7 


5 


111. Des Moines 


3 


21 


7 


19 


23 


3 


5 


17 


23 


• • 


23 


• • 


20 .. 


21 




• • 


26 


112. Oneonta 


12 


14 


12. 


14 


12 


14 


12 


14 


10 


15 


1 


24 


19 .. 


7 


Í4 


7 


14 


113. Tacoma ..*. 


26 


• • 


19' 


• • 


16 


6 


6 


15 


4 


13 


3 


13 


18 .. 


11 




10 


2 


114. Jacksonville 


14 


• • 


10 


7 


10 


2 


11 


5 


8 


• • 


8 


• • 


16 .. 


15 




15 


. • 


115. Canton 


7 


• • 


2 


5 


7 


• • 


7 




• • 


7 


3 


4 


6 .. 


6 




• . 


6 


116. Cortland 


12 


• • 


12 


• • 


12 


• B 


12 




2 


10 


2 


10 


14 .. 


17 




17 


B • 


117. Pine Bluff 


6 


• m 


1 


5 


6 


• • 


6 




• ■ 


6 


• • 


6 


6 .. 


• « 


6 


• • 


6 


118. Peoria 


• • 


36 


2 


29 


28 


1 


30 




30 


• • 


14 


24 


48 .. 


64 




43 


1 


119. San Juan 


70 


• • 


80 


• • 


80 


• • 


80 




70 


9 


64 


9 


80 .. 


80 




1 


79 


120. Muscatine 


13 


« ■ 


13 


• • 


13 


• • 


7 


6 


18 


• « 


• ■ 


13 


13 .. 


13 




3 


10 


121. Ithaca 


24 


• • 


5 


11 


• ■ 


20 


• • 


20 


14 


6 


• • 


20 


19 .. 


18 


1 


19 


■ « 


122. Warren 


• • 


47 


8 


39 


7 


40 


12 


35 


• ■ 


47 


10 


37 


33 .. 


34 




19 


16 


123. Hamilton 


15 


• • 


8 


6 


3 


12 


3 


12 


• • 


15 


• • 


15 


8 .. 


9 




4 


5 


124, Watertown 

126. Norwich 


12 


• ■ 


12 


• • 


12 


■ ■ 


12 


• • 


12 


9 • 


12 


• m 


12 .. 


12 




• ■ 


12 


9 


• • 


9 


• • 


9 


• • 


9 


• • 


■ ■ 


9 


9 


• • 


9 .. 


9 




9 




126. Ephrata 

127. Bfattoon 


13 


8 


6 


15 


6 


15 


6 


15 


8 


14 


11 


9 


9 .. 


8 


1 


2 


7 


6 


• • 


« ■ 


6* 


6 


• • 


6 


• • 


• • 


6 


9 • 


6 


6 .. 


6 




• • 


6 


128. El Paso 


19 
4 


Í9 


10 


19 
35 


19 

4 


• • 

25 


19 
14 


■ • 

12 


26 


19 

1 


23 


19 

1 


17 .. 
12 .. 


17 
18 




17 
10 




129. Denver 


S 


130. Saginaw 


29 


1 


24 


4 


31 


• • 


29 


1 


80 


• • 


27 


• • 


41 .. 


48 




41 


• » 


131. Jersey City 


• • 


13 


• 8 


3 


• • 


11 


7 


4 


• • 


11 


■ « 


11 


11 .. 


11 




• • 


12 


132. Brooklyn 


62 


1 


45 




37 


8 


34 


7 


46 


7 


8 


89 


49 ,. 


86 




6 


36 


133. Richmond 


6 


1 


7 




9 


• • 


6 




6 


1 


5 


1 


7 .. 


5 


1 


4 


1 


134. La Porte 


10 




10 




10 


• • 


10 




m • 


10 


• • 


10 


10 .. 


9 


1 


6 


4 


135. Appleton 


17 




18 




18 


• ■ 


12 


7 


22 


• • 


22 


■ • 


22 .. 


22 


• m 


• • 


Ht 


136. Hudson 


6 




6 




6 


• • 


6 




• • 


6 


• « 


6 


6 .. 


• 6 


m m 




6 


137. MassUlon 


16 




16 


• 


16 


• • 


16 




16 


• m 


16 


• • 


16 .. 


16 


• • 


16 


■ • 


138. Newark 


61 




26 


40 


46 


11 


67 


9 


7 268 


8 268 


69 .. 


60 


• • 


2 240 


139. Long Hill 

140. St. Catharines 


10 




• • 


10 


• « 


10 


10 




• • 


10 


• • 


10 


10 .. 


• « 


10 


• • 


10 


20 




20 


• • 


20 


f . 


20 




20 


a • 


20 


• • 


20 .. 


20 


• ■ 


12 


8 


141. New York 


138 


6Í 


59 


125 


5 2Í4 


28 191 


168 


37 


168 


87 


143 .. 


111 


34 


71 


78 


142. Lockport 


7 




• • 


7 


■ • 


7 


• • 


7 


• • 


7 


• • 


7 


7 .. 


7 


• • 


7 




143. Lincoln 


25 




17 


8 


25 


• ■ 


25 


• • 


25 


• « 


25 


• • 


25 .. 


25 


• • 


26 




144. New York 


67 


54 


96 


64 


2r 


72 


95 


13 


77 


99 


»• • 


• • 


128 .. 


98 


3 


23 


128 


(45. Wlinamsport 


A 




5 


• • 


6 


• • 


6 


• • 


5 


• • 


5 


• m 


5 .. 


5 


• • 


6 


• . 


146. New Brunswick... 


22 




15 


8 


23 


• • 


â 


12 


8 


14 


23 


• • 


23 .. 


23 


• • 


15 


8 


147. Union Hill 


88 


i 


81 


9 


91 


• • 


8 


47 


43 


48 


41 


91 .. 


89 


2 


• • 


91 


.149. Brooklyn 


« • 


81 


• » 


94 


• • 


78 


3 


15 


30 


37 


9 


65 


94 .. 


55 


16 


94 




ISO. Sioux City 


14 


1 


16 


1 


14 


2 


6 


9 


• • 


16 


16 


« « 


7 .. 


• ■ 


10 




10 


152. Youngstown 


5 




5 


• • 


6 


• • 


6 


• m 


5 


• • 


• • 


5 


5 .. 


5 


• • 


5 




153. Sioux VbXIb 


10 




10 


■ • 


10 


• • 


10 


• m 


10 


• • 


• • 


10 


10 .. 


10 


• • 


10 




154. Lincoln 


13 




13 


« • 


13 


• m 


13 


• • 


13 


• • 


13 


• • 


12 .. 


13 


m • 


2 


12 


15.«». Mt- Pleasant 


5 




5 


■ « 


5 


• • 


5 


• • 


5 


• ■ 


• • 


5 


6 .. 


5 


m m 


« • 


6 


156. SufBeld 


14 




7 


5 


12 


1 


12 


1 


■ • 


13 


13 


10 


2 .. 


11 


1 


8 


6 


157. Rockford 


4 


2 


6 


• • 


3 


• 3 


4 


2 


2 


4 


• • 


6 


6 .. 


6 


• • 


• ■ 


6 


158. Lafayette 


7 


• • 


7 


■ ■ 


7 


« • 


7 


• ■ 


7 


• • 


7 


• • 


7 .. 


7 


• • 


7 


• • 



CIOAB UAXBBS' OFFICIAL JOUBNAL 



Sacie. 8M.E1. BeeU. ^ao. 

No.IÍ. No.ïl. No.íS. ^No.: 

i. TeiNo. Ves.No YeB.-So " - 



lao.64. 
Jo. 3 Z. 
Yea. No, ' 



SacM. 8M.14S. SBcMfi. 
No. BT. N0.7Ï. No.74, 
ïeB.No. Tea. No. Yea.No. 



12 .. 12 



18 1 2 19 11 



18 101 El 75 



.. 12 

7 

11 24 



3 120 3 112 



CIQAB MAEEBS' OFFICIAL JOUBNAL 



23 



259. 

260. 

261. 

262. 

263. 

264. 

265. 

266. 

267. 

268. 

269. 

270. 

271. 

272. 

273. 

274. 

276. 

276. 

277. 

278. 

279. 

280. 

281. 

282. 

283. 

285. 

IS6. 

287. 

288. 

289. 

290. 

291. 

292. 

293. 

294. 

295. 

296. 

297. 

298. 

299. 

300. 

301. 

S02. 

303. 

}04. 

Ï05. 

^06. 

507. 

308. 

309. 

310. 

311 

?12. 

313. 

514. 

Sl.^î. 

3J6. 

317. 

^18. 

320. 

3?t. 

* • to' ^« 

3?3. 
324. 
32.=>. 
?.?«. 
327. 

•20. 
?30. 
<?1. 
332. 
?33. 
?34. 
?35. 
33«. 
337. 
339. 
340 
.341. 
342. 
344. 
.34 S. 
'?47. 
34«. 

.'ÎK1. 
352. 
SS3. 



Bloominffton 

Plqua 

KnozviUe 

Dallas .1 

Adrian 

Rutland 

Waverly 

Memphis 

Sumneytown 

Escanaba 

Nashua 

Ft. Dodge 

Rochester 

Lansingr 

Rockland 

Pekln 

Aberdeen 

Plattsmouth 

Oskaloosa 

Londoh 

Plattsburg 

Owego 

St. Louis 

Bridgeport 

Geneva 

Ft. Worth 

Wichita 

Marinette 

Manhelm 

Miami 

Janesvllle 

?!an Jose 

Brooklyn 

Ft. Smith 

Duluth 

Scranton 

Wilmlngrton 

Canton 

Glens Falls 

Middleton 

Michigan City. . . . 

Akron 

Tecumseh 

Perkasie 

Racine 

Monmouth 

Pueblo 

Reno 

Munde 

Rothsville 

Manistee 

Auburn 

Livingston 

Lima 

Jackson 

St. Cloud 

McShcrryston 

Wllkesbarre 

Chattanooga 

Athens 

New Britain 

JopIIn 

Sheboygan 

Gloucester 

Spokane 

Taunton 

Coxsackie 

Crestón 

Fond du Lac 

Alpena 

Crookston 

San Diego 

San Lorenzo 

Saratoga 

Hammond 

Key West 

TCokomo 

Traverse City 

Neenah 

Batavia 

Atlant.i 

Kansas City 

Fargo 

Cornřn£T 

Manatí 

Mankato 

Brookvllle 

Louisiana 



Sec.l2. 


Sec. 45. 


Sec.54. 


Sec. 55. 


Sec. 64. 


Sec. 64. 


Sec94. Sec. 146. 


Sec.146. 


No.lO. 


No.19. 


No.21. 


No.25. 


No.32. 


No.33. 


No.Ď-i 


r. N0.73. 


N0.74. 


Yes.No. 


Yes. No. 


Tes. No. 


Ye8.No. 


Yes. No, Yes.No. 


Ye8.N( 


î. Yes. No. 


Yes.No. 


7 




7 


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7 


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ft a 


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6 




5 


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5 


ft a 


6 


ft • 


3 


2 


3 


2 


5 . 


6 


• 9 


5 .. 


4 




4 


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4 


ft ft 


4 


ft • 


4 


ft ft 


4 


.. * 


4 . 


4 


ft • 


4 


15 




15 


ft ft 


15 


ft ft 


15 


ft ft 


15 


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15 


ft ft 


15 . 


. 15 


• • 


15 .. 


4 




4 


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4 


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4 


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1 


3 


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3 


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8 


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23 


17 . 


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ft ■ 


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7 .. 



CIÛAE MAKEBS* OFFICIAL JODBNAL 



No.lO. 
Yea.No. ' 

I. Key West 26 . . 

1. fttiatk» 10 

I. Vaueouver 20 

1. Fremont 12 . . 

Í Delaware ".'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 7 '.'. 

'.. Grent Fallu 7 .. 

I. Waukeaba .. 

1. Havanu 12 ,. 

■, ÜBden -¿î .. 

i. Port Huron IS .. 

). Jamestown 10 .. 

.. Barre 6 .. 

:. Marshneid 7 .. 

1. Sherbrooke 10 .. 

I. Anaconda 14 . . 

;. Utuado 44 I 

I, Brandon fi .. 

I, Roctieater 18 

I Wallace • .. 

.. Walertown 16 1 

!. Ruitivllle 10 .. 

I, St. AuguBtLne 42 

I. Clalea , 21 .. 

'. Tankton 7 .. 

I. Utuado 7 .. 

!. Lakeland 9 .. 

I, CadllUc 7 .. 

1. Sycamore 15 .. 

I. Watortmry IS .. 

I. Nortbamplon 13 

. Ionia 12 ., 

:. Stamford 8 . . 

I. Vlncennea 7 

I. Red Wing 9 

;. Quakertown 17 .. 

:. Isbpemlng IE 

. BlrmlnBhani 7 

1. c - « 

. N ... 30 .. 



;. Sec.54. ffetSS. 
. No.21. No.2â. 
I. Ye». No. Yea. No. 



427. B 

428. T 



... 10 

4'!0. Fulton 10 

431. Ulchfleld 10 

tn. Nelson S 

433. Mobile 10 

4Í4, Faribault 10 

4SS. Kenton 4 

4S7. Cairo 7 

429, Carbondale 

441. t-lttle Rock B 

412. Cfipe (ilrardeau. .. f> 

44Ä. íllíiiquernue 7 

4«. Walla Walla 10 . 

44R. BIlllnSB 

446. NorrlBlown fi 

447. Venosha 1Î 

448. Brnlnerd 6 

«fió; nklHhoma'üii'i" ü' 

4K1. Riiítinell 7 

4'm'. Cedar Rápida!]^!! 11 '; 

4SB. (îalena 7 

IR«. Albla 10 

i'7. nrnfon Harbor 

4.;Í8. r-ldra 21 

IM. 'pnn jtían .:;:.::: '■■ 

4M. Wmi Tampn * 4; 

4fiJ Pontiac 7 

4C5. Quebec S 



17 .. 
10 '.'. 



I, Yes.No. Yei.No. 



21 .. Ï1 .. 



29 10 Zo 



6 1« 5 17 



Yes.No. Yel.No. 



. . 12 12 

SO Ü 26 38 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



25 



Sec.l2. Sec.45. Sec.64. S'ec.SB. S'ec.64. Sec.64. 8ec.94. Sec. 145. Sec.146. 

No.lO. No.19. No.21. No.25. No.32. No.3S. No.67. No.73. No.74. 

Ye8.No. Yes.No. Tes.No. Yes.No. Yes.No, Yes.No. Yea.No. Yes.No. Yes.No. 

466. S&ston 8 .. 8 .. 8 .. 8 .. 8 «• 8 .. 8 .. 8 .. .. 8 

467. Ârcelbo 2s . . 8 32 13 S 1 29 39 . . 40 . . 23 . . 29 . . . . 40 

468. Albion 10 . . . . 10 10 . . . . 10 10 . . 5 5 10 . . 10 . . 10 . . 

469. Bakersñeld 12 3 9 12 . . 12 .. ..12 ..12 12 .. 12 .. 1 11 

170. Portland 7.. 7.. 7.. 7.. .. 7 .. 7 7.. 7.. 7.. 

471. Macon 14 . . 14 . . 14 . . 14 . . 1 13 14 . . 14 .. 14 .. 1 X3 

472. Juncos 34 11 42 3 30 15 25 2d 40 5 45 .. 45 .. 50 . . ..50 

473. Calcrary 6 1 10 . . 10 . . 10 . . 9 1 10 . . 10 . . 10 . . 10 . . 

475. Fltchburg: 17 .. 17 .. 17 . . 17 .. 17 .. 17 .. 17 .. 17 .. ..17 

476. Pontiac 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. Cw.. 6.. 

477. Manitowoc 8.. 8 .. 8.. 8 .. 8 .. 8 8.. 8.. 8.. 

478. La Orangfe 3.. .. 3 3.... 3 3.. 3.. 3.. 3.. 3 

479. Wheeling 7.. 7.. 7.. 7.. 7.. 7.. 7.. 7.. 7.. 

481. Bayamon 140 5 10 150 137 15 136 5 149 15 140 14 130 5 160 10 5 140 

482. Wausau 28 . . 28 .. 28 .. 28 .. 26 2 20 8 28 .. 28 .. 3 32 

483. Gloversville 13 . . 5 6 13 . . 13 .. 13 . . . . 13 13 . . 13 . . 12 I 

484. Merlden 15 . . 13 . . 11 . . 12 . . 6 6 . . 16 15 . . 11 . . 8 2 

485. Augrusta 7.. 7.. 7.. .. 7 7.. 7.. 7.. 7.. 7.. 

486. New Westminster 10 1 11 .: 11 .. 11 .. ..11 ..11 9 .. 9 .. 4 6 

487. Baker 10 3 13 . . 7 6 10 1 2 11 9 4 13 . . 7 . . 2 6 

488. Middletown 16 . . 16 .. 1 15 16 .. 16 .. ..16 16 16 

489. lola 5 .. 5 .. 5 .. 5 ». 5 .. 5 .. 6 .. 5 .. 5 

490. Fairfleld 7.. .. 7 7.. .. 7 .. 7 .. 7 7.. 1 6 .. 7 

491. Huron .1 U 2 12 S 11 1 13 ..14 4 10 6 5 6 3 1 9 

492. Colorado Springs . 5.. 5.. 5.. 5.. 5.. 5.. 5.. 5.. 5.. 

494. Fall River 12 . . 12 . . 12 . . 12 . . 12 '.. 12 .. 12 .. 12 .. 12 .. 

495. MarshaUtown .... 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 
496 Waterloo 8.. 8 8.. 8.. 3 5 3 5 8.. 8.. 8 

497. Kankakee 6.. 6.. 6.. 6.. 6 .. 6 6.. 6.. .. 6 

498. Everett 14 .. 14 .. 14 .. 14 .. .. 14 .. 14 14 .. 14 .. 14 .. 

499. Trinidad 6 5 3 11 14 .. 12 2 14 .. 14 .. 14 .. 12 .. 8 4 

500. Tampa 230 16 217 28 215 . . 101 189 11 288 119 . . 820 . . 2 327 3 826 

Total 67712862 6636 4329 6197 3427 66778222 4574 5635 4106 6666 8469 209 70601080 36706100 

« 

The foUowlngr returns were received after the time limit had expired and could not be counted. 

However, they would not have changed the result." 

Sec.12. Sec.46. Sec.64. S'ec.56. Sec.64. Sec.64. Sec.94. Sec.146. Sec.146. 

No.10. No.19. No.21. No.25. No.32. No.33. No.67. No.73. No.74. 

YeB.No. Yes.No. Yes.No. Yes.No . Yes.No, Ye8.No. Yes.No. Yes.No. Yes.No. 

12. Oneida 93 . . 19 93 • 55 22 25 69 84 15 ..168 65 .. 72 1 7 95 

48. Toledo 1 23 ..21 1 21 22 . . 2 19 .. 25 24 .. 16 . . ..16 

147. Union Hill 23 .. ..22 ..22 25 . . 25 . . ..24 

184. Bay City 23 .. 23 . . 5 18 3 20 ..23 ..23 21 .. 21 . . 16 6 

190. Gurabo 20 . . 20 . . 20 .. 20 . . 20 .. 20 . . 20 .. 20 '. . ..20 

196. Grand Island 5.. 5.. 6.. 6.. 5.. 5.. 5.. 5.. 5.. 

201. Rock Island 13 ..13 ..13 ..13 ..13 ..13 13 .. 13 %.. 10 3 

215. Logansport 23 3 10 16 26 . . 11 15 ..26 ..26 9 .. 10 . . ..10 

234. Guttenberg 12 . . 6 7 12 .. 6 6 ..12 ..12 12 .. 12 .. ..12 

404. Austin 5.. 5.. 5.. 6.. 5.. 6.. 5.. 5.. 6.. 

438. Marlon 9.. 9.. 9.. 9.. 9.. 9.. 9.. 9.. .. 9 

464. Pensacola 8.. 8.. 8.. 8.. 8.. 8 8.. 8.. 

9 

Totals 199 39 104 150 146 74 137 123 13Í 130 47 279 208 ~ 216 ""Î "sî 195 

349. St. John — Voted "yes" without specifsring the number of votes. 
413. Calumet— Voted a blank ballot. 



INTERNATIONAL FINES 

The International Executive Board approved 
the application of 110 Washington, D. C.» to 
fine Frank Harper. 98609: Frank Riley, 108285, 
and James A. Williams, 5079, for working in the 
Ofterdinger shop, but reduced the fines from 
1200 each to $100 each. Following is the vote: 
Affirmative — 4; Negative — 1. One member ap- 
proved 1100 fines and one member approved 150 
fines. 

Approved the application of 33 Indianapolis to 
fine Henry Greenwald, 20207, for selling union 
labeled cigars for $15 per thousand, but reduced 
the fine from S250 to 1100. Following is the 
vote: Affirmative — 3; three members favored 
1100 fine: one member favored $25 fine and SlOO 
deposit if first offense, and $50 fine and $100 
deposit if second offense; and one member voted 
fn accordance with Section 158. 

Approved the application of 1 Baltimore to fine 
Wm. Fabor $50 for taking a job in a strike 
■hop. Following is the vote: Affirmative— 7; 
negative — 0. 

Approved the application of 146 New Brun- 
swick to fine U Kaiman, 20251, $26 for scabbing. 



Following is the vote: Affirmative— 6; negative 
—0. 

Approved the application of 83 Nashville, 
Tenn., to fine Mike i>ajiaher. 17166. $25 for al- 
lowing himself to be suspended, and leaving 
board bill and conduct unbecoming a gentleman. 
Following is the vote: Affirmative — 6; nega- 
tive— 0. 

Fines of $10 or Less. 

Mr. B. W. Schilling was fined $10 by 158 La- 
fayette for employing a scab painter to paint 
his i^lace of business. 

Union 83 Nashville, Tenn., fined August Jun- 
gell, 1724, and N. Blrnwald, 88958, each $10 for 
allowing themselves to be suspended. Union 77 
Minneapolis, Minn., fined F. A. Stromgulse, 
22867, $5 for allowing himself to be suspended. 

Union 466 Easton, Pa., fined Albert Miner, 
20674, $5 for allowing himself to be suspended. 

Note — Mr. J. F. Tyrell, 35905, announces to his 
friends that he is not the J. C. Tyrell fined at 
118, Peoria, as published in the December, 1912. 
Journal. 

Union 471, Americus, Oa., fined the following 
members each $6 for allowing themselves to be 
suspended: Theopas Swain (124766) and Albert 
U Fowler (27614). 



CISAB MAEKBS' OFIIOIAL JOÜBNAL 



AMENDMENTS ADOPTED 

TbB total aggreBBite vote up 
nient adopted by the Baltimore 
■uDmlttea to poimlar vote, la a 



ä s 













No. or r-Ho. vote« 

Arndt. To — For. Ajï'iu 

Si. Section 1Ů S T.2Z0 1.3 

»«. Section 15S 7,0« S 

dj. Öectlon 1Ä6 T.BSO 4 

SM. SecUon 1S7 6,331 3,2 

SB. SectonlSM 8.02S 1 

90. Sect on 16U S,16ti 3 

"' -ecton 181 7,7ï9 2 



12 8.83« 











































































in 


::::::::: fíi 



Section 
Section 
Section 
Section 
Section 
Heotlon 



5.B8J 2,071 



S,295 

7.408 

7,494 

8,0«4 

A 7,450 



IE 7,080 



le 3.670 5, 



Ifl 6,813 



»2. 



S.3e<l »9. SecUon 

E25 100. Sect 



_6B 7,708 

Section 177 7.210 

Sect on 179 7.601 



I Í13 7.865 



6,833 1,411 



398 we publlab elaewhere U 

386 vote of local unlona on ...^ 

4,329 «oniB of which Involve the ,... _ 

363 and others such as the Claaa A plan, and the 

3.427 extension of time In the payment of death 

3,013 beDeflta, All amendments were adopted except 

2.385 that to SecUon 64, reference Class A. to Seclloa 

2.853 64, striking out the OptlonaJ Clause, and to Bee- 

3.332 Hon 146 eitendlns the time on death benellts. 
3.08» I 

11 BUREAU OF INFORMATION 



6.^36 Tlmmlns. 

!,5SS Ray Bndreas, ED7 Chandler street. Top ska. 

.817 Kan., wants to hear from T. Endreas. 

8>2 John Cook Is requested to correspond with 

842 hU broth«T Charles. Any secretary or member 

1.066 havlnc any knowledge of his, whereabouts for 

"hV" Worrell Is "requested "FÔ'êorrBSpoud" with 



Barali J. Borer. 12G E^reret street, Kansas 
City. Kan., would like to hear from her son. 
Harry Allen. Any one knowing of his wbere- 

B knowing the whereabouts of Kdward 



) him. 



. .. ...e death of hla 

■ Information of In- 

. Sllverberg (care of Hr. E. Qreenberger, 
JUS ciut 76tti street. New York, N. T., or CB,re 
of David lievy, 953 Third avenue, New York. 
N. 7.). whose mother !s dead, would Ilka to 
hear from his father, William Sllverberg or 
Bltver, who, when last heard from, stated thai 
he was going out west. Very Important newa. 

Steve Quirk wants to hear from William K. 
Walsh, In Mancheater, N. H.; 7-Ï0-4 factory. 

Mra. Ia Johnson, 223 Kast Fourth South street. 
Bait lAke City. Utah, would like lo hear from 
Joe Tuttle In reference to unpaid board bill 
~ ~ ■ ■ ■ heard of In Chicago. 

_b" appreciated. 

Any secretary holding the card of Ernest A 
Olson {60363), or any other person knowing of 
his whereabouts, please notify his brother, O.tto 



Edward H. Nace, formerly of Quakertown 
would like to hear from W. S. Kelter. Address 
care of Union 33, Indianapolis. 

A. C. Bateman would litte to know the where- 
abouts of P. J. RoBBier. Address care of Union 

L. would Ilite to hear from Adam I^irer. ' 



1 Railroad Building, Denver, CoIoT 



CIGAB MAKEBS' OFFICIAL JOUENAL 



Un. Potter, RIdout ilraet, I^ndoii, Ontario, 
wIshM to hear from J. O^earn <isi25), Q. 
KrelE <8tTE9), Fred QelB (TOTtg), J. Cary 
(115ñí), J. Purtell (8860), C. Toaaendorf msaf" 
F. McOaw (lliesi), A. F. Mltcball W. 



F. McOaw (lliesi), A. F. Mltcball, W. A. 
Ttiynne and Oeorge Shanahan. By Union S78. 

Wmiam Schrlver oí 67, ChamiialBii, would like 
to hear from Spencer Dukea. 

LoulH Knocke wishe« to haar from Bonnie 
Cutler. Address Box 41. Blko. Nev. 

Claud O. Jetter, 116 South 12tti street. Lin- 
coln, Neb., would like to bear from his brother, 
a. C. Jetter. 



Paul knorr. 

LETTER BOX 

Note. — Letter* remaining uncalled for at the 



waahJnstoii, 

Returned the following to Poatofflce Depart- 
ment alnce the l»»t Uaue ot Journal— James F. 
Thomas. 

Union 199, Mlddletown, Conn.. lor A. Reachard 
(>3>78). 

Union SE7, Vancouver. B, C, for P. Joat (lt03). 

Union 114. Jacksonville, Ut., for J. BTberbardt. 

Union 414, Winnipeg, Canada, for A. Flerlns 
and Eïusens Ia Hears. 

Union 14, Chicase IlL. for Edward Ouenther. 
Jamea Hart. Clarence Larion, Oeorge McPhar- 
lan. Paul Van Warnick, John Valentine. James 
HonlitnBon, Joseph H. Byrnes. 

International olBce, for James LonE, Uath 
Sehend, Edward Koehnleln, □. O. Cobb. Nicholas 
J. Schrolner. William Nlenberger and James 
Ward. 

Union 363, Louisiana, Mo., for F. W. Felre. 

Union 44, St Louis. Mo. for E. J. GaUaghpr, 
John Wilkes. Joe Adolph and William Smith. 



<EvIdently parties who are decelvInK ths 
members by claiming lost cards. It Is auKKested 
that where parties report losa and are not known 
the description above requested be slvaB.) 



UNION NOTES 

Notes by 8T, Boston. — Our label committee 

S laced an ad of our label In the organ oí the 
tock E^chanse. The president and a' member 
of committee addressed the wholesale Uqunr 
dealers. Executive board bouxhl 1.000 Red 
Cross stamps. Now that election and voting on 
new constitution has taken place, let us stand 
together to build up the craft. I stIU believe 
In cuttinc out the tlOO. t3S0 and I6£0 Insurance 
and levy an asieaament of tl a quarter asd 
increase the death benefit to tl.OOO, and ksep 
the money In a separata fund and pay ail who 
¿ave been continuous members for one year or 
over, tl.OOO, providing they have paid Si weeks' 
dues and all death assessments. It above assess- 
ments do not cover liabilities then International 
president may, with the consent of the inter- 
' executive board, levy one or more as- 
a In April. October or July. Think It 
uter. .Liie minimum wage for women Is a step 
In the right direction. Those who fear that no 
more will be paid, forget that we always move 
forward. There are too many trade unions with- 
out a sick or death benefit. How do they ex- 
pect to hold their membersT Why have some 
organlsatloils two ciaases of membersT Are 
they successfuIT We are to advertise the label 
In all the movlng-plcture houses. Again If you 
want to succeed, deserve It. -'Verdicts of Jurors 
and charges of Judges are not always conclu- 
sive." — Note. Indianapolis. Massachusetts will 
have an eight-hour law that can be enforced on 
all city work. The trades union Is not a close 
corporation. We will organise all the workers. 
We will reduce the hours of labor. We will get 
a living wage. The Prussian Ministry for Rail- 
ways has at every Important depot a magnlfl- 
cently built and appointed car for sick persons; 
containing spring beds and every medical de- 
vice. The child should not breathe the stifling 



DECISIONS OF PRESIDENT 

Correction. — The decision In the case of O. J. 
Dunster'B appeal against Î38. ^cramento, pub- 
lished in the December Journal, should have 
' s follows: "O. J. Dunster appealed against 
"3S. Sacramento, for compelling him ta 
ain denclency assessments. The appeal 



C'nion 23S. Sacramento, for compellli 

pa); certain defti-' '- " 

was sustained." 



If a 



LOST CARDS 

reports loss of card the secretary 



should obtain: 

t. F^II name and number. 

1. Date and place of Initiation. 

1. Place where card was last deposited. 

4. Amount due on card, as near u remem- 
bered. 

In addition. If the claimant Is not known lu 
you. add a description of party claiming loss, 

Î70Î!. — Leo N. Oliver; Initiated January S, 
IS1Í. at 1»2; lost December IS. Reported by ES. 



íept, 21, 1892, at SB; 



ES407— M. Mullin, Initl 
lost Jan. 9, 1313; report 

63206— Martin Clark, Initiated August 13, IBIO, 
at 410. lost January 15, 1»13. Reported by'144. 

2ÍÍS.— Charles Newton. No such party Inltlat- 



worklng hour* at SIS Wyandotte l .— 

loaflng at the factory allowed. 

Union 157, B Id like to hear 

from William Í). 

Fecretary of will not grant 

loans during w 

If Mr. AugUB does not settle 

up with 414. 1 id for his card 

w^lch he left I vlth a 37 board 

bill, the union at once. 

If G. Grenol (7Z2S) does not send for his card 
at once. Union 414 wIU probably take action. 

Secretary of IT, Cleveland. O.. wish» to as- 
certain the present address of Ell Masco (84198). 
Any secretary knowing same Is requested tu 
forward It. 

Union 263. Oakland, wishes to hear from the 
following: David Williams (BSSB4), Ike Weg- 
man (113812). H K. Kaiser (IBSIZ). and Paul 
Apel. Important. 

^Vllllam Hibbard (42(28) Is requested to cor- 
respond with Union I8T, Owosso. Mich., before 
next Issue of the JoumaL 

Union 100, EdferCon, Wis., wants to hear 
from F, Easter (S8I28). M. Mullen (63*07), last 
call; William Smith (93007), and H. Koheneros. 

Union 331 would like to hear from Mr. La 
Chapelle (S2764) and O. Cyr (16822) In regard 
to loans they have coming. 

Will the secretary holding card of Randall 
Hovd (105343) please collect Tioar" "■'" *-- 



1 99. Ottawa, for o 
e to r " 



all yearv, and [ 



trade la good thei_ 

Union 373, Brandon, requeats any secretary 
holding card of W, B. East to notify him tc 
correspond with Union 3T3. Very Important. 



OlGAK MAKEBS" OFFICIAL JOÜKNAL 



Secretarles bol dins CHjds oí the follow Ins 
pleaa« collect and remit to Ualon Z7E. Aberdeen. 
~ the ioUowlii ftmounla: Phil Kempf 



PRIVATE LOANS 

, AJl memben owlnr private loans to !37. Hunt- 
Ineton, Ind.. wilt please remit or their names 
«lU be put Id the Journal. 

Members owIdb private loans to Z8E. Fort 
Worth, Tei. pleaaa remit bjr February 1, 1913, 
or names wilt be published In next Journal. 

Union ibl, Bonton Harbor, Mich., will «rant 
no private loans until those indebted to the 
union remit. 

Union 76. Haiinlbal, Mo., would like to hear 
rrom Aloruo McQloason (63143) In reference to 

(7T6Ï7),_ 



Union 4Î9; also secretary hold _ _ _ __ 

J>ayton 088ZO. Initiated by ÎBB, Lowell, Mass.. 
please collect jsrl vale loan ol tl granted him by 
42», Niagara Falls. 
^ Union 140. Et. Catharines, hereby luspends 



relary holdlnx card please t 



e published 1 

Union JEl, Mankato, requeats the followlng 
members lo send In private loans granted them, 
as we must bave Ihe money: Lew M. Agnea 
I9ST48), ZEc: Daniel Kautz (9433S), on due book. 
îôe: William Kasper (83S83)_. tl.&O; Dennis Oar- 
ver [1()433S), tl.EO; Phil KempF (4S381). 60c: 
Joseph Krteclns (20I8T). 600; Frank J. Krteclns 
(9G4S6), aOc: M. E. Pace (1D8700), 50c; Frank 
Mott (ÍBZE1), BOc. 

Secretaries holdlnic cards of the following 
named members please collect private loans of 
ÏÎ each and forward to Union 488, New West- 
minster, B. C: George Sehm (E&S93). C. O. 
*-ost6r (113633), J. Warden (101991), M. W. Bal- 
four (119065), F. Schatter (lOOOD), A. H. Meyer 
129021), William Nelson (1DG2S1), Lee »crryman 
ri03104i, H. Gold (13Pf), SamusI P. Trimmer 
171423), Bernard Lund (168491). 

Secretaries holding the cards of the following 
named members please collect private loans 
opposite tbeir names and forward to Union 1Z9, 
Denver, Colo, řome of these members have 
been suspended since receiving the loans and 
the numbers may not apply to them, some of 
the loans having been standing for 12 lo IS 
years: E. R. Murphy (115702), |3.D0; H. M. 
Good (S3280), »IS: M. W. Balfour (119066). Ï2: 
J. J. Monahan (65S42), t2: J. J. Pollard (86880), 
13: C. W. Baatberg (S69E1), Jï; J. A. Rhelm 
(31301). 13; D. Oreenberg (lEg4), tlE; F. R. Mc- 



I Ratner (36252), 



Union 23E, Peru. Ind., would like to bear from 
John Rupple (31078); also Ed. Brehn (S2480). 

Clgarmakers coming through providence will 
not be recognised without their cards. 

Secretary holding card of Eddie Braddy notify 
Union 191, Morris, III. 

Union 177, Council Bluffs, would like to hear 
from Edward Cornish 81802. Important. 

T. F. Fltigerald 1Q8S93 was suspended and 
fined Í10.00 for allowing himself to become sus- 
pended, and 18.99 local Indebtedness cliarged 
against him, (4,00 (or board and Í4.90 for dues 
and aseessments. which Union 10, Providence, 
R. I., paid out for blm to give him a chance 
to redeem himself. If the above member ap- 
plies (or membership please collect and for- 
ward the local Indebtedness to Union 10. 



Uoro (123E7), IID; £. W. Fair (S7338), tSS. 



(77957), 84; 
[I1906E). 14; 
(1047), tZ; 
on (106281). 
■ (71423), »3; 

... |!0. 

Union 835, Spokane, Wash., must hear from 
the following members with reference to un- 
paid private loans. Secretaries holding these 
cards will confer a favor by advising us; John 
Harmon. Fred Lechman. Charles Eastberg, 
Patsy M. Cardie. Thomas Tuttie, Jai —-"--i 



William Kur _. _. .._. 

hind; E. Johnson, Gustave Mat tison. James 
Kirchendorf er, Ed Boogly, A. J. Collins, Herman 
Brake, E. A. Haagle, Frank Hickey, C. O. 
Foster. 

Secretaries who hold cards of the following 

Union 331, New Britain, Conn.: T. E. Cum- 
mings (9101), D. De Lent (EE606), A. M. PurteU 
(2SE18), H. 3. Miller (66E98), J. 8ents (84696). 
F. G. funding (48398). W. E. Connor (84743). 
Thomas Sylv& (3S508). and M. Fay (4179E). 
tl.90; George Mann (31377), SE; John Connora 
(612ZC), t11.3D. 



IN MEMORIAM 



-lumber, date and 

of Initiation of member. Has member 
retiring cardT If so. did he pay hia dues 
Information relates only to such r* — 



e when and wher 



mSkl 



t record. Before 
>.»j...a -^«.v.. bptients atuciv "" " ""'" 

161, Inclusive. ,._,„., 

fllled out tor all death bcnedta paid. 

The following unions adopted resolutions of 
respect and condolence relating to death or 
deaths as follows, and ordered charter draped 
In mourning tor thirty days: 

Union 2E, Milwaukee, Wis— Wllllajn Lange 
(4S001). who died December 81, and Christina 
Strerath (4796B), who died December 25. 

Union 92, Worcester, Mass.— Thomas H. Ryan 
(85801, who died September 24 at his home In 
Southbrldge. Mass. Committee from union at- 
■ nded funeral. Dan P. Ryan (38500), who died 



tended services 



Delegation from the 



aette General Hospital, under 



allon. His burial i 



Ther 



Colo. — Joseph Kroeger 



mptlbic 






pie who under the guise c. ,.., „ 

Blander and falsehood in the hope 
of il will stick and perhaps help a { 

etipoiiBe or assist Ihem In some selDsh i 

Men nf this type have neither character nor 
hoiiemv and will betray friend or foe when It 
suits their purpose. Look out tor them, as for 
aught you know tkey may be In the employ 
of some association paid to stir up strife among 



CIGAB MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



29 



LIST OF SECRETARIES 

« 
The first name is that of the Corresponding and the second that of the Financial Secretary. 

Secretaries niarked thus: 

• Will NOT grant loans during working hours. 
t Have regular headquarters. 
§ Are cigar packers. 

Note — Changes in secretaries or addresses sb'>uld be reported at once, and all changes should 
reach this ofiSce not later than the 10th OP EACH MONTH TO INSURE PUBLICATION 
in the current issue. 



ALABAMA. 

219 Albert Laland. 006 Selma st.. Mobile. 

Fred Hawkins. 117 Fisher alley. Mobile. 
•405 And7 Marx. 1720^ Ist ave.. Box 018. Blrmingbam. 
*4S3 Chaa. Peteraon, 538 So. Scott at.. MobUo. 

ABIZONA. 

ISO M. G. Famham. 121 N. Ist ay.. Phoenix. 

ABEAVBA8. 

117 Otto Pitta, 518% E. 3â ave.. Pine Bluff. 
303 H. Wood. 818 Garrison aye.. Fort Smith. 
441 F. FredericksoD. 1215 E. 13th st.. Little Uock. 

CAUFOBKIA. 

*225 W. G. Fenn. Room 103. Labor Temple. Los Angelea 
t228 Chas. Drábek. 1676 Clay st.. San Francisco. 
Henry Ibanes. 1018 Powell st., San (Yuncisco. 

288 Abe BilTerstone, Box 7. Sacramento. 
t2S3 A. Anderson. 668 67th st.. Oakland. 

291 F. J. Hepp. Box 1, Labor Temple. San Jose. 
•332 Thos. Steigerwald, 857 4th st., San Diego. 

338 Chas. Stebbins, Box 264, Eureka. 

408 Jacob Zimmer, Box 472, Bakersileld. 



m 

•55 

158 
•59 
140 

•211 
278 
:uu 
357 

•:;7a 
378 
411 
414 

•420 

422 

•424 

•4:0 

458 

461 
4^ 
473 

486 



CAVADA. 

Joh]4 Pamphilon, Boom 106, 88 Church at., Toronto, 
Ont. 

F. Hough. 170 Duke at.. Hamilton. Ont. 

A. Oariepy, 238 Are. Hotel de Ville. Montreal. 

F. Mather, 7S Greenwich st.. Brantford. Ont. 

Leo T. Coy le, 138 Church st.. St. Catherines, Ont. 

J. U Smith. 2515 Rose st.. Vlctorln. B. C. 

J. McKenzie,. 110 Dundas st., London, Ont. 

J. J. DonaT'jn. 68 Moure st.. St. John. N. B. 

Bobt. J. Craig, care Kurts & Co.. Vancuuver. 

J. C. Gossellu, 50 Marquette st., Sherbrooke. Que. 

Wm. H. Boreskie. 1046 4th st., Brandon, Man. 

Jas. Grantham, Box 50. Brockville. Ont. 

Lem A. Bigue. 84 Granville st.. Winnipeg. 

Fred Roberta. 4 Balfour at., Box 154, St. Thomas. 
Ont. 

S. Welhenser. Troy at., Berlin, Ont. 

Jume» Hagarty. 178 St. DaTld at.. Stratford, Ont. 

H. S. Pike. Bos 783. Nelson, B. C. 

W. B. Bo3e, Saskatoon Cigar Factory, Saskatoon, 
Sa»^. _ 

J. G. Saugmoen, Box 812, Edmonton, Alta. 

M. Walsh. 1 St. James st., Quebec. 

E. J. Wendland, care of Calgary Cigar Co.. Cal- 
gary, AlU. 

Herman Knudaen, Box 618. New Westminster, 
B. C. 



COLORADO. 

tl28 J. W. Sanford. 201 Railroad bldg., Denrer. 

IG4 S. H. Manning. 140 N. College are.. Ft. Collins. 
•'Jt)e J. J. Llstřrman. 628 B. 3d st.. Pueblo. 

402 H. G. Sewell. 1530 Manitou avei, Box 862, Colo* 
rado Springs. 

499 James Daly, Box 874, Trinidad. 

comrECTicrrr. 

•2« Wm. F. Kom. 2 Burritt ave,. S. Norwalk. 

tío F. A. Grube, 23 Church st.. Box 979, New Haven. 

•42 Ell Brunell, 7 Central Row, Room 5. 2d floor. Box 

;{4.>. Hartford. 
I(t3 J. Zofirlcr. 18 Clifton ave.. Ansonia. 
138 CbM. G. Peet, Box 18, Long HiU. 



iriG J. L. Bamett. Box 32. Snffleld. 
*180 John H. Riley. 13 James at., Danbury. 
•282 Geo. Engelhard, 80 Edwin at., Bridgeport. 
•298 Chas. Anderson, Box 737, 166 Grand st.. Middle- 
town. 
*321 F. A. Goddard, 288 Main st.. Box 608, New 
Britain. • 

895 Val. Hahn. 27 Irion st.. P. O. Box 660, Waterbory. 
*3d8 John Bohl. 413 Main st.. Stamford. 
•407 R. A. Krohn. 1 Tyler ave.. Norwich. 
*484 F. Despin, 261 Broad st.. Meriden. 

OXTBA. 
151 Jose B. Melon, Aramburn 28, Habaim. 

DELAWARE. 
286 Chas. M. Hcrdman. 1025 Loverlng av.. Wilmington. 

DISTRICT OF COLXTMBIA. 

110 Ralph Allmutt, 810 E. Capitol sU, Washington. 
* W. Whitehead, 729 6th .at., S. E., Washington. 

FLORIDA. 

29 Joe L. Howard. 1032 W. Union St., Jacksonville. 
170 Peter Baker, Box 460, West Palm Beach. 
248 A. R. Cruz. 824 Albert st., Jacksonville. 
289 B. F. Corey. 512 Deleon ave., Miami. 

Wilson IMnder, 606 Ponceanna ave.. Miami. 
t*3S6 Fred Cruttenden. Box 434. Ybor City (Tampa). 
387 Wallace Plnder. 301 Elix. st.. Key West. 
354 Jose Alvarez. 419 Flomlug st.. Key West. 

Fernando Chili, 728 United st.. Key Weat. 
374 Rogelio Mlquell, Box 50, Key West. 
356 Miles P. Hunter, Box 176. Paáatka. 

Rogelio Miquqli, Duval st., 1128 Altos, Key West. 
•384 Walter Segui, Drawer 14, St. Augustine. 

Lawrence Pomar. Drawer 14. St. Augustine. 
392 W. S. Taylor, Box 94, Lakeland. 
462 R. Torres. Francis and Main sts.. Box 135, W. 

Tampa. 
464 Stephen Zaragoza. Box 333. Pensacola. 

L. A. Parody, Box 377, Pensacola. 
480 Claud Campbell. 34 W. Church st.. Orlando. 
500 Gerónimo Garcia. Box 102 (Ybw City). Tampa. 

Louis Ortega. P. O. Box 102 (Ybor City) Tampa. 

GEORGIA. 

•252 W. L. Harvey. 1915 Albany st.. Brunswick. 
344 Andrew L. Lee, 40 Bartow st.. Atlanta. 
390 H. B. Josey, Box 195, Valdosta. 
T. H. Wilcox, Box 185, Valdosta. 
471 W. B. Surles. Box 215, Amerlcus (Macon). 
478 R. R. Cone, 386 Broad st.. La Grange. 
485 Wm. Fix, care Wolfe A Lombard, 836 Broad st., 
Augusta. 

IDAHO, 
256 Geo. S. Anderson, Box 586. Boise. 
380 John L. O'Meara, care Wallace Cigar Co., Wallace. 

ILLINOIS. 

tl4 N. F. Lentz, 211 W. Madison st.. 2d fl., Chicago. 
tl5 August Geissler. S. E. cor. Randolph and Market 

sts., 2d floor, Chicago. 
•20 Chas. Wright, .'<2ü N. Water st.. Decatur. 
•38 H. BogaRke, 1120 S. 8th st.. Springfield. 
41 M. Rausch. 490 N. Lincoln ave.. Aurora. 
•Wm. Schlicht. 173 HInman st., Aurora. 
47 Charles L. Aldag, 1624 Spruce st.. Qulncy, 
•Ph, Cornelius, 925 Jersey st.. Quine;-. 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 

B. Gmo >!.. Dcbi», (Cbim- 



. Befbold. 21 Doui 



IM Bd U. Tim 



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101. W«etfteld. 
49 Wm. J. Uurpby. IS Baaton] il.. SrrliiK(li-ld. 

■I'lul H. abi'ibun, 49 Hiwtbornp m.. Surlnicfl-'Iil. 
•SI Albcrl ArclmsbaDll. T BpMiik >i.. Ilnlinkr. 

<:ii». O. Bemler. 84 LrniiD st.. Holfokc. 
•U n-. F. BUnier. Bl Wlllow «I.. LytiD. 



'. OS Ullr ■ 
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17 JuVrj V câpMi». 

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utIuB Tuilfbinj. 1102 ähelbr Ht.. VtDceimeB.' 
Vm, WwSworlb. 21S N. Oik «.. CrawřonUiLl 
obD HcOKfor. 123 E. UarlOD «t.. Blkbart. 



Ed. Scbrempf, 371 Bluff ■!.. nobaqlK. 



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CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 

39 CsJiitT *t.. Bouthlau. H£W YOBK. 



Ik.. Srncuic. 
IKI.'U. 

,"uall bide. Tro] 



fB. C. Hunier. »0 E. Elm 

•IS Jobn J. Bílil. M Cbiplii 
■S2 s. o. Cuibbcri. ISO w. g 

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•ee B. o. Edmi 
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103 A. J. 'Wtb* 
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Meredltb. ESI Eictainn 

'ÏMi ŘU Šcbilpb«''D. Olcm Kiln. 

•Sil Frank RIgbf. 28 CbMtnnt a(. 
827 J. B. Brcnrq, Jr.. Box 2. Coui 
SM W. A. Pbliip, 2 ClirlE lt.. Si 
342 Tbo>. Jordon, B<>i 400. B>tB> 
ilirsff. 101 Mj-rllc" 

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SOBTB DAKOTA. 
•In, 420 Ullla tT„ Farfo. 

OHIO. 

lUD. 2ZI3 Ontnno il,, Oenlind. 
Mi^r, tilli & 81. Clair >!■., Difton. 

r^r. S23M V/. HaiĎ >t.. SpHniOetd. 
letler, mi Noblo it., Tol«1n. 



tD2 e. Willlia 



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;, 709 nopblDI 
5 Br'b."KTërti"8H W, Maln°»l 
B PbDIp actiler. 1Î2 Gnirge il 
4 IUlld Brown, 91" W. Pe»rl 



32 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL ' 



OXLAHOXA. 
460 Da7 Wasbburn. 13 National bidg.. Oklaboma City. 



OREGON. 

•202 E. J. Stack, 270^ Alder nt.. Portland. 
426 J. A. D'Elia, 474 Commercial at., Astoria. 
487 J. F. Penrod, Box 164, Baker. 



PEHHSTLYAHIA. 

G3 Jas. F. Foley, 132 N« Center st.. Corry. 
(M Frank L. Flocken, R. F. D. 2, Box 16. Lebanon. 
82 Wm. Scbult^. Box 187, Penn at.. Meadyille. 
*91 Samuel A. Knaass, 164 Court st., Allentown. 
*104 S. M. F. Glover. 606 Sanderson st.. Pottaville. 
•107 Ed. Matlebner. 2628 Cocbran st.. Erie. 
*108 Lewis Young. 626 E. Bald Eagle st.. T.ock HaTcn. 
•122 E. J, Tribout, 20 Eddy st.. Warren. 
126 C. M. Hammond. 228 Washington av., Bphrata. 

F. B. Emig. 148 Washington ave.. Epbrata. 
146 W. Hoebener, 446 WyomTug st.. Williamsport. 
161 Chas. McNamee. Lock Bof 18. Denver. 
•John A. Mowrey, L. B. 26. DeoTer. 
tl66 M. C. Kreck. 282 N. 9tb st.. Philadelphia. 

Geo. H. Ullrich. 2S2 N. Otb st.. Philadelphia. 
•171 Albert Home. Box 144. E. Gretuvflle. 
•282 John H. Nase, 303 Washington ave.. SellersTille. 
236 Geo. Levy, 817 Court st.. Reading. 

ŤA. P. Bower, 111 N. 6th st., Uetiding. 
242 Chas. E. Rohler, 17 Sigsbee ave.. York. 

John B. Aumen. 717 Jessop pi.. York. 
244 A. E. Cook. 1021 N. 8d st., Harrisburg, 
267 S. B. Duke, 824 W. Walnut st., Lancaster. 

*J. P. Keenen. 481 High st., Lancaster. 
267 Irvln D. Rndy, B. D. No. 2. Green Lane (Sum- 

neytown). 
288 U. S. G. Witmyer, Hanhelm. 

•Chas. F. Floher. Maaheim. 
296 E. G. Kotxwlnkle. 419 Birch st., ficranton. 

•Daniel Harris, 12 Stoort av., Scranton. 
301 LeRoy Mohn. Box 46, Akron. 

Dan Smith, Lock Box 21, Akron. 
•308 Edgar Styer, 129 7th st.. Perkasie. 
309 Wilson Buck. Box 108, Rothsville. 

J. A. Shaar, Rotharllle. 
t316 Francis X. Colgan. Box 20. McSherrytown. 
•317 Frank Hochberg, 166 Blackman st.. Wllkes-Barre. 
•320 Earl Gotchius, 123 Herrlck st.. Athens. 
855 Wm. Kinslnger. 847 Main st., Honesdale. 
402 Walter Genszler, Box 82, Richland center (Qnaker- 
town). 
•Chas. Moyer, Box 82, Richland Center (Quaker- 
town). 
436 Frank Kelly, Delaware st.. Olyphant. 
•439 W. T. Held. 66 Pearl st.. Carbondale. 
•446 Sam C. Miller, 217 E. Otak st., Norriatown. 
•466 H. Ellenbcrger, general delirery, Easton. 



PÜSRTO BIOO. 

119 Ulises de Jesus, San Juan. 

Esteban Colon. San Augustin No. 101, Pta de 
Tierra San Juan. 
148 P. Vega Santos, Box 298, Caguas. 

A. Ferrer. Box 298, Caguas. 
190 Femando Marcano, Box 87, Gnrabo. 

Pedro Montanes, Calle de la Flores. Gurabo. 
194 Bernardo Vega. P. O. Box 8. Cayey. 

AB<ïlepiades Loi>es, Box 8, Cayey. 
338 Rafael R. Ramires. Luna st.. No. 37. San Lorenao. 

Jose G. Garcías, Lana st.. No. 37. San Lorenso. 
.^'SO Juan Gabriel, Box 2, Manatí. 

Jose Rosario, Box 2, Manatí. 
376 Mannet Lazus. Federacicm Libre, ütuado. , 

Antonio Roman, Federación Libre, ütuado. 
886 Angel Flgnerya. Cíales. P. R. 

M. Martines Rechani, Cíales, P. R. 
9388 Juan Vasques. Box 72. Ütuado. 

Andres B. Airares. Box 67, Ütuado. 
418 S^tnmino D. Santiago, Pahua st., Baramon. 

Herminio Sanche«. New Town. Bayamon. 
449 Eladio Ayala Moura. Flores. 82d st.. Ponce. 

Enrique Rami res, St. Castillo 38. Ponctv 
468 Angel M. Rivera, Comercio st.. Cidra. P. R. 

Juan R. ManJanarel, Calle "La Concha." Cidra. 
P. R. 
460 Francisco Pax Gránele. P. O. Box 807. San Juan. 

Jose RWas, P. O. Box 807, San Joan. 
467 Raimundo Colon. Box 837. Arecibo. 

Francisco Caban Acaba, Box 387, Arecibo. 
472 George Rivera. Federación Libre. Juncos. 

Augustin Miranda. Box 127. Juncos. 
474 Manuel Lopes Sanches. Box 298. Caguaa. 

Acisclo Glmenes. Box 298. Caguaa. 
481 Jone Vellón Fuentes. Box 163. Bayamon. 

Juan B. Sanches, Box 163, Bayamon. 



RHODE ZBLAKD. 

♦10 J. A. Allard. 1723 Westminster .«<t.. Providence. 
•94 A. E. Hohler, 128 Cileinvood uve.. Pawtucket. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

•163 John F. Glllberg, care Don Almo Cigur Co., Sloux 
Falla. ' 

275 Martin Hamelln. 301 1st ave. S. E.. Aberdeen. 
•387 Wm. Horst. 412 Mulberry st., Yankton. 

491 Geo. McMurray. Box 149, Huron. 



TENNESSEE. 

83 Paul Zwirner.. 212 Public sq., NaabriUe. 
•261 J. E. Levy, 129 Gay st., Knox ville. 
•206 A. H. Johnson, 243 N. 2d st., Memphis. 
318 Matt Gertach, 11 Market aq., Chattanoofa. 



TEXAS. 

128 M. Sanches, Box 673. El Paao. 

Trinidad Grits, Box 673, 310 Mills st.. El Paso. 

262 W. W. Bowen,. 22<)1 Elm st., Dallas. 
•285 M. Bloomberg. 209% W. 11th st.. Ft. Worth. 
•346 C. M. Gabbart, 233 S. Center st.. San Antonio. 

364 H. F. Wilson. Box 53. Nacogdoches. 
•360 Ed. C. Sevier. 123V4 E. Laiúar st., Sherman. 

404 Joe Amstead, 1500 Lavaca st., Austin. 



ITT AH. 

224 D. Sugden, 378 D st.. Box 664, Salt Lake City. 
367 E. J. Bcklnnd, Box 416, Ogden. 

VERMONT. 

•11 H. H. Holland. 64 Main st.. Box 118, St. Albans. 
18 D. H. MUler, Box 786. Brattleboro. 

264 John J. Toomey. 40 Wales st., Rutland. 
371 Wesley Hoffman, 366 N. Main st.. Barre. 
•421 Walter L. Boynton, 62 N. Union st., Burlingt(m. 

yi&GDrXA. 

133 N. J. Smith. 914 N. 28th st., Richmond. 
•198 J. L. Satterwbite, 101)^ Salem ave., Roanoke. 
240 E. T. Cañóles, care Old Dominion Cigar Factory, 
Norfolk. 
Geo. W. Keefe, 006 W. Highland are., Norfolk. 
•412 John G. Ross, 1222 26th st.. Newport News. 



\7ABHIK0T0N. 

•109 Albert Peterson, Box 826, Aberdeen. 
•118 Elmer Lewis, Box 881, Tacoma. 

188 Jos. Owens, 524 First ave.. S., Seattle. 

326 W. A. Mitchell. Bos 1844. 222 2d ave., Spokane. 
•9ui J. G. Duppen thaler. 843 Elk st.. Belllngham. 

444 Geo. Surbeck, 385 S. 2d st., Walla Walla. 

498 Jos. Tschida, 28U614 Oukes ave.. Everett. 



WEST YIXGZVIA. 

479 J. F. Helmbrlgbt. 1062 Main st.. Wheeling. 
John M. Schenk. 102 Alley 14, Wheeling. 

I 

« 

WISCONSIN, 

26 Fred M. Templtn, 2502 Lloyd st., Milwaukee. 
tJohn Reichert, Brisbane Hall. Milwaukee. 

•34 W. C. Halbleib, 815 Manstteld st., Chippewa Falls. 

•61 Joe. J. Wagner. 046 Hood st., h». Crosse. 

•85 Jos. Meyers, 234 Balcom st.. Eau Claire. 

100 C. A. Reynolds. Box 14J9. Edgerton. 
•135 C. Meydam. 659 Superior st., Appleton. 
•162 John Van Schyndle. 1720 Elm st.. Green Bay. 

168 Otto Schumann. 121 Monroe ave., Oshkosh. 

182 F. E. Lorch, 135 Murray at.. Madison. 

•Fred Sehnet te. 140 N. Hancock st., Madison. 
•212 H. McDonald. 1211 14th st., Supertor. 
Fred Toepfer. 1912 21st st., Superior. 

245 A. Patón. 413 Prentice ave.. Aabland. 
•287 Arthur Dittman. 2020 Louis st., Marinette. 

290 H. G. Chatfleld. 112 W. Milwaukee st.. Janesville. 

304 C. E. Jones. 1814 N. Chatham st.. Racine. 
•323 Fred Kneevers. 1025 Ontario ave.. Sbeboygan. 
•329 Frank Kons, 178 E. 13th st.. Fond du Lac. 
•341 Chas. Kreblein. 134 2d uve.. Neenah. 
•.%3 John F. Wurms. 216 Arcadian ove.. Waukesha. 
•372 F. J. Mettelka. 507 S. Cedar st.. Marshfleid. 
•.•Í81 Henry Moser. .307 .N. 8th st.. Watertown. 

447 Geo. A. Schmidt. 3.% Division «t.. Kenosha. 
•477 Hugh Goldle. 918 S. 13th st.. Manitowoc. 
•482 V. J. Splalne. 722 Washington st.. Wausau. 



C57 



-^ 



ÉEADQUARTERS 
IOS.OEARBORNST. 



KNOWLEDGE 

IS 

POWER 




VOL. XXXVII— ňo. 2. 

FEBRUARY, 1913. 



BETTER WORKING 
AND 

LIVING CONDITIONS 



EDITORIALS- 
TRADE NOTES. 

BRIEF ON IMPORT DUTY 
AND INTERNAL REV- 
ENUE,^ 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

OFFICIAL HATTER. 

REFERENDUM VOTE ON 
RESOLUTION. 



ORGANIZATION 



m 



s 



OFFICIAL»PAPER-OF-THE-C-M-l-U-OF-A- 
PUBLISHED- MONTHLY- AT •CHICAGO.-ILL. 



s 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



t Makers' Official Journal 

ISSUED MONTHLY 

G. W. PBRKINSk Editor and Pnbliaher 



hi, '.'■]< 1W*>li-: 



100 



Enifrtd as Stcond-Class Matter^ Nao. 28, J 894, ai thé Poa 

Office at Chicago^ III,, und^r Act of March 5, 1879. 

Sitbscriptùm Price 3Í .00 p9r year. SingU cofnes ten cents, 

Advtrtismg rates furnished an application. 

FEBRUARY 15, 1913. 



The work of organization should be and 
must be carried forward at all hazards. 

Considerable change has 

Organization taken place in the cigar 

Work. industry in the past ten 

or twelve years, which 
should not and must not be overlooked. 
The report of the president, submitted to 
the Baltimore convention and published in 
the September issue of the Official Journal, 
gave all of the substantial facts and figures 
concerning the trade, and those unorgan- 
ized were divided and subdivided. To those 
who are interested, even from a standpoint 
of self-preservation in the carrying for- 
ward of the work of organization, we sug- 
gest that they reread that part of the re- 
port and give it careful consideration. 

The Baltimore convention seriously con- 
sidered the whole question of organization. 
All except eight delegates were in favor of, 
or at least voted for one of the two plans 
presented for the organization of the so- 
called cheap districts. What was generally 
known as Class A, .or the half-dues and 
half-benefits plan, was finally adopted by 
the convention and submitted to popular 
vote for ratification. It is a significant fact 
that some of the delegates who professed to 
be in favor of a plan of organization and^ 
voted for one of the plans in the conven- 
tion returned home and immediately 
adopted methods which will be discussed 
later to defeat and destroy one of the most 
important measures adopted by the conven- 
tion. Members who professed to be in fa- 
vor of organizing the so-called cheap dis- 
tricts and then secretly planned to defeat 
well-proportioned measures adopted by the 
majority vote of the convention to accom- 
plish this end, are placed in an attitude 
which, to say the least, is incomprehensible 
to some. 

While we believe that the plan finally 
adopted by the Baltimore convention and 
which failed of ratification in the referen- 
dum vote, should have been ratified at least 



as an experiment if nothing els«, we, how- 
ever, are not discouraged in the slightest 
sense of the term. We have always been, 
and are now imbued with an abiding faith 
in the ability of the International Union to 
finally organize the trade, and the defeat of 
the Class A plan has made us more deter- 
mined than ever to push forward the work 
under existing laws. We ask all loyal 
union men and women, who are trade 
unionists at heart as well as by profession, 
to lend a helping hand in the campaign of 
organization, and to keep everlastingly at 
it until success has crowned our efforts. 
While we don't expect the impossible from 
the organizers, we do expect that they shall 
work faithfully and diligently in the eflFort 
to carry forward the work. While, under 
the law, the organizers are under the direc- 
tion and supervision of the international 
president, who is and will be responsible 
for them and their actions, we nevertheless 
ask the advice and co-operation of all loyal 
trade unionists in the efifort to get the best 
that lies within the organizers, who must 
and should perform all reasonable tasks 
assigned. A legitimate kick or honestly in- 
clined criticism will always be'welcome. 
We, however, have no use for the cowardly 
knocker, who by insinuation, innuendo and 
otherwise, seeks to discredit the work of 
the organizers. The organizers, however, 
are working for you, and we solicit for 
them your earnest co-operation and assist- 
ance. They need it. The work in hand 
needs it, and the combined best interests of 
all concerned demand it. 



The following laws embrace some of the 
labor legislation adopted in the state of 

New York in 1912: 
Labor Laws. Chapter 185, became a 

law April 5, 1912. The 
commissioner of labor may appoint from 
time to time not more than one hundred 
and twenty-five as factory inspectors, not 
more than twenty of whom shall be women, 
and who may be removed by him any time. 

Chapter 331; passed April 15, 1912. Em- 
ployment of females after childbirth pro- 
hibited. It shall be unlawful for the owner, 
proprietor, manager, foreman or any other 
person in authority of any factory, mercan- 
tile establishment, mill or workship to 
knowingly employ a female or permit a 
female to be employed therein within four 
weeks after she has given birth to a child. 

Chapter of the laws of 1912 provides that 
no child over fourteen years of age can go 
to work, unless he receives a certificate 
from the Board of Health. Such employ- 
ment certificate shall not be issued, until 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



such child further has personally appeared 
before and been examined by the officer 
issuing the certificate, and until such officer 
shall, after making such examination file 
and sign in his office a statement that the 
child can read and legibly write simple sen- 
tences in the English language, and that in 
his opinion the child is fourteen years of 
age or upwards, and has reached the nor- 
mal development of a child of its age, and 
is in sound health, and physically able to 
perform the work designated. This law 
applies only to cities of first class in the 
state of New York. 



The annual report of the wholesale asso- 
ciation of the co-operative movement of 

Germany contains some 
Co-onerative valuable and' interesting 

^. " r» ^ • information. Guided by 

Cigar Factories, ^v, «i. ^^ . v^« v*j^* j 

^ the experience and sub- 

stantial achievements of 
the "Rochdale Co-operative Societies" of 
Great Britain, the organized workingmen of 
Germany, disappointed by the meager re- 
sults of political action in Parliament, em- 
barked into co-operative distribution and 
production. The achievement's, within one 
single decade, have no parallel in the his- 
tory of co-operation by the working classes. 
Prejudices had to be overcome and ob- 
stacles had to be removed, which required 
hard work, and in some cases heroic treat- 
ment. Success appears to be assured; it has 
ceased to be an experiment, with the finan- 
cial assistance of trades unions, by the in- 
vestment of surplus funds in the shares is- 
sued by the Co-operativç Societies, the most 
important problem has been solved. With- 
out ample capital no enterprise of this mag- 
nitude has any chance of permanent suc- 
cess. Its future depends upon its ability to 
compete in the open market, by furnishing 
to the consumer a reliable article at a fair 
price; and in the ability to pay to the em- 
ployes the union rate of wages, combined 
with shorter hours of labor and fair condi- 
tions. The dividends paid to the consum- 
ers are one of the attractive features, which 
appeal to human selfishness. 

We are chiefly interested in that part of 
the business which relates to the production 
of cigars and tobacco, the distribution and 
selling price of the finished product to the 
retail stores controlled by the co-operative 
societies. The following is a brief review 
of the annual report: 

The three ci^r factories located in 
Frankenberg, Hamburg and Hockenheim, 
which the wholesale society purchased on 
January 1, 1910, from the "Co-operative To- 
bacco Workers' Society," were at the com- 



mencement subject to unfavorable condi- 
tions. The increase in the import duties of 
leaf tobacco, which became operative on 
August 15, 1909, had a depressing effect on 
the industry. The unsettled conditions due 
to the increased price -of the raw material 
were, however, gradually overcome. The 
sales increased from 27,807,000 to 30,113,000 
cigars, which is equal to an increase of over 
eight percent. The value of the products 
sold increased from 1,285,744 marks in 1909 
to 1,477,389 marks in 1910, giving an increase 
of over 14 per cent. The value of a mark is 
equal to 24 cents in American currency. The 
sales of tobacco products increased from 
536,385 marks in 1909 to 668,180 marks in 
1910, yielding an increase^ of over 24 per 
cent. The sales to 701 retail co-operative 
societies in 1909 amounted to 69.3 per cent 
and in 1910 to 75.2 per cent of the entire 
production of the wholesale co-operative 
society. The wholesale prices paid for the 
cigars were as follows: 

Cigars. Per 1,000. 

2,773.100 88 marks 

4,079,500 40 marks 

1,110,860 42 marks 

2,044,025 46 marks 

9,212,276 46-60 marks 

6,908,700 52-68 marks 

3,261,776 60- 66 marks 

705,726 70-100 marks 

18,860 120-200 marks 

11,079 (samples) 7,467 marks 

• ■ 

Total 30,112,879 marks 

In comparing the class of goods sold in 
1909, with the product of 1910, there has 
been a considerable decrease in the higher 
priced goods as compared with the former 
year. This is charged to the increase in the 
price of raw materials, and to the enhanced 
cost in production. The average consumer 
not being willing to pay the increase in 
prices, had recourse to buying the cheaper 
grades. These trade conditions affected 
wages to some extent. 

The original tobacco workers' co-opera- 
tive society was organized in Hamburg, 
where wages are higher than in the country 
districts. Being unable to compete with the 
lower priced goods, branch factories were 
located in Frankenberg and Hockenheim, 
in the Grand Duchy of Baden, where wages 
are much lower. 

The average number of cigar makers em- 
ployed in the three factories, both males 
and females, was 489. The factory in Ham- 
burg gave employment to 124; in Franken- 
berg 109, and in Hockenheim 256. / Since 
1908 the number of cigar makers employed 
in the Hamburg factory decreased 26 per 
cent, and in Frankenberg 17 per cent; but 
increased in Hockenheim 115 per cent. 
From January 1, 1910, to January 1, 1911, 
the number of employes increased 30 per 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



cent, averaging 565 workers. Besides these 
there were twenty salaried employes, con- 
sisting of traveling salesmen, clerks and 
foremen. The import duty on tobacco paid 
to the government in 1910 amounted to 
352,355 marks. 



The International Executive Board in- 
structed the President to prepare and sub- 
mit briefs to the Com- 
Tarîfî mittee on Ways and 

Legislation. Means, protesting against 
the reduction in the tariff 
rates on imported cigar's and protesting 
against any increase of the internal tax on 
cigars. In compliance with instructions the 
briefs were prepared and presented by the 
President to the Committee on Ways and 
Means. Both briefs, that is, the one against 
lowering import duty on cigars, and against 
increasing the internal revenue tax, are 
printed elsewhere in this issue of the Jour- 
nal. 

There seems to be a disposition on the 
part of some members of the Committee on 
Ways and Means to increase the internal 
revenue tax. We suggest that all unions 
and members try to arouse the trade to the 
danger especially of an increase in the in- 
ternal revenue tax, and to make your wishes 
in this connection known to your Congress- 
man and United States Senators. The 
names of the Democratic members of the 
Committee on Ways and Means, who will 
really decide this question are O. W. Un- 
derwood, Choice B. Randall, Texas; Francis 
B. Harrison, New York; William G. Brant- 
ley, Georgia; Dorsey W. Shackleford, Mis- 
souri; Claude Kitchin, North Carolina; 
Ollie M. James, Kentucky; Henry T. Rain- 
ey, Illinois; Lincoln Dixon, Indiana; Cor- 
dell Hull, Tennessee; Winfield S. Ham- 
mond, Minnesota; Andrew J. Peters, Massa- 
chusetts; A. Mitchell Palmer, Pennsylvania, 
and Timothy T. Ansberry, Ohio. 



The tobacco industry, as a whole, is un- 
dergoing a change; it is of vital dimensions. 

One branch of the indus- 

Trade try — the manufacture of 

Statistics, cigarettes — ^is forging 

ahead of the others in 
rapid strides. Its growth is impeding the 
normal increase in the cigar industry. From 
a small beginning it has outstripped its 
rivals, within one single generaron, in an 
ever-increasing volume. It has broken the 
backbone of the small cigar, weighing less 
than three pounds per thousand, within a 
few years. All hostile legislation has failed 
to hamper its growth. 
We do not welcome the cigarette as an 



honorable rival. We doubt very much its 
effect as a solace in comparison with the 
cigar; neither has it the soothing influence 
of a cigar made of tobacco of average fair 
quality. The whole merit of the cigarette 
consists in the cheapness of the article; sell- 
ing as low as ten for a nickel. Cheapness 
appears to be the drawing card which ap- 
peals to the nerve center of the average 
consumer — the pocketbook. 

The average smoker, whose judgment 
about quality is rather hazy, grabs the 
cheap article with avidity; puffing clouds of 
smoke, with the apparent relish due to the 
cultivated taste of the consumer of a good 
cigar. It is the boy barely out of school 
and the youth under 18, anxious to imitate 
the habits of the full-grown man, by indulg- 
ing in the smoking of cigarette's. A habit 
once acquired is hard to overcome. The 
cigarette smoker can be seen in the cafes, 
restaurants, hotel lobbies, in the parks, and 
in the public thoroughfares. The inhaling 
of the smoke of the paper wrapper of the 
cigarette cannot be very healthful; the smell 
is repulsive to the smoker of a good cigar. 

The production of cigarettes weighing 
less than three pounds per 1,000, paying a 
revenue tax of $1.25, amounted in 1912 to 
12,214,852,984. For the year 1911 taxes were 
paid for 9,908,036,779; showing an increase 
of 2,307,009,451 in one calendar year. 

The production of small cigars weighing 
less than three pounds per 1,000, paying a 
revenue tax of 75 cents, amounted in 1912 
to 1,061,270,735. For the year 1911 taxes 
were paid for 1,208,647,921; showing a de- 
crease of 147,377,186 small cigars, as com- 
pared with the former year. 

The production of cigars in 1912 weighing 
more than three pounds per 1,000 was 
7,378,972,420; in 1911 the output was 7,292,- 
136,526; showing an increase of 86,835,894 
cigars. 

The production of cigars in the month 
of December, 1912, was fair — from middling 
to . good. The principal increase was as 
usual in the cheap districts of Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, New York, Michigan, Ohio 
and Virginia. There was, however, a fair 
increase in some districts where a better 
grade of union made goods are manufac- 
tured. This is one of the encouraging feat- 
ures in a careful survey of the industrial 
situation. The statistical table compiled, 
from the revenue reports, though not com- 
plete, contains more information for com- 
parison : 

Dec, Dec, IncreaBe. 

District— 1912. 1911. Decrease.» 

Alabama 612.960 435,800 77.150 

Arkansas 149,627 168,620 18,993* 

California, 1st.... 4.238.410 4,491,920 253,510* 

California. 6th.... 1,522.160 1,551,220 29,070* 



CIOAB MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 6 

One of the poor specimens in the trades 
union movement is the pesaimist; he is a 
failure as an active worker, because he has 
no faith in himself nor in anybody else. 
Shrinking from hard and active work nec- 
essary to overcome the apathy and indiffer- 
ence of the non-unionist, he utters the most 
flimsy excuses, undermining: the hopes and 
aspiratiotis of the men anxious to succeed. 
He is »n obstacle in the path of progress. 

In attempting to improve the conditions 
of trade by demands for better wages, etc., 
one important factor should not be over- 
looked. Organization of more than a ma- 
jority working at the trade in one locality 
is essential and in many cases indispensable. 
Without this concessions made by manufac- 
turers in the stress of the moment cannot 
be maintained. Permanent organization 
and devotion to the cause of unionism are 
also of prime necessity. 

We quote the following from "Six Cen- 
turies of Work and Wages," by Thorald 
Rogers, Professor of Political Economy, at 
Oxford, England: "The evidence of the 
present and the example of the past appear 
to prove that labor partnerships are the 
remedy for low wages. They undoubtedly 
put the employer in a difHculty. They claim 
a greater share for labor in the gross profit 
of industry. They constrain him (if he is 
to hold his own in the struggle) to find his 
remedy in the economy of waste, in the de- 
velopment of invention, or in the reduction 
of rent." 

Low wages are a stumbling block in the 
path of progress and civilization; they sap 
the life blood of the young and old. Low 
EDITORIAL NOTES. wages breed tuberculosis and contagious 

The working people can help themselves diseases; they undermine the home and the 
by co-operation and intelligent action; they family life, destroy hope and create pessim- 
can help themselves by organization and the ism, and pave the way for premature old 
formulation of plans for their advancement age and death, 
in a financial, social and moral sense. They * • • 

can help themselves by enabling their chil- 
dren to have a fair education; by improving 
their homes and surroundings, and by utiliz- 
ing the leisure hours for study and healthy 
recreation. 









laoreaae. 


Dtotrfet- 




Decreaae.» 


Colormdo 






Ï,Î40» 








«16,7G5 




























301,877 


lUlnolB th 






181,403 


tlllnola (tb 






130,700 


Mteiw ath 






3)0,164 


Indiana Tth 






Ï, «7,447 


lOWk Sd 






1W.2BB 


Iowa 4th 






65S.«53 


KanaM 






Î2Î,127 


K«ntuokr td 






10,260 


Kentucky Stb.... 






6,473' 


Kantucky (th.... 






1H.4Î7* 


Kentucky 7tb.... 






10.800* 








."'ÎSÎ* 








706,630 








3,088,490 








1,612,844 


lUchlgan let.... 






4,153,410 


tfldUgan 4tli.... 






106,011 








^Z*'*!!. 


Ulnourt let 






»8.187* 


Uleeouri «tb 






342,690» 


Montan* 








Nebraeka. 


. a.4«B.a» 




ií¿,7» 




. 4,TS ,00* 




41(,23< 


New Jermer let. 


. «,01 ,SGT 




S«3,S«4 


New Jereay 5th. 


.M.T3 .60! 




»,1«0.B87 


.lew Mexico 


. 12 ,4D0 




«0,700* 


New Tork let... 


.11,51 1460 






New TTork id.... 


.14,80 ,SSO 






New Tork Sd — 


.46,78 .370 






New Tork 14th. . 


.11,54 .30S 






Now York îlet.. 


.1Î.4Î .090 






New Tork Seth.. 


. 6.» ,767 






M. Carolina 6th. 


.077 




8,077* 


N. and a DakoU BIS.SST 




«8,717 


}talo tet 


.i6.ti7.oeo 




104,707 


Jhlo 10th, 








ohKiith::;::::: 


■}íi¡¡: ?o 


i.ià .GM 


2,800,0 Ô 


3hto 18th 




13.31 ,«20 


3,749,7 




'S44! 40 


04 . eo 


104420* 




,.«,529. 10 


1.8J , 00 


>,8>1,2 






8,309.6 7 




S.7T . 10 


6,018,7 


Porto Rico 




3.04 , 40 






gll.lOO 


SI . GO 


" " 60 


rSSTYni. ■.!"." 


. l.!4Î.ÏÎ{l 


1,040. 80 


306,440 


TIi«iDla Id 


,1«, 714,670 


12.SR , 40 


4,173,130 


Virilnia «th 




78 , 50 


84.800 


ffaehlngton .... 
Wtmt Virginia... 


'. I,í6i,'ai7 


1,0S . 10 


1Í6.E07 


.iï.Mra.8oo 






Wleconeln let. . . 


. 7,SM,I»7 


• 7.S06.Ï80 


■ "i.Vss* 


Wlaconeln Id.... 


. S.405.E40 


S,30(,4I0 


99,130 



The man who expects and anticipates im- 
possibilities in the growth of the trades 
union movement is doomed to disappoint- 
ment. Expectations based on imagination, 
outside of the realm of facts and surround- 
ing conditions, cannot be realized. The his- 
toric progress of mankind has been slow; 
whenever it made rapid strides, reaction in- 
evitably followed. The gradual progress is 
the most enduring in the course of events. 



In the opinion of the "Survey," a journal 
of constructive philanthrophy, "the Penn- 
sylvania children who come to their major- 
ity in the 1920's ought to average an inch 
taller in height, and be broader of chest and 
lung; they will have more of the joy of life 
in them; they will have fewer crippled fath- 
ers among them, fewer brokendown women 
among their kin. The reason lies in the 
fact that J. C. Delaney, state factory in- 
spector, has been retired by Governor 
Tener — Delaney. the chief stumbling block 
to progressive labor legislation, and ade- 
quate child labor and safety enforcement in 
this, the greatest industrial state in the 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



The report of the Industrial Accidents 
Commission to the legislature at Harris- 
burg, Pa., contains many interesting points, 
from which we quote in part: 

"A fertile cause of accidents is overwork. 
No other important manufacturing state 
allows women to be employed in factories 
twelve hours a day and sixty hours a week, 
as the present factory law permits; and the 
commission recommends the reduction of 
the limitation of the hours of labor for 
women in industrial establishments to ton 
hours per day and to fifty-four hours per 
week." 

^ 4( « 

Fair criticism is both honorable and laud- 
able; to construct, to build up, to do better, 
is an honorable ambition. To have patience 
in the shortcomings of people less gifted in 
intellect and experience is a valuable asset. 
The aim to improve and to do right, regard- 
less of reward, is a priceless trait of char- 
acter. 

* * « 

The law limiting the hours of labor to 54 
per week for females employed in factories 
in the state of New York, was declared to 
be constitutional by Justice Blackmar of 
the Supreme Court in Brooklyn, N. Y. In 
the opinion of the court "women's liberty 
to contract to sell their labor may be only 
another n^rae for involuntary services cre- 
ated by existing industrial conditions. 

* *♦ ♦ 

Under the British Insurance Act, which 
became operative on January 1, 1913, every 
working woman at childbirth is entitled to 
a premium of $7.50.. It is not much, but 
every little helps to defray the necessary in- 
cidental expenses. The character of this 
legislation indicates the trend of events in 
the modern industrial era. 

* ♦ * 

Professor Irving Fisher of the Yale Uni- 
versity, commenting on^the high cost of liv- 
ing in the "North American Review," claims 
it is due primarily to gold inflation and the 
extension of banking. This is about as ab- 
surd a theory as the claims of a leading pol- 
itician sixteen years ago that "the price of 

wheat depended on the price of silver." 

* * * 

The Parliament of New South Wales 
passed a bill which provides for an eight- 
hour day in the coal mines. In connection 
with the miners* strike in Waihi, New Zeal- 
and, sixty-six unionists were sent to jail, 
because they remained on strike in violation 
of the law, and refused to give bonds for 
future good behavior. The strike, which 
was lost, was a protest against the compul- 
sory court of arbitration. The law which 



provides for the court has been in force for 
almost twenty years. 

« * * 

We .quote the.^ following from the latest 
compilation of the compensation laws, now 
in force for the loss of life in industrial ac- 
cidents. The following table gives the low- 
est and highest amounts allowed: 

California *. $1.000 $5,000 

Maryland 1,600 

Massachusetts 1,200 3,000 

Michigan 1,200 3,000 

Montana 3,000 

New Jersey 1,600 8,000 

Nevada 2,000 8,000 

New Hampshire 8,000 

Ohio 1.500 8,400 

Illinois 1,500 3,600 

Kansas 1,200 8.600 

Rhode Island 1,200 3,000 

Wisconsin 1,400 3,000 

The "Railway Clerk" writes: 

"Organized labor is a fixture. It is here 
to stay, just as is organization of capital. 
The sooner the employing class is given to 
understand that their employes are going 
to organize for their mutual benefit and pro- 
tection, and for the many other advantages 
that come to them through organization, 
the sooner the employing class is made to 
realize that the movement is perpetual, and 
that it carries with it a betterment of condi- 
tions, then, and not until then, will we be 
able to convince the employer that the em- 
ploye means business." 

* * * 

Now just a word concerning those men 
who come into the council with union cards 
in their pockets, yet ever ready to stir up 
strife and discord and arouse personal ani- 
mosities in order to promote disunion and 
dilapidation in the trade union movement. 

These men are not trade unionists at all, 
and some of them openly admit the truth 
of this charge. While sent to the council 
as delegates ostensibly to represent the 
trade unionists, they eagerly grasp every 
opportunity to criticize and condemn the 
American Federation of Labor, its officers 
and all those who believe in adhering to 
its policies They sneer at and hiss the 
trade unionist who believes in sane, sensi- 
ble, progressive development and attempt 
to foist upon the organization which have 
brought about the improvements and ben- 
efits which the wage workers of today en- 
joy, their visionary, impracticable schemes 
of emancipation of the workers. Their 
policies would utterly destroy the only in- 
stitution which has, during the past cen- 
tury, stood between the wage worker and 
abject slavery. Syndicalism has always re- 
sulted in disaster, but these poor creatures, 
who believe they have lound something 
new, are bent upon working out the salva- 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



tion of the world by destroying trade union- 
ism and establishing this weird, wild, wan- 
ton doctrine of despair and disaster, known 
as Industrial Workers of the World-ism. — 
San Francisco Clarion. 

* « * 

According to the Internationale Gewerk- 
schafts-Korrespondenz, published in Berlin, 
there are, or were, all told in 1911, in nine- 
teen of the most important countries, 11,- 
435,498 organized working men and women. 



TRADE NOTES. 

The production of cigars in the ñrst Ohio 
internail revenue district, weighing more 
than three pounds per 1,000, for the year 
ended December 31, 1912, amounted to 199,^ 
599,653. For the corresponding year in 1911 
taxes were paid for 204,121,069. This shows 
a decrease of 4,521,416 cigars, as compared 
with the former year. 

* * * 

The United Cigar Stores Company of 
America has declared a dividend of one and 
a quarter per cent and one-half per cent ex- 
tra on the common stock. The United Ci- 
gar Stores Company of America now owns 
all of the operating companies and every 
share of stock of all of the realty com- 
panies; in other words all the assets, good 
will, brands, leaseholds and leases of the 

old corporation. 

' ♦ ♦ ♦ 

According to the final report of the Agri- 
cultural Department at Washington, D. C, 
the total tobacco crop, suitable for making 
cigars, in 1912, as compared with 1911, was 

as follows: 

Pounds. Pounds. 

1912. 1911. 

New England 39.960,000 87,206,000 

New Tork 6,200.000 5,054,000 

Pennsylvania 64,090,000 65,320,000 

Ohio— Miami Valley 53,460.000 66,800,000 

Wisconsin 64.488,000 61,260,000 

Georgia and Florida 3,766,000 3,624,000 

Total 220.904,000 218.163.000 

« ^ « 

Twenty retail cigar stores are operated 
by the Syracuse firm of C. A. Whelan & 
Co., at various outside points, including 
three in Troy, two each in Oswego, Sche- 
nectady and Utica, and one each in Amster- 
dam, Binghamton, Auburn, Batavia, Cohoes, 
Elmira, Geneva, Glens Falls, Ithaca, Rome 
and Burlington, Vt. 

* « « 

A failure of the tobacco crop in Brazil 
has caused a serious decline in the exports 
of that commodity. The State of Bahia fur- 
nishes about 95 per cent of the total leaf 
tobacco exported. The other producing 
stptes are Minas Geraes. Santa Cathartna, 



and Sao Paulo, but production in the last- 
named is declining. It is calculated that the 
total production in Brazil is 37,000 metric 
tons (81,548;000 pounds). Germany, the 
principal buyer of Brazilian tobacco, took 
in 1911 only about one-half the amount it 
purchased in 1910, and Argentina also a 
proportionally smaller amount. 

* * * 

Where manufacturers have established 
popular brands of cigars, giving fair quality 
to the consumer, and the retailer sells ten 
cent cigars at cut rates — four for a quarter 
or seven cents apiece, the use of the blue 
label has increased in popularity. 

* * * 

The official report of the Cuban Custom 
House shows that the total exports of ci- 
gars, from January 1, 1912, to December 31, 
to all foreign countries amounted to 178,- 
981,472. For the previous year the total 
shipments amounted to 188,129,188; showing 
a decrease of 9,147,716 cigars as compared 
with the former year. 

* * * 

The British Trade Commissioner for 
South Africa reports that the third annual 
sale ^f tobacco grown from Turkish and 
Virginian seed in the Western Province was 
held in Capetown in June under the aus- 
pices of the Capetown Chamber of Com- 
merce. Over 200,000 pounds of leaf were 
offered for sale as compared with 20,000 
pounds last year and 7,000 pounds in 1910. 
The growers are much dissatisfied with the 
result of the sale as the prices realized did 
not nearly come up to those of 1910 and 

1911. 

* * « 

An estimate of the tobacco crop in the 
Japanese Empire, about six months ago was 
that 94,875,000 pounds of tobacco would be 
produced, but owing to the damage done 
by the typhoon since to the crop reports in- 
dicate that it will be reduced by 2,475,000 
pounds, making the total approximate about 

92,400,000 pounds. 

« * « 

The Bureau of Statistics of the United 
States Department of Agriculture, issued 
some time ago a circular in reference to the 
world's production of l^af tobacco, by the 
various countries. 

The table below gives in detail the data 
concerning the world's production of to- 
bacco of all large countries except China 
and Persia, for which countries official data 
of production are lacking. 

The average annual production of the 
world for the five years -1905-1909 was 2,- 
423,569,000 pounds. The United States pro- 
duces about one-third of the entire tobacco 



8 



CIQAB MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOUBNAL 



crop of the world, her average during the 
five years 1905-1909 being 766,883,000 
pounds, or 31.6 per cent. The second larg- 
est tobacco- raising country of the world is 
British India, with an average production 
of 450,000.000 pounds, or 18.6 per cent of the 
total production. Cuba is one of the small- 
est tobacco producing countries,- her pro- 
duction being only 2.1 per cent, or 51,797,- 
000 pounds. 

Country. Pounds. 

United States (includlns Porto Rico) 766.883.000 

United States 757.483,000 

British India 450.000,000 

Russia (including Asiatic) 197,446.000 

Austria-Hunerary 169.524.000 

Dutch East Indies 148.972.000 

Turkey (including Asiatic) 100.000,000 

Japanese Empire 94.409,000 

Germany 68,120.000 

Brazil 62,063.000 

Cuba 51,797,000 

Other countries 324.356.000 

Total 2.423.569,000 

* * « 

The importers of leaf tobacco, who in- 
clude some manufacturers, favor a reduc- 
tion of duty on leaf tobacco suitable for 
wrappers from $1.85 per pound to one dol- 
lar, and on fillers from 35 cents to 20 cents 
per pound. Under the reciprocity duty 
with Cuba there is in force a reduction of 
twenty per cent on the present rates. 

* * * 

The statistics published by the Tobacco 
Workers* Union of Belgium (Socialistic 
branch) covers 241 factories, which employ 
3,345 males and 1,736 females. The average 
working hours per week are sixty and one- 
half; the average weekly rate of wages is 
16 francs and 46 centimes ($3.29 in Ameri- 
can currency). 

* « « 

Senator J. B. DoUison of Hocking County 
in the state of Ohio, introduced a bill in the 
legislature which provides that any one 
who sells» furnishes or gives away cigarettes 
or cigarette wrappers, shall be fined not less 
than $200 or imprisoned for six months, or 
both. Any one under 21 years old, caught 
with a cigarette in his or her possession, 
shall be fined $50 or imprisoned for sixty 

days, or both. 

* * * 

Official figures for all Canada during the 
fiscal year of 19l5 show total imports of 
152,456 pounds of cigars, valued at $613,232. 
Cuba supplied eleven-twelfths of these ci- 
gars — the United States only one-twelfth. 
For the same period the production of ci- 
gars in Canada amounted to 248,906,934. The 
leaf tobacco imported amounted to 17,203,- 
513 pounds, valued at $4,434,757. Of this 
total 15,472,599 pounds, valued at $3,802,437 
were imported from the United States. The 



balance consisted of East Indian and Cuban 

tobaccos. 

* * * 

• 

In the first Illinois revenue district, lo- 
cated in Chicago, 111., the production of ci- 
gars, weighing more than three pounds per 
1,000, for which taxes were paid in 1912, 
amounted to 282,662,785. 

* * * 

The people in the Philippine Islands du 
not consume cigars to any extent. Not 
more than 109,924,014 cigars were consumed 
in 1912, or at the rate of 15 per capita. In 
the United States the consumption of cigars 
is at the rate of 75 annually for each inhab- 
itant. 

The total consumption of tobacco in the 
Philippines during the fiscal year 1912 
amounted to 12,512,204 kilos, or 27,526,848 
pounds, making ťhe average consumption of 
four pounds per annum for each inhabitant. 
Of the total amount of tobacco consumed 
one-half was used in the form of cigarettes. 

* * « 

The "free smokers" bill, which passed the 
House of Representatives, during the last 
session, was adopted by the United States 
Senate. The law allows twenty-one smok- 
ers to employes weekly, without the pay- 
ment of an internal revenue tax. 



Brief Submitted by President G. W. Per- 
kins to the Committee Jan. 17, 1913. 

To the Honorable Committee on Ways and 
Means. 

Gentlemen: As President of the Cigar 
Makers' International Union, with a mem- 
bership of over fifty thousand, I speak for 
and represent only the organized working 
men and women of our industry. It is my 
purpose to speak mainly of the economic 
issue involved. 

At every one of the conventions wc have 
ever held resolutions have been adopted 
favoring a protective tariflF for our industry, 
the reasons for which I will state as briefly 
and as concisely as I can. 

Prior to the adoption of the protective 
tariff in our trade very few cigars were pro- 
duced in this country. In 1863 we pro- 
duced all told 199,288,284 cigars, while ať 
thi»-time we produce nearly that number in 
one week's output, or between seven and 
eight billion cigars annually. The increase 
in the output of cigars since the adoption 
of the protective tariff is considerably over 
seven billion cigars per year. In 1860 the to- 
tal value of the product was about $1,000,000, 
while today it aggregates about $350,000,000. 
In 1863 I estimate that there were about 
two thousand cigar makers employed here, 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



9 



while today we have, according to govern^ 
ment statistics, about 136,000 people em- 
ployed in the manufacture of cigars, of 
whom about 110,000 are skilled workers and 
wage earners. The aggregate wage paid to 
cigar makers in 1869 was about $300,000, 
while today the wages received by the wage 
earners is about $50,000,000. The increase 
in capital invested is about $80,000,000, while 
the increase paid to wage earners is nearly 
$50,000,000 annually. The increase in the 
output of cigars since 1863 is about 3,700 
per cent, while the population has only in- 
creased in the same period about 100 per 
cent. 

There is no question in my mind at least, 
concerning the beneficent effect of the pro- 
tective tariff in our industry. JFormerly the 
import duty on cigars was $2.50 per pound. 
The McKinley Bill raised the import duty 
to $4.50 per pound with a 25 per cent ad 
valorem. 

What is known in the trade as the clear 
Havana manufacturing industry really start- 
ed in this country commencing with the 
adoption of the McKinley rates. Let us 
cite one instance as evidence of this fact. 

Prior to the adoption of the McKinley 
rates Tampa, Florida, was a way station 
with a population of possibly one thousand 
souls, and has now grown to a city of about 
60,000 people and gives employment to 
about 8,000 cigar makers, most of whom are 
engaged in making clear Havana cigars. 

During the operation of what is known as 
the Wilson Bill which reduced the import 
duty on imported cigars, our trade was ma- 
terially affected. The manufacture of ci- 
gars in this country fell off to an alarming 
extent, and at the same time "a noted in- 
crease in imported cigars took place. 

The cigar industry is peculiar in many 
respects and requires some technical know- 
ledge to properly understand the economic 
effect legislation of this nature has upon it. 

Let me call your attention to the fact that 
the federal government imposes a tariff of 
from 35 cents per pound on fillers to $1.85 
per pound on imported wrappers, less 20 
per cent under the reciprocity agreement 
with Cuba. 

To suit the tastes of the cigar consumers, 
manufacturers are compelled to import 
enormous quantities of foreign grown to- 
bacco. This is particularly so concerning 
Havana tobacco, the equal of which can- 
not or has not been grown on any other 
part of the globe. The government then 
compels us to pay a heavy import tax on 
the raw material, thus placing us at a dis- 
advantage with the clear Havana manufac- 
turers on the Island of Cuba, which, as 



you know, is only about eighty miles from 
the nearest landing point in the United 
States. Cigars in the past made in Cuba, 
owing to the disadvantage we labor under, 
have been imported in great numbers and 
will again if the import duty on cigars is 
reduced. While it is true that we import 
Havana tobacco here and make precisely 
the same grade and quality of cigars, still 
we are handicapped by the false notion that 
the cigar bearing an import stamp is "better 
than the same cigar produced in this coun- 
try. We also import large quantities of 
tobacco from the Netherlands. It is known 
as Sumatra tobacco. 

In addition to this we pay an internal 
tax of $3 per thousand, a manufacturer's 
license and higher wages, especially in the 
organized portion of the trade. 

Experience has demonstrated first that 
the industry grew to its present proportions 
under a protective tariff; secondly, that 
whenever the rates have been reduced a 
depression is immediately noticed in the 
trade; and, third, whenever the tax has been 
put to the proper figures, such as the pres- 
ent, the industry has immediately felt a 
stimulating effect and enjoyed comparative 
prosperity. Reduce the import duty on 
cigars and you will invite capital now in- 
vested in the cigar industry in this country 
to establish additional factories in Cuba 
and Porto Rico; both of whiph places, ow- 
ing to economic environment and the raw 
material grown there, which we are unable 
to grow elsewhere, are better adapted to 
the manufacture of cigars and more invit- 
ing to large combinations of capital, which, 
I venture to say without fear of successful 
contradiction, in the future, would avail 
itself of the opportunity. This would mean 
a terrific economic loss to the substantial 
well being of workingmen, manufacturers 
and society at large in this country. 

We hold that the first duty of the govern- 
ing forces of this country is to safeguard 
and protect, insofar as lies within their 
power to do so, the economic well being of 
its own citizens. We are more concerned 
in the markets in these United States than 
we are in the markets of the world. We 
assert as an economic truism that the more 
the wage earner receives in wages the more 
he is enabled to consume; and that after 
all the material welfare and advancement 
of trade and commerce is grounded upon 
the consuming capacity of the masses. Give 
the hired man, who is receiving $2 a day, 
$4 a day and he will place it all into legiti- 
mate channels of trade and commerce. We 
assert as a material fact that in countries 
where wages are highest and the hours of 



10 



CIGAR MAKERS^ OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



labor are shortest education, art, science, 
commercial and industrial advancement has 
made the greatest strides and civilization 
is the furthest advanced. For verification 
of this compare China and kindred coun< 
tries with our own, where the value of 
our imports has steadily increased so that 
today America stands at the head of the 
list in the aggregate value of its exports. 
We hold that lowering the import duty 
instead of benefiting the condition of the 
working men and women of our trade, or 
improving the v/ell being of society at large, 
would have a directly opposite effect. We 
hold and assert .that it would have a ten- 
dency to strengthen and render more stable 
great capitalistic combinations. We hold 
that a reduction on imported cigars for 
the reason stated in the foregoing would 
not cheapen the cost of the product to the 
consumer; and that if any benefit would 
accrue iipm such a course it would be to 
the advantage of aggregate and crystallized 
corporate interests, which, with its millions 
of resources, Would simply transfer its 
operations to countries where wages are 
low, workmen plentiful and better oppor- 
tunities to produce cigars. The product, 
however, under a lower tariff rate would 
immediately find its way into the markets 
of this country, with the added advantage 
of an import tax which appeals to a great 
many smokers. 

We again say that the industry has grown 
up to its present magnificent standing, 
which makes it about twelfth largest indus- 
try in the country, and one which con- 
tributes about $22,000,000 annually to the 
running expenses of the federal government 
under a protective tariff. 

The cigar industry for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1912, contributed $22,- 
589,467.51; for the tobacco trade, including 
cigars, cigarettes, snuff and manufactured 
tobacco of all descriptions, for the same 
period $70,500,000, which is about 20 per 
cent of the entire amount collected for the 
running expense of the federal government. 
The tobacco industry is the third largest 
contributor to the maintenance of the fed- 
eral government. 

Cigars are a very light commodity, and 
shipping, express or transportation rates 
are infinitely small, and cannot be compared 
to many other industries which, if working 
under a lower tariff rate, would still have 
to pay excessive freight or transportation 
rates. A thousand cigars can be sent across 
the United States for about 10 cents. It 
would be impossible to import a house 
and lot. The transportation rate to import 
a thousand cigars is negligible. 



We submit that the whole question goes 
beyond the question of a protective tariff. 
It becomes a question of a tariff for revenue 
only, and must be or should be skilfully 
handled; otherwise great damage, a's we 
have shown, will result to the economic 
well being of the men and women engaged 
in the industry, with the consequent benefit 
to only a favored few; and may result in 
serious interference with the income of the 
federal government. 

Congress has always looked upon the 
cigar and tobacco industry as legitimate 
prey for the purpose of raising the money 
with which to carry on our government, 
and has always raised the internal tax and 
raised or lowered the import duty to suit 
its fancy or the financial means of the gov- 
ernment. Despite this fact, it has grown 
to be the twelfth largest of the industries 
of this country, giving employment to about 
136,000 people with their dependents; and 
we hold is entitled to at least some thought- 
ful consideration in the settlement of this 
question. 

^ The cost of the production of» 1,000 
cigars should not be grounded upon the 
mere difference in wages of cigar makers, 
but rather upon the entire cost of the pro- 
duction. In Sumatra, where great quanti- 
ties of Sumatra tobacco are grown and 
imported into this country, the field work- 
ers, those who cultivate, care for, harvest 
and cure this tobacco, receive on an average 
about 25 cents a day. A competent man 
to do similar work in this country cannot 
be had for less than $40 a month and board, 
and some of them receive considerably 
more than that in wages. 

One of tht largest union manufacturers 
of clear Havana cigars in Chicago is about 
to move into a new building which will cost 
at least $8,000 a year for rent, to say nothing 
of the maintenance, heat, light, insurance, 
etc. Accommodations for making cigars 
can be produced in foreign countries, with 
which we would be brought into competi- 
tion, for a vastly less sum. The drayman, 
clerks, strippers, common laborers, and 
everything else in and about a cigar factory 
can be obtained for a great deal less wages 
than they can in this country. All this is 
true because of the vastly improved condi- 
tions under which men and women of this 
country are employed as compared with 
the conditions in foreign countries. 

Clear Havana cigars manufactured in 
Cuba can be obtained for $30 to $36 per 
1,000. These cigars are the kind that retail 
in this country at 2 for 25c. A first, jclass 
5c cigar made in this country for which 
union wages or fair wages are paid cannot 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



11 



be produced and sold wholesale for much 
less than the foregoing prices. The clear 
Havana cigars made in Cuba and referred 
to in the foregoing cannot -be produced in 
this country owing to difference in Jivages 
and other economic difference in cost and 
the import tax on leaf or raw material and 
sold at wholesale, with reasonable proñt, 
for anything less than $75, $80 or $90 per 
1,000. The imported article if the duties 
are materially reduced can be obtained and 
brought into competition with the Anleri 
can product for (including the import duty) 
about $55 or $60 per 1,000. *These figures 
only relate to the better class of good's or 
the clear Havana kind manufactured in 
Cuba. 

In Germany, Austria, Holland, Belgium, 
France, Italy and many other places only 
women and young girls are employed at 
cigar making and at frightfully low wages. 
Cigars in those countries can be produced 
for $10, $12 and upward per 1,000. The dif- 
ference in wages and other economic con- 
ditions and the access to the raw materials, 
duties, cost, etc., makes it impossible for 
union manufacturers and other manufac- 
turers paying a fair rate of wages to suc- 
cessfully compete under a low tariff. A 
union cigar maker receives from $18 to $50 
per 1,000 for making clear Havana cigars, 
which in some instances is about and in 
others more than the cost of pfoduction of 
a similar grade of cigars in Cuba, and a 
great deal more than the cost of production- 
in nearly all of the other foreign cigar pro- 
ducing countries. 

In our particular industry I am of the 
opinion that the tariff has very little if any- 
thing to do with the wholesale and retail 
selling prices of the commodity and that the 
lowering of the duty on imported cigars 
would have absolutely no deterrent effect 
upon the real or fancied monopolies, trusts 
or combinations of capital in our trade. 
This thought I hold is true because there 
are trusts and great combinations of capital 
now operating in this country that are in 
no wise affected by tariff regulations or im- 
port duties, and which control the selling 
prices of their products and activities. For 
instance, no one can successfully deny that 
the hanking business in this country is con- 
trolled by gigantic trusts or by gentlemen's 
agreements and that banks, money, etc., 
are not subject to tariff regulations. The- 
atres and their operations are largely crys- 
tallized and controlled by trust agreements, 
and yet the tariff has nothing whatsoever 
to do with them. Baseball and many other 
similar industries and enterprises are 
crystallized into what is known as modern 



trusts, on which tariff regulations and imports 
duties have absolutely no bearing. The 
foregoing regulate and control the selling 
prices of their products and activities. 

In my judgment an effort to give us all 
unrestricted free access to and an oppor- 
tunity to obtain raw material in our own 
country would be vastly more beneficial to 
independent manufacturers and the working 
men and women employed by them and to 
the consuming public than an attempt or an 
effort at this time to reduce the import duty 
on manufactured cigars. 

We do not want to appear selfish in this 
matter, and have endeavored to point out 
the economic reasons upon which our con- 
tentions for the present import tariff rates 
are grounded. 



Copy of Brief Submitted January 30, 1913, 
by President Perkins. 

Chicago, January 31, 1913. 
To the Committee on Ways and Means. 

Gentlemen: The Cigar Makers' Interna- 
tional Union, representing 50,000 organized 
working men and women, earnestly and re- 
spectfully protest against any increase in 
the internal tax on cigars. 

"The cigar industry for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 19.12, contributed $22,589,- 
467.51; for the tobacco trade including ci- 
gars, cigarettes, snuff, and manufactured to- 
bacco of all descriptions for the same pe- 
riod, $70,500,000 which is about 20 per cent 
of the entire amount collected for the run- 
ning expense of the Federal Government. 
The tobacco industry is the third largest 
contributor to the maintenance of the Fed- 
eral Government." I submit that in all fair- 
ness we are now furnishing a tax away be- 
yond our fair proportion. 

Cigars sell for five, ten, and fifteen cents 
each hence there is no ready means of dis- 
^ tributing the burden of internal taxation 
among the consumers. We now pay an in- 
ternal tax of $3.00 per thousand on ordinary 
cigars or cigars weighing more than three 
pounds per thousand and the great bulk of 
them weigh more than that. If Congress 
raises the internal revenue tax on cigars 
the result of this will be a reduction of 
wages in the already scant pay of cigar- 
makers. This is absolutely true insofar as 
the unorganized portion js concerned. The 
consumer will still continue to pay five, ten, 
or fifteen cents. The jobbers and local deal- 
ers would refuse to pay more, and the man- 
ufacturers would go to the only source left 
open in which to get this increased tax, that 
is, out of the scant wages of the working 
men and women. This is not an idle state- 



12 



CIGAR MAKEBS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



ment. It has always been the rule in the 
past whenever the taxes were raised. 

We deny that cigars and tobacco are any 
more a luxury than thousands of other com- 
modities. If the use of cigars and tobacco 
is a luxury then the man who wears a thir- 
ty, forty or fifty dollar suit of clothes is in- 
dulging in luxury. About $2.00 would buy 
sufficient cloth which with a nickel's worth 
of needles and thread could be converted 
into a garment that would keep out the hos- 
tile elements and produce sufficient warmth. 
Yet no one will say that the diflference be- 
tween a two-dollar horse blanket and a 
forty or fifty-dollar suit of clothes is in- 
dulging in luxuries. 

It is simply a concession to our comfort 
and enjoyment. Man could live on a mess 
of oatmeal, a few beans, and sausage. Should 
it be said that those who buy and eat 
broiled steak, and roast beef are indulging 
in luxuries! The same principle applies 
all the way through, and if we go back to 
' actual necessities we would soon be back 
to barbaric conditions. Precisely the same 
principle applies in the use of cigars and to- 
bacco, the use of which has become a ne- 
cessity and can no longer be classed as a 
luxury. The man who uses tobacco does 
so as a concession to his comfort and en- 
joyment and because habit has made it a 
necessity just as much so as in the case of 
the man who wears the fifty-dollar suit of 
clothes in preference to the garb worn by 
our earliest known settlers, who by the way, 
smoked the pipe of peace. 

I have been a cigarmaker for thirty-five 
years, twenty-one years of which has been 
in the capacity of President of the Cigar 
Makers* International Union. I have stud- 
ied and think I know something about the 
cigar industry and I want to say to you in 
all earnestness and sincerity that an increase 
in the internal revenue tax would do more 
toward disturbing the present relations be- 
tween the employed and the employer than 
any other thing Congress could do. It 
would, I say without fear of successful con- 
tradiction, result in a reduction of wages, 
surely among the unorganized and would 
have a serious disturbing effect on the or- 
ganized portion of the industry which is 
always in fierce competition. 

Fully 136,000 are employed in the cigar 
industry alone to say nothing of the to- 
bacco industry, all of whom are human 
beings who produce, receive wages, and do 
just as much toward keeping the wheels of 
industry turning and trade and commerce 
alive as do any other class of human beings. 
They feel the touch of adversity and the 
crushing çffçcts of hostile legislation just ^^ 



keenly and just as quickly as any other 
working men and women. 

We earnestly and emphatically protest 
against any increase in the internal revenue 
tax on cigars. 



What Fools We Mortals Be. 

A mathematical, problem for all union 
label men to digest. I have often wondered 
if men who smoke tobaccos, and buy them 
frogi cigar stores, which give coupons, ever 
stop to realize what the prizes, which go 
with the coupons really cost them. 

The scheme as it is played today, is a 
wonderful profit to the tobacco company. 

Before the American Tobacco Co. be- 
came a fact, the Internal Revenue Depart- 
ment at Washington, D. C, issued a two- , 
ounce stamp, which was placed J2ii a pack 
age of tobacco which sold for 5c. 

The tobacco was sold to the dealer for 
32c per pound, and he soldait for ^c there 
being 8 packages to the pound. 

After the American Tobacco Co. began ta 
get control of the different tobacco com- 
panies, they started the coupon business, 
but it did not fully develop until the Unit- 
ed Cigar Stores, were well under way, and 
today it is an octopus carried on in restraint 
of competition. 

To show how it is worked today I will 
give two examples, one for the wholesale 
end and one for the retail, or consumers' 
end. As an example we will take the B. L. 
smoking tobaccos. 

Today a supposed S-pound box of tobacco 
costs $2.00, in the box there are 48 pack- 
ages, of 1^ ounces in each package, so the 
dealer pays $2.00 for 4^2 pounds of tobacco, 
and sells it for $2.40, the profit is the same 
as it formerly was but he has to invest 40c 
more, and has to sell 8 packages more in 
order to get the same profit. 

Now we will take up the consumers* end. 

The United Cigar Stores will give a con- 
sumer a pair of Boston garters for 12 full 
value coupons; in order for the consumer 
to obtain 12 full value coupons he has to 
purchase 60 packages of tobacco As there 
are- only 1^ ounces in each package, he is 
short yi ounce of what was formerly in the 
package. Sixty packages ^ ounce short in 
each package is 30 ounces, or 20 packages 
short, which is $1.00. So he pays $1.00 for 
a pair of Boston garters which sell for 25c 
at retail. The consumer sees only the 
beautiful coupon and the prize that goes 
with it, but fails to figure out the cost to 
him, Respectfully yours, 

A CIGARMAKER. 



CIGAB MAKBBS' OFFICIAL JOUBNAL 



13 



CORRESPONDENCE 



Logansport, Ind., Dec. 31, 1912. 

With the close of the old year, I feel in 
the mood to pound out a few thoughts to 
you on matters that I at least deem im- 
portant to us all. 

The subject that I set out to write about 
is the article from your pen in the Decem- 
ber Journal under the caption of "Faith vs. 
Destructionists," and while I think of it I 
want to compliment you on the article. I 
confess that I am in a measure dissatisfied 
with the present conditions in our organiza- 
tion. Destructionists, yes, and in every lo- 
cality even in the small unions, the virus of 
a certain class of "imps of hell" are at 
work. But this is not the worst feature of 
which complaint can be made. The apathy 
and indifference of the cigar makers is ap- 
palling. I cannot properly diagnose the 
case. I don't know how to begin to de- 
scribe it, and the worst of it all is I per- 
sonally have never had the satisfaction but 
on one or two .occasions to meet this enemy 
to our progress face to face. The con- 
temptible methods of the species of traitors 
and intriguers that you refer to in the Jour- 
nal do their dirty work by means that are 
so despicable that it is astonishing even to 
myself that never lay claim to an over sup- 
ply of moral sense or honesty, and to the 
truly honest unionist is incomprehensible. 
I have heard of the most pusillanimous (ex- 
cuse these jaw-breakers) slanders against 
the officers of the C. M. I. U. of A., during 
the months succeeding our convention that 
I ever heard in my whole existence. Some 
of the insinuations and untruths were so 

ridiculous. that one would think they would 
fall of their own weight. But when we dis- 
cover that these vile and loathsome state- 
ment's are given credence by many of our 
members, the thing becomes unbearable 
and nauseating in the extreme. Sometimes 
I think that perhaps a house-cleaning might 
bring some relief but of course that is out 
of the question, we will simply have to 
brave the storm, and we who are really con- 
cerned in the welfare of our noble organiza- 
tion must make the fight until the last 
viper has bitten himself in his death throe. 
A contingency may arise in the trade that 



will aid us in the good fight, and time may 
bring about the very reverse of what we 
fear. One thing is certain we "Blues" must 
stand together and all feelings save that of 
unity and the welfare of the C. M. I. U. 
must be cast out of our thoughts and 
actions. The wheat must be separated from 
the "chaff" and the destroyers must be fer- 
reted out and crushed. Let no guilty dog 
of a traitor escape. As I stood beside the 
casket of my dear, deceased mother my mind 
became reminiscent and wandered back to 
the days when my own condition and that 
of our grand organization were, one might 
say, synonymous, and I thought of the bitter 
struggle that I made for bread, and my 
humble efforts to assist that dear old moth- 
er in her bitter struggle for her children 
along with my other struggles and priva- 
tions that I endured, or rather shared with 
the then struggling organization. Of the 
devotion, heroism, sacrifice of the grand 
men with whom I was associated, and of 
how these early pioneers as Sam Gompcrs 
said in the Baltimore convention, laid the 
ground work and blazed the trail of indus- 
trial freedom and progress for the men and 
women of the cigar trade, a bitter pang 
pierced my heart, and as though a dagger 
had done its deadly work, sad and silent 
remorse permeated my soul, when I re- 
flected on the dastardly work of those who 
are trying to disrupt our organization, or 
injure its influence for good. I may be a 
crank on this subject; but in that at least, 
I am an honest crank. I am very serious 
when it comes to this whole question, and 
r want to assure you that though I am not 
so situated that I can be of the service that 
I would like, and have not the ability to do 
a great deal still he who does his best does 
well, as the old saw goes, I will at all times 
and on all occasions do what lies in my 
power to enlarge the scope and increase 
the sphere and infhience of the Cigar Mak- 
ers' International Union of America and 
will allow no one to excel me in loyalty to 
its chosen officers and representatives. We 
have some bad spots, with character assas- 
sins galore, and the whole dirty, cowardly 
crew never lost a minute's time nor made a 
single sacrifice for the uplift of the organ- 
ization, yet now they would dictate its 
policy. O. P. SMITH. 



Sacramento, Cal., Feb. 4, 1913. 
Would like to receive from you the prop- 
er construction and full meaning of the 
law just passed pertaining to weekly pay- 



14 



CIGAR MAKERS^ OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



ments of percentage on international loans 
and the failure of missing a payment on 
same suspended from all benefits excepting 
death. I would like to know for how long 
a member is suspended and also if it takes 
in such members who are employed and 
wJho take a week "off"; also members who 
don't feel disnosed to work or si^e called 
away on business. Expecting an imme- 
diate reply, Yours fraternally, 

ABE SILVERSTONE. 



Feb. 12, 1913. 
Mr. Abe Silverstone, Sec'y Union 238. 
Sacramento, Calif. 
Dear Sir: Replying to yours in which 
you ask construction of Section 106 in ref- 
erence to the repayment of loans, I have 
to say that a member who is working and 
fail's to pay his per cent on loans under 
the amended law is placed on the non-ben- 
eñciary list and deprived of all beneñt ex- 
cept death benefit, where he remains until 
all loans on his card are repaid. A mem- 
ber who is not working or who lays off for 
any cause for a week does not have to pay 
percentage on his loans. Where a mem- 
ber is called away on business he does not 
have to pay per cent on loans while not 
working. Yours fraternally, 

G. W. PERKINS, 
Int. Pres. 



Co-operation and Its Relation to Strikes. 

Boston, Jan. 27th, 1913. 

The article of co-operation in last 
month's Journal was interesting and show- 
ed how a few men limited in means bat 
with an unlimited amount of energy, cour- 
age and determination can achieve in- 
dustrial and commercial success, in the face 
of apparently adverse conditions. It is a 
source of wonderment and surprise that the 
principle of co-operation is not more com- 
monly discussed by the workers. It ap- 
pears that if the time, money and energy 
of our leaders and thinkers in the labor 
movement would apply and direct their at- 
tention to the practical solution of the labor 
problem through and by co-operation, 
much more progress would be made. 

Co-operation is a system of united ef- 
forts for commercial and industrial pur- 
poses. Why cannot a body of worker« 
who can unite and work as a labor organi- 
zation and collect and disperse large 
amounts of money for insurance, for sick 
and death and out-of-work, strike benefits, 
and for advertising labels, keeping on the 
pay-roll organizers and a small army of 
salaried officers put some part of the money 



into a practical enterprise that would in 
time give its members industrial freedom? 
If this question were laid before our mem- 
bers in a lucid and comprehensive manner, 
I believe much good will be accomplished 
in that direction. What we need is more 
constructive and progressive laws« 

In cases where strikes are unavoidable, it 
appears that the principle of co-operation 
ought to be applied, in order to win the 
strike. For instance, in the districts where 
the union label and union conditions are 
practically unknown, as in the cigar centers 
that produce goods for the trusts, the 
money that is collected to pay strike bene- 
fits to keep the members on the street, 
could be used in establishing a factory with 
union conditions and pay and keep our 
niembers employed. Where the number in- 
volved is larger than the funds would al- 
low, the work could be divided as nearly 
equal as possible until such time as the 
goods could be disposed of. With a large 
membership over the Unjted States it ap- 
pears there ought to be no difficulty in 
placing these goods where the union label 
is now unknown. The entire membership 
would be interested in bringing to the no- 
tice of the public and organized labor the 
products of the union. The scheme has 
vast possibilities and ought to be discussed 
and considered in the interest of economy 
and efficiency. There would be no need 
of competing with the union manufacturers, 
the competition would be directed against 
the Trust and the non-union factories. The 
goods could be produced better both in 
quality and workmanship than the Trust 
goods that are on the market now. 

Now a word in reference to the personnel 
of those who would be apt to take charge 
of such an undertaking. That in a measure 
must be left to the executive officers of the 
organization. There are many men now 
working at the bench who possess the 
necessary qualifications for operating the 
factory successfully. I beg leave to call 
the attention of the members to the fact 
that Union 97 of Boston owes its present 
union conditions and scale of prices to 
the fact that co-operative factory was the 
starting point from which those conditions 
evolved. From 1880 to 1890 there has been 
more or less strikes or rumors of strikes 
which brought about a feeling of uneasi- 
ness to the members of Union 97. The 
writer personally was involved in some of 
those strikes and knows that it is an abso- 
lute fact that the co-operative cigar factory 
started in this city during the strike of 
, 1884 had been the means directly of union- 



CIGAR MAKEItS* OFFICIAL JÓÜBNAL 



16 



izing the city of Boston and forcing the 
union label to be recognized. "^ 

In May, 1884, seven of our members 
recognizing that the strike was inevitable, 
started a co-operative factory and procured 
a charter from the state to do business. Not 
one of those men had any business train- 
ing or financial backing that would guar- 
antee surety of success. The amount of 
money that could be raised between them 
was $1,050. They quit their jobs and start- 
ed as though they meant business. It was 
a success from the start. Of course the 
fellow members of the union did much to 
boom the label and give the moral support. 
Today the same concern is still doing busi- 
ness and employs about sixty hands main- 
ly on ten-cent goods. Two years later 
twenty-five men, also members of our union, 
started another factory.« They also proved 
successful. The other manufacturers took 
the hint and were anxious to establish 
union conditions and pay in the factories, 
until today there is not another city in the 
country where the employer and the em- 
ployed are on better and more friendly re- 
lations. 

If this question could not be managed by 
the International Union, why not encourage 
the members to start these co-operatives 
all through the country where no union 
labor predominates, and the International 
Union should encourage and lend their 
moral if not their financiaf^stipport. I be- 
lieve that could be also agitated by our 
organizers in traveling the country. 

I would be pleased to get the opinion 
of our International President in an edi- 
torial on the subject. 

Yours fraternally, 

H. H. Goldberg. 

Oneida, N. Y., Jan. 20th, 1913. 
In the constitution adopted from the last 
convention in regards to brother members 
not paying percentage, I construe it to 
mean a member failing to pay percentage 
is suspended from all benefits, except death 
benefit, until all his international locals are 
cleared from his card. If so, and he 
draws his card, how is a secretary to ar- 
range it with his card? 

Yours fraternally, 

£. C. Hunter. 



to the constitution reference to failure to 
repay per cent on loans, I have to say your 
construction of the law is absolutely cor- 
rect. That part of Section 106 as amended 
reads as follows: *'Any member receiving 
loans on card shall after obtaining employ- 
ment pay to the collector of the shop in 
which he is employed ten per cent of his 
earnings weekly." » » ♦ "Any mem- 
ber who fails to pay his percentage as 
above provided shall stand suspended from 
all benefits except death benefits. If the 
member within three weeks from such sus- 
pension pays ten per cent of his earnings 
and continues to do so until his loan is paid 
he shall be restored to his previous rights, 
etc." 

The foregoing quoted section of the 
amended law is plain and explicit and 
means that any member neglecting or re- 
fusing to pay ten per cent on International 
Loans is constitutionally suspended fťom 
receiving benefits of any kind except in the 
event of his death, until his entire loan is 
repaid. You will notice that the law spe- 
cifically states "until his loan is paid" which 
of course means all that ,is on his card« 

In the event of a member, who through 
neglect or refusal to pay percentage on 
loans is debarred from benefits, desiring to 
travel, he may be given his regular travel- 
ing card with the statement plainly writ- 
ten on the title page of the loan boak as 
follows: "The bearer is not entitled to 
benefits of any kind except death benefit 
until the full amount of loans on this card 
is repaid."- 

Yours fraternally, 

G. W. Perkins, 

Int. Pres. 



Jan. 23, 1913. 
Mr. E. C. Hunter, 
Sec'y Union 12, 
Oneida, N. Y. 
Dear Sir: Replying to yours of the 20th 
concerning the operation of the amendment 



Jan. 28th, 1913. 

G. W. Perkins, 

Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: I would like to know how far 
a secretary could go under the new Con- 
stitution in forcing a member to pay loans 
for we have two or three members who give 
the shop collectors the laugh and they think 
iťs a joke when you tell them that they 
are suspended from benefits but the death 
benefit. Can a shop collector stop them 
from working till they do pay their per 
cent on loans? Please let me know at once 
for they owe large loans and I want to get 
it and do it quick. Oblige 

Ygurs fraternally, 
Willard Hall, 
Fin. Sec. Union 33, Indianapolis. 



16 



CIGAK MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



Feb. Ist, 1913. 
Mr. Willard Hall, 

Sec'y. Union 33, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Dear Sir: Replying to. your reference 
collection of loans let me say you will find 
by reference to Section 106 that if a mem- 
ber neglects or refuses to pay percentage 
on loans he is placed on the non-beneficiary 
list and that if within three weeks he starts 
paying per cent on loans and continues to 
do so until his loan is repaid he becomes 
beneficial. 

You will find, by reference to 'the same 
section, latter part, that it says "Any mem- 
ber obtaining, or owing loans, from any 
union who shall refuse or neglect after ob- 
taining employment to pay to the shop col- 
lector his percentages shall be suspended 
until he complies with the law when he may 
be admitted as provided by Section 69 of 
the Constitution." This latter part of the 
section applies to the members who are not 
only placed on the non-beneficial list but 
who then refuse to pay percentage on loans. 

The law concerning the repayment of 
loans is drastic and when fuliy explained to 
the member it looks like anything but a 
joke. Yours fraternally, 

G. W. Perkins. 

Int. Prest. 



reinstated over a year and has only repaid 
$2.0() on the $20.00 loan he owed. 

Yours fraternally, 

G. W. Perkins, 
Int. Pres. 



Wausau, Wis., Jan. 22nd, 1913. 
Mr. Geo. W. Perkins, 
Chicago, 111. 
Dear Sir: Mr. H. E. Turner was rein- 
stated in December, 1911, owing Interna- 
tional loans at the time $20.00. He has 
since paid $2.00 on loan. Wishing to travel 
he asks for a traveling card. 

There is a provision added to Section 104 
under the new law which says a reinstated 
member shall not receive a loan card until 
all old loans on card have been paid. Ques- 
tion: Does this law affect this member un- 
der the circumstances? 

Yours^fraternally, 

V. J. Splaine, 
722 Wash street, Wausau, Wis. 



Jan. 24th, 1913. 
Mr. V. J. Splaine, 

Sec'y. Union 482, 
Wausau, Wis. 

Dear Sir: In the case of Mr. Turner, if 
he was reinstated December, 1911, he does 
not come under the amended law. The 
amended law concerning loans afreets only 
those who are reinstated after January 1st, 
1913, and for that reason does not apply 
to Mr. H. E. Turner who you state has been 



y 



Kalamazoo, Mich., Jan. 30th, 19Í3. 
Mr. G. W. Perkins. 

Dear Sir and Bro.: Will you please give 
me a few particulars regarding the part of 
members not paying percentage on loans. 
How long are they not entitled to benefits? 
Also if a member pays his percentage one 
week and does not pay it the next week', 
how long IS he not entitled to benefits? 
And also if member misses one week's per- 
centage and makes it up the next week, how 
about his benefits? 

Thanking you in advance for your ad- 
vice. Yours fraternally, 

H. J. Stohrer, 
1206 S. Burdick street. 



• Jan. 31st, 1913. 
Mr. H. J. Stohrer, 

Sec'y. Union 205, ' 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Dear Sir: Replying to yours let me say 
you will find by refertnce to Section 106 
(new law) that it provides in part "Any 
member who fails to pay his percentage as 
above provided shall stand suspended from 
all benefits except death benefit. If the 
member within three weeks from such sus- 
pension pays ten per cent of his earnings 
and continues to do so until his loan is 
paid he shall be restored to his previous 
rights." The foregoing means that the 
member must pay full percentage on his 
loan each week; that if he fails to do so he 
becomes suspended from benefits, and that 
if within three weeks he starts paying reg- 
ular weekly percentage on his loans and 
continues to do so until the entire loan on 
his card is repaid he is then restored to full 
benefits. 

The latter part of Section 106 reads as 
follows: "Any member obtaining, or ow- 
ing loans, from any union who shall refuse 
or neglect after obtaining employment to 
f)ay to the shop collector his percentage 
shall be suspended until he complies with 
the law when he may be admitted as pro- 
vided by Section 69 of the Constitution,*' 
If the member fails to pay for one week 
and commences to do so within three weeks 
he does not have to pay full percentage on 
the week that he neglected to pay. He has 
already paid the penalty of being placed on 
the non-beneficial list. If, however, after 
three weeks he still refuses or neglects 



CIGAB MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



17 



to pay percentage on loans then he becomes 
suspended from the union and can .only 
be re-admitted as a new member in com- 
pliance with Section 69 of the Constitu- 
tion. To make this clearer to you — a mem- 
ber cannot skip one week and then by pay- 



ing percentage on two weeks in the next 
week escape the penalty of the non-bene- 
ñcial clause. 

Yours fraternally, 

G. W. Perkins, 
Int. Pres. 



(Crtettetiêttiegitng ttt ^euit^tatii». 

i)ct SBcrbonb htt ^àdet unb Sidri^ 
b i t tír c n bëranftûïtétc in bcr Qcit bdm 3. Btô 
17. íflótjembet im qansen ÏRexé^t Ecrfommluň* 
gen 3toc(ï§ ©tcHunanûimc au bcr ^orberung 
eineê gcfc^ïtd^en tood^entlid^en aiul^etagcS refjj, 
ber 36ftünbigen (SonntagSrube ber m SBSde* 
rcicn unb Äonbitoreien SBcfd^äfttaten. S)er ^ou 
ftanb mirb beim Çufammentritt be» Steid^ôtageâ 
erneut cinc Çctitton in btefcr gragc untcrbrci* 
ten. 

^tz (rentrai * ©erein ber ©tib* 
Bauer aâÇIte am ©d^Iuffe be« 2. OuartalS 
3787 SWüglieber gwen 3684 can 81. SWAr*. á^te 
(řhmaímen awe aRitgnebcrbrfttagen Bettugen 
38,229 aßarf, bte ©cfatnmtauSgaBen ber 0(möt* 
Ittffe 35,385 2Äar!. «on ben Unteren Cntfielett 
auf «tteüunterpöfeuttg ö49ö Sßot!, «tbeüetd* 
fenuntcrftütung 6563 SKarï unb auf Äranien* 
untcrftüéung 2647 SWor!. S)cr Äaffenbeftattb 
tft auf 103,685 »lar! íerangetoadĎfcn. 

$)te aWiteíicberaaW be« ©lafer * ©er* 
b a n b e « tjt im atpctten Cuartal bon 4691 auf 
4747 acftiegcn. Cur 8lctfe* unb «rbeitSTofen* 
unterftii^ung tpurben runb 10,000 SKor!, für 
@trei!8 unb fio^nbetoegungen 6170 SWarl ber* 
ausgabt. S)er ^affenbeftonb belief ft* ouf 
97,047 aWarl. 

S^r (S:entraI*J8erbanbbeôi&anb* 
lunpôgéBilfcn * ©er ban be» l^at fo* 
eben tn ©udSform cine 3)arftcnung ber bon iÇm 
abgefd^IofFcnen S^ortfbertrage Çcrauôgcgcben. 
^mnad^ beftc^en gugeit 107 fold^er bom ©er* 
bonb abgefd^Ioffencn ©ertrage, bie ftd^ auf girïa 
600 Orte, 1911 ©etrtebêfteïïen mit 7536 bon 
ben ©ertragen erfaßten ©efiäftigten er^edten. 
©on ben ©ertrdoen galten 25 für 5lontort)er* 
fonal, 4 für Äontor* unb ©erfaufêjjcrfonal unb 
78 ©ertrage für ©erraufSperfonal. 

S)er irranSportarbetter * ©er* 
banb éjâl^rte am 1. Ortober 221,400 SWitglte* 
ber. S>ie SimaÇmc im 3. Ouartal betrug runb 
9000 aWitglteber. 

( (S^orrefbonbenabiatt. ) 

3m brittcn Ouartal aa^lte ber $utma* 
<5£r*©crbanb 10,415 aaÇÎenbe 3Witglieber. 
rïur Unterftü^ungen tourbe u. a. herausgabt: 
«rbeilgrofenunterftüfeung 8870 SWar!, Äranfen* 
unterftüfeung 7809 SRaü, Oemaferegciten* unb 
©tretruntcrftüfeung 365 2War! unb iWcifeuntcr* 
ftübung 518 SWar!. ^er ©eftanb bcr ^aupt* 
fafîe hetmçi am 30. (Septtmbez 251,397 Ulíarř. 

S)er ©erbanb bcr 3Kaf d^intften 
berouSgabte hn brittcn Ouartal für îfrbcttS* 
Tofenunterftü^ung 9913 SWar!, ÄranTcnuntcr* 
ftfiiwng 84,152 SWar!, Çtreiïunterftftfeung 



2i,4öl matl ftuSflcfpcrttctt* ünh êma^tt^tU 
ten*Utitetftüi^üng 5230 Wlatt Unb für £d^nb¿* 
toégungèn ,4601 SWör!, 

$>er @attict * ©erbďttb ^afftte útíi 
©d^Iuffc beS brittcn OüattalS 13,131 mäntt* 
lid^e unb 1062 tociblidge ä^it^Itcbcr. tn ®in* 
trittSgclbem unb ©eitrögen gingen 88,240 
ä^ar! ein. ^ie Q^inal^mcn aus 2omU unb ®$* 
trabeitröaen ftiegen bon 15,196 SKor! im ©or* 
4aÇrc auf 17,536 2Äari in biefem SaÇre. «n 
Unterftü^ungen tourben inSgefammt 44,763.65 
^avl beraulgabt, unb s^ax: 

(ientraüaffc 2oîaïia^t 

m. m, 

JEcifcunterftüfeung 1,625.95 172.89 

Strbeitôlofcnuntcrftu^ung . 7,279.00 3,914.65 

Äranrcnunterftüöutid 13,318.00 1,408.40 

©ccrbiguttgêbci^Ifé 1,036.00 - 

©tréihínterftütuttg 10,703.63 1,926.56 

äRafarcgcIungSuntcrftü^ung . 815.28 482.00 

UmaugSunterítüfeung 971.30 

9iotl6fairunterfti$üiig 130.00 125.00 

SÄcd^tSfd^ufe 251.10 

©onftige unterftüfeungcn 106.50 



36,629.66 8,133.99 
^te Snttoiálung htê ©crbanbcê l^at im lau* 
fenbcn ^aíjvc gute gortfd^ritte Qemač^t 



ñu» 2)ettifi((anb. 



(ötrafeburg i. ®. S)er Streif in bcr 
©Ifäffifd^cn 3^aba!manufaftur ift, toie fd^on !ura 
bcridjtet, bccnbct. ^cr girma ift eS gelungen, 
eine gro^e ñaf¡¡í bon Slr'beitStoilligen ¿u be!om* 
men, bie fi^ olgnc SSiuSnafime auS êtra^rg 
rcřrutirten. SWan foïïte eS nid^t für mdglid? 
galten, ba% fid^ in einem STrbcitcrbiertcI toie 
^euborf eine fo qrofec S^^I STrbcitStoiUigcr fin* 
ben íonnte, bie tl^rcn ïompfcnbcn Kolleginnen 
in bcn SRüden fielen, itm einem Unternehmen, 
hoQ im Ocfd^oftSjal^r 1911 einen D'lcingetoinn 
bon über einer Bulben S^iHion eraieite, nod^ au 
größerem ©ctoinne gu bcrl^clfcn. SMc ÎÎrbcit 
foïïte nun am 11. Sfîobcmbcr bon ben ©treuen* 
ben aufgenommen tocrben. S)er S>ircItor gfcifti 
crrlörte, ha^ folange er im ©ctriebc fei, ïciner 
ber ©trciïcnben meÇr eingcftcïït toerbc. ?Îd^t«g 
Aoïïcginncn finb tnfolgcbcjfen auSgcfbcrrt, oie 
nod^ nid^t untergebradöt tocrbcn ïonntcn. StoS 
©etocrrfd^aftsïartcïl (Strasburg l^at in einer 
©idling bom 20. SRobcmbcr bcfd^Ioffcn, ba% ber 
©o^ott über bie gabrüate ber ©If. ŠTabahnanu* 
faftur rxaái toie bor fortbaucrt. S>ie girma 
nrrfcnbct flcgcntoärtig an ibre .^nbfd^aft in 
gana ^utfdglanb ein SÄunbfd^rciben, in toel* 
(^cm fie ben STbncl^mcrn blaufibcl a« madden 
fwd6t, bafe ©treif mi ^Q^^H unbeçed&tigt gç« 



18 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



iocfen fcten, unb beruft fie fiti auf bit «rBeitt^ 
totlliaen, hie gu ben alten fioĎncn tocttcrarBeite*» 
ten, balder fetcn oucfi bie bon tÇt BeaaÇrten ßöCne 
tjoïïïommen ouíretd^enb. ñu affcnt UeBcrflufe 
ítc^ ftdj bie ^irma bon ber ¿anbel8!amnter eine 
©efcCetntgunö auSfteïïen. ?(n bteíem ?ÇTua6tatt 
tüirb ber ©aufeitung unb bent Oetoerřfd&afto* 
forteli borqetoorfen, fie Batten bie ¿íatfadjen 
in ein falfcÇeS fiidöt aerüdft unb burd& ben 95ol»* 
řott bie fïirma öcfd^ißt, oui íaBe fidö @tre«* 
unb ©otiřottleituna Dom ^tanböuntt ber ©e* 
hjerrfcöaften au8 «ine« unerlaubt teid^tferttgen 
îBorfieÇenô f^uïbia gemadSt, toeil ber ^butči* 
f(5nitt8lo5n bon Scannern, grauen unb Siuaenb* 
lidien gufammen Bered^net iuorben ift. ßierau 
fei Bemerřt, bafi bie bon un8 beröffentli^ten 
fiööne bon ber gtnna feTBft ftotnmen, unb mat 
aus tÇren eigenenř fîoÇnliften, bie unS bont Söür* 
qermeiftcramt gtocdö ^Berflleid^unfl sur ©er* 
füaung geftellt ipurben; haS ift bod^ aetoift un* 
onfed^tBare« SWaterial, berel&rte 2)ire!tionI 
SBctter faßt bo8 glugBIatt, ba^ ba9 ©ürflermet* 
fteramt ba9 bon unS BeiqeBradftte JBergTeidj«* 
material nid5t für bergleidöbar íteít. 3Baô íüir 
afinten. "bat bie JÇirma nun feïbft beftöttgt. S)oS 
©erňleidŘSmoterial ftammte bormtegenb bon 
fübbeutfd^en ginnen, gum 5ïeiï fogar bon fol* 
döen, bie bie aíeidSen SÎrbeitêmet^oben Caben, 
tnie bie (5Tf. S^abařmanufařtur, aber bebeutenb 
bobere fiobne gablen. $)aŘ biefe girmen bin* 
ftáitltdĎ ber öej^abltcn ßöCne nidjt au ben eTfâffi* 
fd&en baffen, glauben toir redftt gem. 2)en ©or* 
tourf be§ a:erroriSmuS Ireift baë ©ctoerrfdjaft«* 
fartelï unb bie ®auícttung aan;» entfdöieben ^n* 
tM. Œê ift nur unfer gefefeiidö aetoabrIeiftcteS 
JRedöt ausgeübt toorben. ^afe bie girma ein 
i^cinb beê Äoalitionered^teS ber $írbciter ift, bat 
fie ia ittebrmaiS im ©eretn mit bcr ^oligei be* 
micfen, inbem ©treiřícitung unb ©treifcoften 
mit ©crbaftung gcbrobt hjurben. toenn fie fid^ 
nid6t entfernten. STuf tneldfter (Seite ^crroriS* 
mug geübt mirb, betoeifen bie fd^tpar^en Siften. 
bie an bie übrigen Untcrnebmer ©tra&burgS 
berfnnbt toerben. fo baft bie SíuSgefpcrrten in 
feinem anberen 93erufe unter!ommen. S)a8 ift 
î^crronêmiiê im toabren (Sinne beS SBorteS. 
^aau, ba^ in bem 93ctriebe ÎÎrbeiterinnen finb, 
bie für iure 25iäbrige S^bätigleit beforirt mor* 
ben ftnb, braudöt ein SBort berloren m trerben. 
3Wnn barf nur bie î)e!onrten betradjten, menn 
biefe bon ober nad^ ber gabri! gelten: bon mei* 
tem fiebt.man biefen Sinnen fd^on bie ïflotfi an. 
ïï^enn ftd& bie girma jefet freut, baf\ bie Organi* 
fation aus bem betrieb entfernt ift, mirb bod^ 
nodi) eine 3«i^ řommen, too man fidj trofc alle* 
bem mit ber Orgonifation abfinben muft. STn 
bcr nötbigen Sínfříorung ber berbleibenben Sír* 
beiter ttnrb c3 ntdTjt feblen; aud^ biefe toerben 
nodň etnfcbeit, \v\c iinbernünftig fie gegen ibre 
.^íüíícginncn gebanbeít bnben. S)a ber ber* 
bäiigie SQoDíoit mit bem (Strciř ^ufammen nidr)t 
niifaciiül)cn iuurbc. ift ble 5:)íreřtion um eine 
.Ooffnuim ärmer gclDorbcn. Sin bie organifirte 
MoIícacnfiŤinft rirf)len tuir ben Sippeïï, überall 
für ben 93ol)řott ber SBnaren ber ©Ifäffifdnen 
î'abrtrmnnufartur ^ropaganba au maď)en. ®ie 
,C>erren foffen nid^t glauben, ba^ fie mit unS 
madden řonnen, mag fie toollen. 



y následujieím obsaženy jsou některé zá- 
kony, týkající ee délnietya, jež přijala new- 
yorská zákonodárná r. 1912. 

Kapitola 185 stala ee zákonem 5. dubna 
1912. Komisař práce může nstanoviti ftas od 
Sašu ne více než sto dvacet pět továmícb 
inspeiktorfi, z nichž ne více než dvacet mob ou 
bfti ženy, .lež však odvolati mflže kdykoliv. 

Kapitola 331. přijata byla 15. dubna 1912. 
Zaměstnávání žen po porodu dítka jest za- 
pověizeno. Má být uznáv&no za nezákonité 
pro majitele, vlastníka, řiditele, dílovedou- 
cího neb jakou koliv jinou oaoTra mající auto- 
ritu v jakékoliv továrně, obchodě, prádelně 
neb dílně vědomě zaměstnávati ženu, nebo 
dovoliti zaměstnávati ženu. během ětvř t<'d- 
nfl DO tom, kdv dala život dítku. 

Kapitola 333. zákoniü z roku 1912 ustano- 
vule, ř.e žádné dítko přes 14 rokfl staré ne- 
může jíti do práce, dokud neobdrží certifikát 
od zdravotního úřadu. Takový certifikát ne- 
má h'Hi dříve vvdán. dokud takové dítko se 
oeobně nedostaví a není nrohlédnuto úřední- 
kem wdávaéjíí'ím certifikát, a dokiïd onen 
úředník po prohlídce dítka nepotvrdí a ne- 
uloží ve «vé úřadovně vviádření, že ono dít- 
ko může ?ÍRtí a zřetelně psáti iednoduché 
větv v anfirli<4cé ře?i. a žp dle jeho úsudku 
dítko ono jest řtrnáct rokfl staré nebo víre 
« že lest normÄlnfi vvvinnto na ono utáří. 
iest zdrav? a fvsickv schopna wkonávati 
onu práci, kterou přijati zp-mfšlí. Tento tä- 
kon vztahnie p<» pouze na města prvého řádu 
ve státu New York. 



Tlváfiímp následujíc! z Časopisu **Six Cent- 
uries of Work and Labor**. coŽ napsal Th. 
Roerens, professor politického hoispodá-řství 
na universitě Oxford v Anglii: "Svědectví 
přítomné doby a příklady z minulosti doka- 
znií. Že dělnické spolky jsou lékefc proti níz- 
kým mzdám. TTvádě.ií zaiisté zaměstnavatele 
v nesnáze. Dělnické orpranisace požadují pro 
sebe větSÍ díl z celkového výtěžku promy- 
slového. Ony nutí jej (má-li uhájiti si svfij 
díl v tomto zápase, abv hledal «voji) pomoc 
v úspoře a v>Tiálezech aneb v lacinějším 
rentn." 



f«lověk. jpn3^ očekává a tu5í nemožnosti vcv 
vzrúsf hnutí řemeslných nnií. jest od60ii7en 
ke zklamání. Oeekávání zakládající se na 
ohrazotvornosti, mimo říSe skutků a stává ií- 
cích podmínek, nemohou se uskuteěniti. Hi- 
storicko postup ělověěenstva "byl pomaK-: 
kdv^koliv toto nřinilo rychlejěí postup. reakr»#> 
r^ «ledovala. Neváhlý pofïtup jest nejúap?a- 
nějSí za stávajících událostí. 



V<roba doutníku a smotkû řcheroots) v 
druhém a třetím new-vorskPm distriktu vui- 
trozomní daně. vřlžíeích více neŽ 3 libry ti- 
síc, za nřŽ hvln daň zaplacena za měsíc pro- 
sinec 1912. obnňSela ni.Sll.ROO kusú. Za ten- 
t^ž měsíc v roce 1911 byla daň zaplacena 
z 55.801.660. Toto ukazuje" vzrůst o 5.449.940 
proti témuž měsíci roku předcházejícího. 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



19 



Jednou z chudých ukázek v hnuti řemesl- 
ných unii jest pessimista éili âkarohiîd; není 
úspeSným jako ¿inný dělník, protože nemá 
žádnou důvěru v sebe ani v kohokoliv jiné- 
ho. Vyhýbaje se tožSí a účinné práci potřebné 
k přemožení odporu a lhostejnosti neunioni- 
9ty, má vdeliké liché výmluvy; podkopává 
tim naději a snahy uniových mužů a žen žá- 
dostivých úspěchu. Jest překážkou na cestě 
k pokroku. 



budeme moci přesvědčili zaméstnavatele^wže 
zaměstnanci to míní do opravdy. " 



Časopis ''Outlook" 
rento ¿istého výtěžku 
nich kapitál obnádelo 
ku továrníků. V roce 
stlo skoro na polovic. 
17,119 proč. výtěžku, 
1910 byly 12,041 pro 
želesnice. 



piâe: Boku 1900 pro- 
železnic na vložený do 

pouze -Stvrtinu výtěž- 
1910 procento to vzro- 
Továrníci měli r. 1900 

dráhy 4,650; v roce 
továrníky, a 5,729 pro 



Zákon omezující pracov í dobu žen na 54 
hodin týdně ve státě New Torku, prohlásili 
za ústavní soudce Blackmar předsedající ny- 
nějěímu soudu v Brooklyn, N. Y. Dle míně- 
ní soudu "svoboda žen uzavírati kontrakty 
na pfddávání své práce může býti pouze ji- 
ným názvem za nedobrovolnou službu stvoře- 
nou stávajícími průmyslovými podmínkami." 

Zpráva Industriální úrazové komise poda- 
ná zákonodárně v Harrisburg, Pa., obsahu- 
je mnphé zajímavé body, z nichž, vyjímáme 
toto: "VětSina úrazů povstává následkem 
přepracování: "Žádný jiný průmyslový stát 
nedovoluje ženám pracovati v továrnách 
dvanáct hodin denně ěili šedesát hodin týdně, 
jak přítomný továren^ký zákon dovoluje, a 
komise odporuěuje sníženi na omezení ženské 
práce v průmyslových závodech na deset ho- 
din denně ěili 54 hodin týdně. 

Úřední orgán Národní Federace řemesl- 
ných unií v Rakousku poěal 1. lednem 1913 
vycházeti denně v jazyku německém; jednou 
za čtrnáct dní v jazyku ěeském. Bylo též 
usneseno vydati po4ské vydání. Me^dní po- 
žadavky rukavi&kářů v Praze v Cechách by- 
ly továrníky zamítnuty. 



Statistika uveřejněná unií tabáČnických 
dělníků v Belgii (socialistické odvětví) uvá- 
dí 241 dílen, jež zaměstnávají 3345 mužských 
dělníků a (1736 ženských. Průměrná týdenní 
doba pracovní obnáší šedesát a půl hodiny; 
průměrná týdenní mzda jest 16 franků 46 
centimů, což se rovná asi $3.29 americké 
měny. 

časopis Railway Clerk" píše: "Organi- 
zovaná práce sem patří. Ona jest zde a zů- 
stane zde jako organizovaný kapitál. Gím 
dříve třída zaměstnavatelů se doví, že jejich 
zaměstnanci se organizuji za úoelem vzájem- 
ného prospěchu a podpory a jiných výhod, 
jež skýtá organizace, tím dříve si třída za- 
městnavatelů uvědomí, že hnutí ono jest stá- 
lým a že přináší s sebou zlepšení stavu, a pak 



Mendicantes Industriales. 

Los trabajadores han sido siempre demasía* 
do pronos á aprovecharse de la fuerza de las 
uniones de gremios transitoriamente, con el 
proposito de enderezar los más pesados agra- 
vios del presente inmediato y, una vez que ese 
resultado se ha obtenido, abandonan á la unión 
hasta que les amenaze otra nueva opresión. 

Mientras tanto, muy á menudo tienen la fan- 
tasía de hablar con desdeño d¿ la unión, di- 
ciendo que es "débil" ó que "no sirve," cuando 
la verdad es que si la unión es débil, est sim- 
plemente y solamente porque los que le deben 
muchos favores y tienen la obligación moral 
de soportarla, han rehusado de prestarle la 
menor ayuda. 

Un mendigo es uno que solicita limosnas sin 
ofrecer nada en cambio y á veces se le llama 
también mendicante. 

Un salariado que trata por medio de la 
unión de obtener salarios más elevados y que 
evita de dar la menor cosa á la unión en cam- 
bio, se puede propiamente llamar mendicante 
industrial. 

Estos mendicantes industriales tienen la gran 
culpa de las fluctuaciones en el número de los 
miembros de las uniones de gremios. Acuden 
á ella temporalmente cuando se presenta un 
melón que cortar bajo la forma de una au- 
mentación de salarios y tan pronto se ha ob- 
tenido la susdicha aumentación, se mandan 
mudar tan pronto como han venido. 

Si todos los salariados que hasta la fecha 
han ingresado las uniones de gremios hubieran 
permanecido en ellas como miembros leales, 
la labor estaría ahora casi completamente or-' 
ganizada, sino completamente. 

£1 por ciento de los organizados seria tan 
grande que no ser unionista no pasaría por 
elegante y tal vez por seguro y todos los que 
todavía se encontrarían fuera de la unión, in- 
gresarían de súbito. 

Los mendicantes industriales son bastante 
numerosos en el ramo del tabaco. Tienen la 
deplorable reputación de haber ingresado y 
abandonado muchas uniones, sin quedar fírmes 
en ninguna. 

Han demorado la organización de una ma- 
nera asombrosa, por la razón que sean cuales 
fueran las condiciones industriales que militen 
en favor de la aumentación del número de 
miembros de una unión, el trabajo que se 
tiene que hacer primero es reunir una vez más 
á los mendicantes industriales, y para lograrlo, 
se gasta un tiempo precioso. 

Si las uniones de gremios fueran capaces de 
conservar las ganancias que logran en el nú- 
mero de sus miembros de temporada en tem- 
porada, de manera que las ganancias obtenidas 



20 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



en una temporada sean netas, el progreso sería 
más rápido y las oportunidades de mejorar 
los salarios y las condiciones infinitamente más 
numerosas. 

Los miembros que tienen conciencia en el 
cumplimiento de sus obligaciones hacia su 
unión, tanto en el asunto del pago de sus con- 
tribuciones como en él de prestar ayuda per- 
sonal y servicios á la causa unionista, se han 
de dar cuenta del mal enorme que hacen los 
mendicantes industriales al movimiento. 

£1 mayor servicio que cualquier miembro 
bueno y activo de una unión de gremios puede 
prestar, es de despertar á esos miembros in- 
considerados, indiferentes ó faltos de integ^rí- 
dad haciéndoles notar cual es su deber, li- 
brando así la unión de sus mendicantes in- 
dustriales, lo que multiplicaría muchas veces 
las probabilidades de éxito de las uniones de 
gremios. 

Examine la lista de sus miembros, vea 
cuantos son inactivos y trate de encontrar un 
modo de hacerlos tomar su puesto de batalla. 

* * * 

Una crítica equitativa es á la vez honrosa y 
digna de alabanza; construir, edificar, mejo- 
rar, es una ambición generosa. Tener pacien- 
cia con los defectos de gente menos favorecida 
bajo el punto de vista del intelecto ó de la 
experiencia, es un caudal de valor. El de- 
signio de mejorar y de hacer lo que se debe, 
sin tener cuenta de la recompensa, es un rasgo 
de carácter inapreciable, 

* * * 

La producción de puros en el distrito de 
aduana interior de Florida sobre Ja cual se 
pagaron contribuciones durante el mes de di- 
ciembre de 1912, se sumó á 26,859,870 En el 
correspondiente mes del año 1911, se pagaron 
contribuciones sobre 27,147,390. , Resulta, pues, 
una diminución de 287,520 puros sobre la pro- 
ducción del mes correspondiente del año an- 
terior. 

Al tratar de mejorar las condiciones del 
ramo por medio de demandas de salarios me- 
jores, etc., no se ha de olvidar un factor im- 
portante. La organización de más que una 
mayoridad de los trabajadores del ramo es 
esencial y en muchos casos îndispçnsable para 
mantener las concesiones hechas por los manu- 
factureros bajo la presión del momento. Una 
organización permanente y fidelidad á la causa 
del unionismo son también de primera utilidad. 

« « * 

La fabricación y la venta del tabaco, de 
puros y de cigarros en España, aunque sea un 
monopolio estricto del Gobierno, no la hacen 
funcionarios de Gobierno en fábricas que per- 
tenecen al Gobierno, como es el caso en Fran- 
cia y en Austria-Hunraria, sino que esta a- 

rrcndada 6 una compafífa especialmente orga- 



nizada para ese propósito, quien paga al Go- 
bierno una suma estipulada por la concesión. 
La compañía que está encargada del mono- 
polio del tabaco en España se llama Compañía 
Arrendataria de Tabacos y su contrato actual 
con el Gobierno español fué firmado por un 
período de 25 años, principiando á correr en 
1896. 

4í * « 

El empleo del tabaco aumentó de tal ma- 
nera entre los Italianos en los pocos decenios 
que siguieron su introducción, que en 1624 el 
Papa Urbano promulgó un edicto excomuni- 
cando à todos los fumadores y tomadores de 
rapé. Este edicto fué renovado más tarde por 
el Papa Inocente XII, pero fué revocado últi- 
mamente por el Papa Benedicto XIV, quien 
era tomador de rapé inveterado. La revoca- 
ción del edicto contra el tabaco fué emitida en 
1724, exactamente 100 años después de la pro- 
mulgación de la defensa original 

* * * 

Uno de los peores ejemplares en el movi- 
miento de las uniones de gremios es el pesi- 
mista; no sirve como trabajador activo para 
la causa, porque no tiene confianza en sí mis- 
mo ni en nadie. Asustándose del penoso y 
activo trabajo que se necesita para vencer á 
la apatía y la indiferencia del que no pertenece 
á uniones, presenta las excusas más fútiles; 
minando á las esperanzas y á las aspiraciones 
de los que tienen la ambición de obtener éxito. 

Es un obstáculo en el camino del progreso. 

* * * 

La clase obrera se puede favorecer á sí 
misma por medio de la co-oper ación y de la 
acción inteligente; se puede favorecer por 
medio dé la organización y la adopción de 
planos rentísticos, sociales y morales. Se puede 
favorecer á sí misma al permitir á sus hijos 
recibir una educación decente; al mejorar sus 
hogares y su vecindad y al utilizar sus horas 
desocupadas estudiando ó gozando de un re- 
creo saludable. 

Los salarios bajos son un atropezadero en 
el camino del progreso y de la civilización ; mi- 
nan la vitalidad de jóvenes y vieios. Los sala- 
rios bajos procrean la tuberculosis y las enfer- 
medades contagiosas; zapan al hogar y á la 
familia, destruyen la esperanza y producen al 
pesimismo, preparando el camino para la seni- 
lidad prematurada y la muerte. 

* * * 

El hombre que espera y anticipa imposibili- 
dades en el crecimiento del movimiento de las 
uniones de gremios está condenado á llevarse 
un chasco. Las expectaciones fundadas sobre 
la imaginación, fuera del dominio de los he- 
chos y de las condiciones que rigen la vida, 
no se pueden realizar. El progreso histórico 
de la humadidad se ha desarrollado con mucha 
jentitud. Cuantas veces lo ha hecho rápida» 



CIGAR MAKBBS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



21 



mente, ha habido poco después una reacción. 
EI progreso gradual es el que mejor dura en 
el curso del tiempo. 

« « 4i 

Las principales enmiendas á la constitución 
propuestas en el Estado de Ohio que han sido 
ratificadas por el pueblo durante en otoño pa- 
sado, 4on las siguientes : 

Primero : Iniciativa y referendum ; 

Segundo: Jornada de ocho horas en obras 
públicas ; 

Tercero: Supresión de la labor de cárceles 
por contrato; 

Cuarto : La oposición al gobierno por medio 
de mandamiento fué vencida por un voto de 
257,302 contra 240,896. 

« * « 

£1 hecho que la labor de menores se per- 
mite todavía en fábricas-, talleres y minas en 
varios estados, e& una .violación flagrante de 
los derechos humanos y de la protección que 
se debe á la infancia; es una mancha en nues- 
tra civilización. La ley que permite á la co- 
dicia y á la avaricia de rapiñar la salud y la 
vida misma de infantes para acumular for- 
ttmas es una reliquia de las épocas de super- 
stición y de ignorancia, del sistema brutal de 

la feodalidad. 

* * * 

£1 trabajo de organizar y de educar á los 
trabajadores en uniones protectivas, encientes 
y promovedoras es una tarea estupenda y el 
éxito alcanzado á pesar de la oposición y la 
obstrucción que la rodean, no es menos estu- 
pendo. 

Si á este trabajo se le permitiera proceder 
de manera natural y legitima, sus mejoramien- 
tos se extenderían á cada fase de la existencia 
nacional. 

Desgraciadamente, no es este el caso, pues 
al medio del camino de la labor organizada 
se encuentra la doble iniquidad permitida por 
la forma republicana del gobierno, el juez man- 
datarío y la corte capitalistica. 

£1 informe de la Comisión de Accidentes 
Industríales 4 la legislatura de Harrisburg, 
Pa., contiene muchos puntos interesantes, en- 
tre los cuales citamos los que siguen: "Una 
de las causas de accidentes más fértiles es el 
trabajo excesivo. Ningún otro estado manu- 
facturero importante permite que se empleen 
mujeres por jomadas de doce horas y sesenta 
horas por semana, como lo permiten las pre- 
sentes leyes fábricas-; y la comisión recomienda 
que se limiten las horas de trabajo para las 
mujeres en establecimientos industriales á diez 
por día y á cincuenta y cuatro horas por se- 
mana." 

« * * 

£1 informe oficial de la Aduana de Cuba 
demuestra que las exportaciones totales de 



puros, desde el primero de enero de 1912 
hasta el 31 de diciembre del mismo año, à 
todos los países extranjeros, se han sumado á 
178,981,472. En el año anterior las remesas 
totales se sumaron á 188,129,188; sea una di- 
minución de 9,147,716 puros en el año pasado 
comparada la exportación á la del anterior. 

« * * 

Los importadores de tabaco en hojas, que 
incluyen varios manufactureros, favorecen una 
reducción de derechos sobre las hojas apro- 
piadas para envolturas, de $1.85 por libra á 
un peso y sobre las rellenaduras, de 85 centa- 
vos á 20 centavos por libra. Bajo el tratado 
de reciprocidad con Cuba existe una reducción 
de veinte por ciento sobre las tarifas actuales. 



Dans les fabriques placees sous le controle 
de l'Etat en France, lequel a le monopole pour 
la fabrication des cigares, cigarettes, tabac à 
fumer, etc., les employés comprenaient en 1910, 
178 fonctionnaires salaríés, 878 personnes tra- 
vaillant dans le département technique, y com- 
pris 176 femmes, plus 2,030 ouvriers et 12.Ö02 
ouvrières. En 1909, les employés compre- 
naient 1,965 hommes et 12,362 femmes. La 
moyenne des salaires de 1901 à 1905 pour une 
journée de travail de dix. heures, était de cinq 
francs soixante-dix sept centimes pour les 
hommes et de trois francs quatrevingt cen- 
times pour les femmes (100 centimes égalent 
un franc qui est vingt cents en argent améri- 
cain). De 1906 à 1910, la moyenne des salaires 
pour les hommes s'est élevée à six francs 
quarante quatre centimes et pour les femmes, 
à quatre francs quarante centimes. Les 
heures de travail ont été réduites à neuf par 

journée. • 

* * * 

Sous l'Acte Britannique d'Assurance, qui 
entra en vigueur le premier janvier 1913, 
chaque ouvrière a droit, en accouchant, à une 
somme de $7.50. Ce n'est par beaucoup, mais 
cela aide à défrayer les frais. Le caractère 
de cette législation indique un tournant dans 

l'histoire industrielle. 

* * * 

Lhomme qui attend et anticipe des impossi- 
bilités dans la croissance du mouvement des 
unions de métiers est condemné au désap- 
pointement Les espérances basées sur l'imagi- 
nation, en dehors du domaine des faits, placées 
hors de l'influence des conditions de la vie, ne 
peuvent être réalisées. Le progrès historique 
de l'humanité a été lent; partout oti il a avancé 
à grands pas, la réaction n'a pas manqué de 
se produire. Le progrès graduel est le plus 
durable dans le cours des événements. 

* * * 

Nous extrayons ce qui suit de "Six siècles 
de travail et de salaires" par Thorold Rogers, 






CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



professeur d'économie politique à Oxford, An- 
gleterre : 

"L'évidence du présent l'exemple du passé 
paraissent prouver que les associations du tra- 
vail sont le remède contre les salaires inñmes. 
Elles mettent sans aucun doute le patron dans 
une situation dificile. Elles réclament une 
part plus grosse pour le labeur dans la répar- 
tition des bénéfices de l'industrie. Elles l'obli- 
gent (s'il veut maintenir sa place dans la lutte) 
à trouver son remède dans l'économie du gas- 
pillage, dans le développement de l'invention 
ou dans la réduction du loyer." 



Les travailleurs peuvent s'aider eux-mènaes 
au moyen de la co-opération et de Taction in- 
telligente; ils peuvent s'aider eux-mêmes par 
l'organisation et par l'adoption de plans des- 
tinés à leur donner un avancement financier, 
social et moral. Ils peuvent s'aider eux-mêmes 
en permettant à leurs enfants d'obtenir une 
éducation convenable ; en améliorant leurs de- 
meures et leurs alentours et en utilisant leurs 
heures de loisir par l'étude et une récréation 

salubre. 

* * * 

Les salaires bas sont la pierre d'achoppement 
dans le chemin du progrès et de la civilisa- 
tion; ils épuisent le sang, vital des jeunes 
comme des vieux. Les salaires bas engendrent 
la tuberculose et les maladies contagieuses; 
ils minent le foyer et la famille, détruisent 
l'espoir et créent le pessimisme; ils pavent 
enfin la voie à la décrépitude prématurée et 

à la mort. ♦ , 

* « * 

La critique équitable est à la fois honorable 
et digne de louanges ; l'ambition de construire, 
d'édifier, de faire mieux, est légitime. Sup- 
porter patiemment les défauts des gens moins 
bien -donés en intelligence et en experience, 
voilà un fonds de valeur. Lambition d'amélio- 
rer et de faire bien, sans égard à la récom- 
pense, est un trait de caractère qui n'a pas de 

prix. 

* * * 

Exigez l'estampille de l'union et donnez au 
mouvement des unions de métiers une poussée 
vers le haut. Chaque emplette, pour infime 
qu'elle soit, vous met dans la tète la nécessité 
d'aider les camarades dans les autres métiers. 
Lestampille d'unbn est notre drapeau de ba- 
taille dans le terrain d'opérations de la guerre 
> industrielle. Comme un soldat dans la lutte 
pour de meilleures conditions, vous devez vous 
rendre compte qu'en la demandant toujours 
et en faisant de son emploi la règle de votre 
existence, vous inspirerez à d'autres le désir 
de se battre en faveur d'un mouvement qui a 
déjà accompli tant de choses. 



Frédéric Palmer écrit dans le "Hamptdti's 
Magazine": "Je me puis me rendre compte 
comment quelqu'un peut étudier le sujet sans 
croire que, dans les présentes relations du 
capital et du labeur et de la société, les unions 
sont la seule protection qu'aient les ouvriers." 
Norman Hapgood dit dans "Coiner's": 
"Aucune force simple a fait davantage pour 
nous éduquer, pauvres et riches, que les unions. 
Dans le labeur, l'association a fait tant de bien, 
que le mal qui en est dérivé incidemment est 
comparativement minime. Lunion a été ap- 
pelée l'école publique des travailleurs. Elle 
est davantage. Elle est l'introductrice d'une 
discussion équitable entre le pauvre et le 
riche." 



Lhomme qui porte sur lui une carte d'union 
qu'il ne respecte pas, ou qui ne fait aucun ef- 
fort pour obtenir que d'autres se rallient à 
son union, ou qui s'abstient de participer aux 
meetings de son union sans avoir une bonne 
raison pour le faire, ou qui se refuse à accom- 
plir un devoir qu'il doit à son union, ou qui 
achète des marchandises non-unionistes alors 
qu'il pourrait s'en procurer d'unionistes, est 
aussi inutile à son union qu'une oie dans une 
ferme d'autruches. — Los Angeles Citizen. 

Les stati^iques officielles pour le Canada 
tout entier pendant l'année fiscale 1912 mon- 
trent une impartation totale de 1-52,456 livres 
de cigares, évaluées à $613,232. Cuba fouriiit 
la tot^ilité de ce chiffre, moinsenviron un dou 
zième, les Etats-Unis n'ayant que cette pro- 
portion dans la transaction. Comme contraste 
avec l'importation, on roula au Canada pen- 
dant la même période, 248,906,934 cigares, de 
sorte qu'une évaluation modérée établit que 
l'importation ne constitue qu'un quinzième en- 
viron de la consommajtion de cigares du 
Canada. Le tabac en feuilles importé dans le 
Dominion pendant l'année s'est élevé à 17,- 
203,513 livres, évaluées à $4,434,757; sur ce 
total, 15,472,599 livres, évaluées à $3,802,437 
provenaient des Etats-Unis, pendant que le 
reste était à peu près également divisé entre 
le tabac cubain et l'East Indian Wrapper im- 
porté via Grande Bretagne, Belgique et 
Allemagne. 

♦ ♦ * 



Le Parlement de la Nouvelle Galles du Sud 
a passé un Bill qui réglemente la journée de 
huit heures dans les mines à charbon. Au 
cours de la grève des mineurs à Waihî, Nou- 
velle Zélande, soixante six unionistes furent 
envoyés en prison pour une année parce qu'ils 
avaient refusé de donner un cautionnement 
garantissant leur bonne conduite future. La 
grève, qui fut perdue, était une protestation 
contre la cour d'arbitrage obligatoire. La loi 



CIGAB MAKEfiS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



23 



qui pourvoit à cette cour a été en vigueur 
depuis près de vingt ans. 

* 4i * 

Les statistiques publiées par l'Union des 
Travailleurs en Tabacs de Belgique (succur- 
sale socialiste) couvrent 241 fabriques, qui 



emploient 3,345 hommes et 1,736 femmes. La 
moyenne des heures de travail par semaine est 
de soixante et demie; la moyenne des salaires 
par semaine est de seize francs quarante six 
centimes, ce qui équivaut à $1^.29 en monnaie 
canadienne. 



ORGANIZERS* MONTHLY REPORT 



Harrisburg, Pa., Féb. 7, 1913. 

Conditions throughout the cigarmaking 
enters of Pennsylvania have not undergone 
very much of a change during the past few 
montais. Indeed, it may truthfully be said 
that no noticeable change, at least so far 
as extended organization among the cigar- 
makers is concerned, has taken place. 

During the past two months I have vis- 
ited Denver, Reading, Maytown, Harris- 
burg, Ephrata, York, Terre Hill, Akron, 
Columbia, Rothsville, McSherrystown, Al- 
lentown, Einaus and Lititz. The factories 
at all of these places work full time, and 
in some instances overtime just before and 
up to the Christmas holidays. Practically 
all of the factories in this territory have 
resumed operations since the holiday sea- 
son and are working steady. 

The work of trade union education among 
the unorganized cigar makers is going 
steadily forward, however, and I expect on 
my next visit to the points I have covered 
in preliminary work will result in some 

awakening among our fellow craftsmen who 
haye thus far failed to be convinced that 
membership in the Cigarmakers' Interna- 
tional Union is the most proñtable invest- 
ment that a cigarmaker can possibly make. 

During the month of January I partici- 
pated for one week in the "Labor Forward" 
movement that is being conducted under 
the auspices of the trade union's of Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. In my judgment much good 
to the trade union cause can be gained 
through forward movements of this char- 
acter, and it is quite gratifying to note that 
the executive council of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, at its last meeting, took 
favorable action on this question, and have 
referred the matter to Secretary Frank 
Morrison to work out a comprehensive plan 
for a nation wide labor forward movement 
under the direction of the A. F. of L. The 
influence of the Syracuse forward move- 
ment is not conñned to that city alone, but 
has already extended to the cities and 
towns within a radius of a hundred miles. 
Eastern Pennsylvania is badly in need of a 
waking up of this kind.' 

From Syracuse I proceeded to South 



Bethlehem, Pa., stopping at Elmira, N. Y., 
on the way. Elmira cjgarmakers enjoy a 
100 per cent organization, yet it requires a 
constant agitation on their part in favor 
of home product, in order to keep pace 
with the outside non-union brands that are 
constantly being dumped into the local mar- 
ket. Notwithstanding the keenness of the 
competition, the members of Union 52, by 
judicious agitation, including newspaper ad- 
vertising, increased the output of Elmira 
made cigars to such an extent that the 
membership of the union grew from 40 to 
72, which seems to prove conclusively the 
value of energetic label agitation. 

At South Bethlehem, Pa., I appeared be- 
fore the annual convention of the Pennsyl- 
vania Federation of Liquor Dealers and se- 
cured from them a unanimous endorsement 
for union made cigars, and a recommenda- 
tion to their members that, when purchas- 
ing cigars, they pay due regard to the em- 
blem of fairly paid labor. So far as I am 
informed, this is the first declaration of this 
kind we ever had from the retail liquor deal- 
ers in the state of Pennsylvania. 
Fraterrally, 

E. E. Greenawalt, Organizer. 



No man ever regrets being manly, hon- 
est, truthful, honorable, a gentleman, kind 
to everybody, a foe to the knocker, true to 
your friends, a lover of your home, of a 
happy disposition, hospitable to your 
guests, fair with your employer, patriotic 
to your country, forgetful of your troubles, 
man enough to admit them, careful in all 
you do and say, temperate in all your hab- 
its, the best workman in the shop, without 
malice toward any one, clean of speech as 
well as body, able to see your own mis- 
takes, loyal to your wife or sweetheart, con- 
siderate of women and children, generous 
with your friends and enemies, as neatly 
dressed as your circumstances will allow, 
interested in your employer's welfare as 
well as your own, of such value to him that 
he has to be fair with you and being appre- 
ciative of the fact that there is some good 
in every man. 



CIOAH MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOTTBNAL 



OFFICIAL 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

Q. W. PKRKIN«, PrMldant. 

UoDon Bids., Chloico. 

■AUUBL aOUFERB. Box M, N«w Tork Cltjr, 

Flrat Vlca Prw. 
TH08. F. TBACT, 11 Applaton «L, Boaton. 

Mhu.. Saoond Vlca Prw. 
A. OÄBinPT, H» Ar*. Hotel D« TIU«, Uontraal, 

Con., Third Vlca Fraa. 
W. U. nTZOBIUü:.D, Tt« DlTlalOB St., Portlud. 

Ora., í\)urtli Vlca Pra«, 
t. P. HOFFUAN, e» Raid St., JukMUTÜla^ 

— ., Flíti Vice Praa. 



iL.^";-^^^í¿Sí ».. m—..«* »■«,., g;ř SSA'fJ-ÍSZÍÍI 



NOTICE T.0 LOCAL UNIONS. 
Wh*n applylna (ar ratlrlng carda raad Um 
Conatltutlan. 

Aiwaya rafar to tha Conatltutlan whan yeur 
intaraata ara In vol vad. 

Whan m, mambar chansaa from ttio Mo to tlio 
tOa Uat. or rattrw Abaolutalj, ail wartona tmiům 
In ifoaaeaaloii o( tha union ahould b« ratumad 

Bafora notlfjrlny tha oiSoa of th« daMh •( k 
banaftdaiT mambar oonault Saction Ui aad 
oonplT wltta aama, and U tha mambar haa « 
oajd dapcalted aand it aloi 
tlon, but taka & racord ot al 



UNION BUSINESS 

tlon Gl or tl 



Unlooa whan hotifylnff thla offloa cf cAaiwa Ib 
aaeratary wUI plaaaa aX ansa «tve tha naw aaa- 
ratur'a addraaa, U poaalM^ ao aa to obrlata 
dalayi, mlatakaa, ata. 



Financial aaoratailea whan mtmatJiig 
ahould, aa roaulrad br ■action foi antar 

la ftñiraa and lattar«, It ta 

punch curda. 



g London »200. 



»IM 
IM J« 

197 Vi 

200 a 

MSB 

ins 
toi o 

2S8 K 
111 V 
»4 B 
»T Bi 
»S B 
»2 9 

24S C 
160 B 
IST L 
íes 81 
S(S D 
»T a 
ÍTO F 



IT C¿.nton 

IS Qlena FEÜla... -_. 
10 Mlchtffan CICr W. 



IS Uoumouth 



is M'6herTntown200. 



13 Sbeboygan . . 

¡g Crestón 

¡9 Fond du Lac. 
It San DlSKO 

14 Samtoga — uv. 
10 Tmveras City BO. 



Union 192, Manchester. N. H.. halda tlO -- 
Simon Goldsmith, Brooklyn, N. T., In conncctloi 
witli the Bentley fund, which he may obtain b' 
--"' — ■- "- ~ Mr, J. F. Conway, 8! 



this month. An ad 

each secretary on Fi 

The codlflcatlon or 

by the Baltlmoi 



constitution, authorized 

.jllon, and submitted to 

January 11th, mas practically 



popular vote o 
unanimously appro vea. 
On January 38, 1913. we mailed t 

monthly reports, etc.. aa follows: L, ..._ , 

financial report blanks, 12 state of trade blanks, 
12 out-of-work and loan report blanka, 2 of- 
ncera' -elect blanks. 5 label custodian report 
blanks and SO supply order blanka. 






DECISIONS OP PRESIDENT 

nat 9T, Boa- 
ruled that 
in d case woere me iuzacuuve uoard, whlcb 
under their laws la dealKtiated as tha Court of 
Oyer and Terminer, tries a member and nnds 
him not KUllty that tha daclslon ot the bo«rd 
Is nnal and that the union cannot asaln act up- 
on the case or approve or disapprove the action 
ot the Board. The appellant claim* that the 
ruling makes the executive Board superior to 
the union which created It, and further bold* 
that In all caeea any action taken by the lo<^ 
executive board Is subject to the appiDral or 
msapprovai of the union. The app«il waa aus- 

Charlas Meadows appealed against ST, Boston, 
for adopting a law wlilch provides that a noral 
piece shall be sent to the house of any de- 
ceased member. The appeal waa sustained. 

Charles Meadows appealed against tT, Boston, 
for adopting a law nving the local executive 
board the right to donate funds to unions on 
strike and to levy an assessment for tha pur- 
-' epUcIng aame. The appeai waa aua- 



for adoptlDK a law providing that In the c 

the death of a member who had not bean aucn 

long enough to entitle him to death benefit a 

sum not to exceed ITS should be appropriated ' 

for burial purposes. Tba decision la that the 

union may levy a voTvntary asseasment for this 

purpose. 

A. Winfrey appealed against ITO, West PÄm 
fining him for non-attendance* at 
The appeal was not sustained. 

P, Anderson appealed against Tl, Stuiduakr. 
concerning the date of hfs reported alcknesa. 
The appeal was not sustained. 

H. Wlberg appealed against 98, 8(. Paul, for 
refusing him a loan. The union replied tliat 
there were Jobs open which the member could 
nave had. The appeal was not sustained. 

I. Ruhen appealed against 94. Pawtuchet, for 
suspending him for non-payment of dues. The 
appeal was not sustained. 

Wm. Loumach appealed against 178, Brandon, 



CIGAB MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



25 



for charsins him with drawin^^ illegal benafits. 
The appeal was not •uatained. 

JEL J. Blum et al. appealed a^^alnst 222, Peru, 
reierence the election of otflcers. The appeal 
was not sustained. ^ , 

W. J. O'Farrell appealed against 42. Hartford, 
for suspending him for non-payment of dues. 
The evidence shows that O'Farrell gave money 
to « itiend to pay the dues, but the friend was 
Injured in the meantime and forgot about it. 
Ths appeal was sustained. 

Chas. Schürf appealed against 487. Balcer. for 
fining him |10 for makine open head work |2 
below the bllL The appeal was not sustained. 

J. Treacy et al. appealed against 278. London, 
for reducing a fine on one of its members from 
125 to t5. The appeal was not sustained. 

J. Lk Whittey appealed against 92. Worcester, 
for not paying his claim for sick benefit. The 
appeal was not sustained. 

P. Heinlg appealed against 89. New Haven, 
for fining mm for failing to attend regular meet- 
ing. Appellant submits a certificate showing 
constitutional afiUctions, etc. The appeal was 
sustained. 

B. £. Bleut appealed against 209. Goldwater. 
for fining him 925 for working in a non-union 
shop. The appeal was not sustained. 

Guy Bruce appealed against 358. Fremont, for 
fining him for leaving without paying a board 
bill. Appellant shows that his carď was de- 
posited with the union as security and that he 
did leave, but the next week sent back money 
to pay tne board bilL The appeal was sus- 
tained. 

Max Strauss appealed against 37. Fort Wayne, 
for refusing to date his reported sickness back 
four days before he reported to the union. The 
appeal was not sustained. 

A. Schoenwlrth appealed against 213. New 
York, reference changing the date of the nomi- 
nation and election of officers. The appeal was 
not sustained. 

J. W. Long appealed against 4, Cincinnati, 
for suspending him for non-payment of dues. 
The appeal was not sust^.lned. 

Q. Ja, Whitemore appealed against 116. Cort- 
land, for Suspending him and fining him 160 for 
the alleged employment of a non-union man. 
The decision is that Mr. Whitemore be given a 
new trial and an opportunity to defend himself. 

Frank Weiland appealed against 111, Des 
Moines, for fining him for failure to parade on 
Labor i>ay. The appeal was sustained. 

F. Stehm appealed against 288, Sacramento. 
for fining him $25.00 and barring him from 
working In a certain shop. That part of the 
appeal reference the 125.00 fine was not sus- 
taineâ; that part of the appeal barring him 
from working in a certain shop was sustained. 

Lb Alezander, a 20 -cent member, appealed 
against 428, Trenton, for suspending and fining 
him 150.00 for refusing to quit his Job in a non- 
union shop. The appeal was not sustained. 

S. U. Williams appealed against 39, New Hav- 
en, for refusing to pay his claim of 117.50 for al- 
leged lost time on account of an action of the 
union. The appeal was not sustained. 

S. U. wmiams appealed against 39, New 
Haven, for not finding a member grullty and 
fining him. The appeal was not sustained. 

S. u. Williams appealed against the president 
of 39, New Haven, for falling to call a special 
meeting. Should first have appealed to the 
union. The appeal was not sustained. 

S. U. Williams appealed against 39, New Hav- 
en, for fining him $20 for an alleged difficulty 
with the foreman of the factory. The appeal 
was sustained. 

Union 880, Alpena, appealed against the action 
of the Financier In charging $40.00 Illegal sick 
benefit against Alex. Herman (57965) while on 
the 90-day suspension list. The appeal was not 
sustained. 



Decisions of International Executive Board. 

Washington, D. C, Jan. 27, 1913. 

Mr. G. W. Perkins, President Cigarmakere' In- 
ternational Union, Monon Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Dear Sir and Brother — On page 29 of the De- 
cember (1912) Journal there is published my 



communication regarding the decisions of the 
International Executive Board, and in which an 
error appears. I refer to the appeal of F. W. 
Carlson and the decision of the Executive Board 
thereon. The error occurred in the name an4 
number of the union. It appears in the case re- 
ferred to that Mr. F. W. Carlson is a member 
of Union 150. Sioux City. Iowa, whereas It 
should have been stated that he is a member 
of Local 20 of Decatur. 111. The error occurred 
because there were two appeals in my pos- 
session where the appellants are both named 
Carlson, the initials alone being different. You 
will please publish this letter in the forthcom- 
ing Journal and in the same department of the 
Journal in which my. report of decisions is 
printed. 

Fraternally yours, 

SAinjEL GOMPERS. 
First Vice-Président. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 

JANUARY, 1913. 

RECEIPTS. 

TAX. 



45 Springfield |100 

4 Cincinnati 200 

14 Chicago 100 

15 Chicago 200 

17 Cleveland 200 

34 Chippewa Falls. 100 
55 Hamilton 200 



• • • • 



200 
100 
100 
100 
200 
50 

236 Reading 200 

243 Chicago H'ghts 50 
247 Blue Island 50 

250 Belleville 50 

251 New York 200 



67 Champaign 
184 Bay City... 
192 Manchester 
208 Kalamazoo 
218 Bingham ton 
223 Ottumwa 



258 
268 
275 
277 
278 
288 
294 
804 
310 
811 
314 
318 
329 
334 
335 
342 
351 



Streator 


...1100 


Bscanaba . . . . 


.. 200 


Aberdeen 


.. 50 


Oskaloosa .... 


.. 50 


London 


.. 200 


Manheim 


... 50 


Duluth 


.. 50 


Racine 


.. 100 


Manistee 


.. 50 


Auburn 


.. 50 


Jackson 


.. 50 


Chattanooga . 


.. 100 


Fond du Lac. 


.. 100 


Saratoga 


.. 100 


Hammond ... 


... 50 


Batavia 


... 50 


Mankato 


... 50 



BOOKS AND VOUCHERS. 



187 
394 



294 
152 



Covington ... 
Sycamore . . . 
379 Rochester . . . 

2 Buffalo 

Duluth 

Youngstown 
47 Quincy 

52 Elmira 

124 Watertown .. 
242 York 

53 New Orleans. 

378 Brandon 

279 Plattsburgh . 
175 Kingston .... 
415 Elkhart 

28 Westfield .... 

61 La Crosse. . . 

348 Corning 

290 Janesville . . . 
240 Norfolk 

68 Albany 



18.00 172 Davenport ... 

1.00 104 Pottsvllle 

. 1.00 94 Pawtucket .... 

2.50 322 Joplin 

. 3.00 160 MUford 

, 2.60 214 Bluffton 

. 1.60 154 Lincoln , 

l.iO 184 Bay City 

. 1.00 130 Saginaw 

. 1.00 392 Lakeland 

. .50 61 La Crosse 

. .50 816 McSherrytown 
. 2.10|257 Lancaster ..., 

. 2.00 1 88 Dubuque 

. 1.00 483 Gloversvllle .. 

. l.BOJ 3 Paterson 

. 1.50 375 Anaconda ... 
. 1.00 372 Marshfleld . . . 
. 1.00 94 Pawtucket .. 
. 1.00 49 Springfield ... 
. .50 



\ .50 

.50 

.40 

1.00 

.50 

1.00 

1.50 

1.60 

1.00 

.SO 

.50 

5.00 

3.50 

1.00 

.50 

1.00 

.50 

1.00 

.50 

.50 



STATIONERY. 



208 Kalamazoo 
351 Mankato . 
100 Edgerton . 
20 Decatur . . 
412 Newport 



News 



476 Pontiac |3.50 

431 Litchfield 1.75 

367 Ogden 3.60 

13 New York 3.50 

471 Amerlcus 2.40 

134 Laporte 3.50Í143 Lincoln 

271 Rochester 1.751178 Olney 

224 Salt Lake 1.75|383 Chicago 

MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES. 

105 Maysvllle $ 

278 London 

231 Amsterdam 

140 St. Catherines 

205 Battle Creek 

227 Chicago 

94 Pawtucket 

48S MIddletown 

150 Sioux City 

320 Athens 

168 Oshkosh 

31 1 Auburn 

857 Vancouver 

72 Burlington 



11.75 
. 2.40 
3.r).) 
3.50 
, 3.5»» 
1.80 
1.2i) 
2.40 



3.50 
3.10 
1.10 
.3.05 
1.09 
1.00 
.65 
2.03 
1.35 
1.23 
2.57 
2.10 
1.75 
8.76 



26 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



6 Syracuse J.60 

38 Springfleld l.p 

98 St. raul 2.81 

'¿il Fargo ^.Jw 

¿iiH Wilmington 3.98 

2j¿ Oakland 2.50 

101 Spring Valley 10.»0 

182 Aladison 2.0ü 

114 Jacksonville 2.25 

305 Monmouth 1-05 

230 MillviUe 2.1U 

107 Krle '♦•öS 

:iU9 iiothâviUe, dates .40 

457 Benton Harbor, dales .40 

'< 9 Sandusky, dates .40 

186 Flint, dates .40 

Ö42 Batavia, dates .¡¡0 

58 Montreal, dates -ȟ 

145 VVilliarasport, dates .o5 

417 Dunkirk, dates .5» 

447 Kenosha, dates .07 

92. 95, 122, 197, 209, 243. L"J4. 314. 323, 

409, 441. 457, dates at lúe each 1.80 

168 Oshkosh, type 1.76 

244 Harrisburg, type -22 

42 Hartford, type 22 

485 Augusta, type -22 

173 Zanesville, type .44 

321 New Britain, type .10 

275 Aberdeen, cancelling stamp ■ <5 

87 Brooklyn, cancelling stamp .75 

172 Davenport, cancelling stamp .75 

362 Great Falls, cancelling stamp .7^ 

208 Kalamazoo, cancelling stamp .75 

467 Aredbo. cancelling stamp .75 

65 Lynn, Ink pad .40 

97 Boston, Ink pads * 2.10 

290 Janesvllle, laoel plate 1.00 

369 Sherman, label block l.Op 

185 Paducah, seal 1.00 

Returned funds, 252, Brunswick 173.15 

285 H. V. lUias, returned convention loan 10.00 
268 Fred Mulderick, returned convention 

loan 20.00 

120 Ed Hrhart, returned convention loan 10.00 

Receipts for January 14,199.12 

Balance January 1, 1913 1,281.83 

Total $5.480.95 

KXPENDITUIIES. 

Office rent % lOO.OO 

Salary to International I'resideni 155.00 

Salary to clerks 578.50 

Printing 3,030 blank cards membership.. 60.60 

Printing postals, form 1-2-3 6.25 

Printing stationery for local unions 15. Tu 

Printing tally sheets 4.00 

Printing 3,000,000 labels 360.00 

Printing December Journal 453. o:J 

Cartoon for Journal 10.00 

47% reams Journal paper 231.25 

Electros of label 1 .!•> 

Postage on Journals 41.21) 

Postals on letters and cards Gl. 98 

Postage on monthly report blank sup- 
plies 3G.90 

1,000 postals for form 3 10.00 

W. A. Campbell, salary •and expcn.se as 

Financier 37.». 00 

P. R. Martinez, salary and expense as 

Organizer 122.52 

J. K. Farrell, salary and expr use as Or- 
ganizer 25.00 

E. E. Greenawalt, salary and expense as 

Organizer 200.00 

A. Strasser, salary uO.OO 

International President, expense to 

Wiishington. tariff hearing 62. 2:) 

W. V. Todd, postage 3.27 

Kxpressape on labels and siippli«'s 77.17 

Tax on office 7.:{S 

Insurance on office fuiiiitinc and sup- 
plies K^^O 

Electric light ''■- í 

Telephone service S'^0 

Twine '}-'-\'j 

Carbon paper and noti« 1hm»1 s H.ss 

Ilepalrinff type manhln«- f» '*0 

Exchange on checks .5|> 

Parting labels to No. 14 1 .20 

Ink 2.25 

1 'arcel post map and scales 2.50 



Sundry supplies for office .- 4.21 

15 telegrams not prepaid 12.24 

Expense for January |3,111.28 

Balance Jan. 31. 1913 2,369.67 

Total 15,480.95 



PRICE LIST OF CASH SUPPLIES. 

(When ordering state quantity or number of 
articles wanted.) 

Charter 15.00 

Duplicate charter (state when organized).. .50 
*L.abel canceler, InclMdlnj^ type and Ink pad 
(when ordering state revenue district)... 6.00 

*Extra set of type for same (duplicate) 1.00 

•Extra plates for additional revenue dis- 
trict, each (when ordering state revenue 

district) 1.00 

•Factory numbers, logotypes (solid num- 
bers) in sets of five 22 

Ink pads for label canceler (8x4% or 8x39^), 

duplicate 35 

1,000 label order blanks, prepaid Sf- 

1 200-page register, prepaid 60 

1 100-page register, prepaid 40 

Electro cuts for advertising label, 2^x% in. .20 
Electro cuts for advertising label, 4^x1^ in. .25 
Duplicate set year dates, label canceler, 

commencing 1913, five years, prepaid 40 

•One cancelling stamp, complete, for due 

stamps 75 

Duplicate set year dates, due stamps, can- 
celer, good for five years 15 

•Union seal (state when organized) 1.00 

One set of books, consisting of 100-page 
ledger, day book and treasurer's account 

book 2.00 

200- page ledger or day book, charges "col- 
lect" 1.00 

300-page day book or ledger, charges "col- 
lect" 1.50 

100-page day book or ledger, charges "col- 
lect" 75 

400-page ledger, charges "collect" 3.00 

500-page ledger, charges "collect" 3.50 

One treasurer's account book, postage pre- 
paid 50 

•tetter heads, 500 sheets, prepaid 1.75 

•Letter heads. 250 sheets, prepaid .- 1.20 

•Envelopes, 500, prepaid 1.75 

•Envelopes, 250, prepaid 1.20 

Electrotypes for letter heads and envelopes, 

with block for tint background, prepaid.. 1.30 
700 treasurer's voucher receipts, book form,. 

perforated stub, prepaid 1.00 

The above articles will ONLY be shipped 
when the order for same is accompanied with 
the requisite amount. Orders to the contrary 
will not be recognized. 

REMIT AT TIME OF ORDERING SUPPLIES. 

LIST OF FREE SUPPLIES. 

Labels; 50c In. fee stamps; 30c due stamps; 
20c due stamps; 15c due stamps; 10c due 
stamps; membership appl. blanks; numbered 
due books; blank due l>ooks; blue trav. cards; 
loan cards; rt. cards: 90-day trav. cards; trans- 
fer cards; perm, with'l cards; 15-yr. with'l 
cards; loan receipt books; postal loan rec. cds.; 
personal loan receipts; designation (will) 
blanks; death report blanks; loss of employment 
cert.; O. of Wk. trav. cards; O. of Wk. reg. 
books; O. of Wk. receipt cards; O. of Wk. trav. 
certs.; O. of Wk. and loan receipt blanks; con- 
stitutions; sick relief certs.; monthly report 
blanks; officers-elect blanks; state-of-trade 
blanks; strike report blanks: •financial sees.' 
seal; organization ('¡rculars; supply order 
iilanks. 

•Have to be made or priiittd to ord*»r. 

BUREAU OF INFORMATION 

Emll R. Loff of La Grange, 111., would like to 
hear from Carl Streebeck. Address 32 N. Waiola 
avenue, La Grange, 111. 



CIGAR MAKERS^ OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



27 



Fred Dolby is requested to write to J. Dolby, 
who has news for him. By 278» London, Ont 

Frank and George Gates would like to know 
the whereabouts of their brother, John Gates 
(8079). Address 3 Buckley place, Troy, N. Y. 

Edward Guenther is requested to communicate 
with Timothy Fennel, care Union 39, New Hav- 
en, Conn. 

If Henri Pare will send his address to the 
secretary of 39, New Haven. Conn., ^e win re- 
ceive some money due him from A. G. P. 

William Giese, please write to your father, 
care of Fred J. Gardner, secretary 74, Pough- 
keepsie, N. T. 

Patrick Horan. 657 Pine street. Central Falls. 
R. I., desires to know the whereabouts of his 
son, Michael Horan. a cigarmaker. 

J. Joseph would like to hear from J. P. Sulli- 
van. Care of Union 42, Hartford. Conn. 

The parents of Bmll Kreamer are anxious to 
hear from him. Anyone knowing his address 
will confer a great favor by informing A. Wirz, 
Greenville. IlL 

H. O. Wolters. 2401 W. Lake, Chicago, 111., 
wantB to hear from his son, L*. H. Wolters. 

Any secretary knowing the whereabouts of 
Robt BS. Storenhel please notify Wm. M. Smith, 
Perkasle, Pa. Business of importance. 

Will John McNamee, formerly of Columbus, 
O.. please write to his old fHend, E. J. Guthrie, 
728 W. Duval street. Jacksonville, Fla. 

Union 28, Westfleld, Mass., would like to hear 
from T. J. Danzer on account of sickness of his 
wife. 



made a mistake in reporting and that the vote 
was 1 in favor and 13 against. 



State of Trade, February 1, 1913. 



REFERENDUM VOTE 

Tiie total aggregate vote upon each res- 
olution adopted by the Baltimore Conven- 
tion and submitted to popular vote is as 
follows: 

Resolution, For. -^.gainst. 

1 7,778 206 

2 7,756 332 

3 7600 174 

4 :: 71248 351 

6 7,610 141 

6 6,872 791 

7 7,187 415 

8 6.036 1,704 

9 7,471 669 

10 7,524 619 

U . 8.021 186 

12 6,884 792 

18 7,215 299 

14 : :..: 7,043 767 

15.*; 7,298 258 

16 ■ 6,519 889 

17 7,220 194 

18,*.. 11 7,097 229 

19 6,655 680 

20. ! 6,833 1,092 

21 6,995 364 

22.'!...! 7,168 148 

23 7,294 150 

24 7,785 184 

25 7.558 245 

26..!! 7.494 125 

27 7,717 153 

28 . 7,485 208 

29 7.572 123 

30 7,666 128 

31 7,222 317 

32 6,173 1,324 

33 7,462 95 

34.. 7,148 883 

36 7.764 226 

36 6,899 516 

37 7.284 336 

Correction — In the tabulated vote on amend- 
ments. Section 46, published in the January 
Journal, Union 206, I^rth Adams, Mass., report- 
ed 13 votes in isLVor and 1 vote against. In a 
letter dated February Sd the secretary says he 



QOOD. 



I 



12 Oneida 

17 Cleveland 

27 Toronto 

34 Chippewa Falls 

87 Ft. Wayne 

56 Hamilton 

68 Albany 

83 NaahTllle 
117 Pine Bluff 
122 Warren 
200 Ooldwater 
270 Plattaborgh 
808 Perkasle 
314 Jackson 
416 Norwalk 



FAIB. 



2 Buffalo 

ÎPaterson 
Cincinnati 
Utlca 
18 Brattleboro 

20 Decatur 

21 Marlboro 
24 Muskegon 
26 So. Norwalk 
28 Westfleld 

83 Indianapolis 
38 Sprlnsfleld 
43 Hartford 

46 Grand Rapids 

47 Quincy 
60 Keokuk 
62 Richmond 
66 Lewlston 

60 Three Rivers 
72 Burlington 
78 Alton 
70 Sandusky 
80 Danville 

84 Saugertles 

85 Eau Claire 
88 Dubuque 

80 Schenectady 
08 St. Paul 
00 Ottawa 

100 Edgerton 
103 Ansonla 

107 Erie 

114 Jacksonville 
128 Hamilton 
laO Saginaw 

181 Jersey City 
134 Laporte 
130 Appleton 
187 MassilloD 

140 St. Catharines 
150 81OOX City 
152 Tonngstown 

108 Sioux Falls 
154 lincoln 

159 Ht. Pleasant 
106 Suffleld 

160 Milford 

161 Denver 

163 MarysTlUe 

164 Ft. Collins 

165 PhlladelphU 

167 Owosso 

168 Oshkoeh 

170 W. Palm Beach 

171 B. Greenville 

172 Davenport 
174 JoUet 
190 Danbnry 

182 Madison 
186 Flint 

101 Morris 



103 Jefferson City 
1205 Battle Creek 
206 No. Adams 
210 Rome 
222 Peru 

231 Amsterdam 

232 Sellersvllle 
230 Reading 
247 Blue Island 
268 Oakland 
267 Sumneytown 
272 Lansing 
274 Pekin 

278 London 
282 Bridgeport 
288 Geneva 
288 Manhelm 
208 Glens Falla 
800 Michigan City 
904 Racine 
300 Rothsvllle 

320 Athens 

321 New Britain 
823 Sheboygan 
331 Grookston 
832 San Diego 
836 Hamm<Mid 
388 Eureka 

366 Havana- 
368 Pt. Huron 
378 Brandon 
304 Sycamore 

306 Waterbury 

307 Ionia 

400 Red Wing 
412 NewiXNTt News 
415 Elkhart 
417 Dunkirk 

421 Burlington 

422 Berlin 
427 Rahway 
431 Litchfield 
480 Carbondale 
443 Albuquerque 
447 Kenosha 

464 Cedar Rapids 
468 Albion 
477 Manitowoc 
188 Gloversville 

486 New Wesťsté* 

487 Baker 
407 Kankakee 
400 Trinidad 



DULL. 



25 Milwaukee 
36 Topeka 
40 Blddeford 
43 Urbana 
46 Springfield 
48 Toledo 
52 Elmlra 
64 Bvatisvllle 
66 Leavenworth 
71 Elgin 
74 Poughkeepsle 

76 Hannibal 

77 Minneapolis 
81SPeeksklll 
82 Meadvllle 
86 Mansfield 
02 Worcester 
08 Omaha 

102 Kansas City 
104 Pottsvllle 
106 Lock Haven 
112 Oneonta 
120 Muscatine 
129 N(Mrwlch 

126 Bphrata 

127 Mattoon 



120 Denver 
132 Brooklyn 
136 Hudson 
142 Lockport 
146 WlUIamsport 

146 N. Brunswick 

147 Union Hill 
157 Rockford 
168 LaFoyette 
162 Green Bay 
178 Zaneavllle 
175 Kingston 
178 Olney 

170 Bangor 
ie4Gayey 
105 Frankfort 
200 Galesburg 
208 Kalamasoo 
214 Bluffton 
220 New Orleans 
28dSedalia 
230 Lyons 
246 fialamanca 
240 Pindlay 
260 BellvlUe 
267 Lancaster 
260 Bloomlngton 
263 Adrian 
270 Ft. Dodge 
277 Oskaloosa 
280 Owego 

286 Wichita 

287 Marinette 
290 Janesville 
294 Duluth 

296 Scranton 
(296 Wilmington 

297 Canton 
301 Akron 
902 Tecumseh 
307 Reno 

310 Manistee 

311 Auburn 
315 St. Cloud 
322 Joplln 
326 Taunton 
830 Alpena 

340 Traverse City 
347 Fargo 
861 Mankato 
362 Brookville 
866 Honeadale 
360 Atchloon 

366 Ann Arbor 

367 Ogden 

371 Borre 

372 Marshfield 
881 Watertown 
384 St. Augustine 
393 Cadillac 

402 Quakertown 
404 Austin 
406 CrawfordsviUe 
400 Kewanee 
410 Centralla 
410 Salina 
424 Stratford 
(34 Faribault 
436 Kenton 
436 Olyphant 
444 Walla Walla 
462 PetoBkey 
466 Albla 
157 Benton Harbor 
468 Brainerd 
466 Easton 
476 Pontiac 
470 Wheeling 
482 Wausau 
48.'> Augusta 
4S8 Mlddletown 
480 lola 
400 Fairfield 
494 Fall River 
406 Marshalltown 



INTERNATIONAL FINES 

The International Executive Board approved 
the application of Union 441. Little Rock, Ark., 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOUBNAL 



to fln« B. Clark (SITOT) tSS.OO for worklnc In the 
non-union factory of Bloch, Msrsr A Co. and 

teachtng eirls lo make clgarB. Vote— Afflmia- 

App raved I ho ¡ 

. " JeTirerÍÍB'í^ 

and worklne In another factory during 






_.. ,._.-((lng In the daytime In the facto., 

running a factory home and wortilng evsDlnK' 
and Sundays. Vole— Affirmative, g; nc«atlva, 0. 

Approved the application of Union 13. New 
Haven, to Una a. Ö. William» (101595) t20M for 
working Bsalnat the IblereBlB of hiB fellow mem- 
bers In the shop of Kllfeather. Vote — Atflrma- 
live. S; negative, 0. 

Approved the application of Union 1. Baltť 
more, to flne Wm. Faber (3T3Tg) tSO.OO for icab- 
blng at the shop of J. F. Obrecht. Vote — AOIrm- 
ndve, g; negative, 0. 

Fine* of no ar Lsm. 

Union ITl, Macon. Oa.. lined R. H. Cowart 

(3015T) fG.OO for allowing himself to become aus- 

Unlon 22». Blaghamton. N, Y., fined Frank 
Humphrey (20166) tlO.OO for allowing hlmaelt to 

Union 411, Winnipeg, Imposed a tine of tS.OD 
on August Plerlng (Î13Î6Î) for leaving town 
without his card and Jumping hi* tioard bill Of 



LETTER BOX 

' Note.— Letter« reroalnlngk uncalled for at the 
odlce after being advertlied In the Journal for 
one luue, must be returned to carrier of Chicago 
DOS Comee, by order PoatofHue Department, 
Washington, D. C. 

Returned the following to PoaCotSce Depart- 
ment since the last Issue of Journal: E. D, liue- 

Unl'on 67, Champaign. 111.— For F. J. Daoier. 

Union 14, Chlcaso. 111.— For Bmest Bachs, 
Cdw. a uen there, Jas. Hart. Edw. Herit, Phi- 
lander Kempt, Clarenœ Larson. John Valentine, 



Our boys seero afraid ol m thou sand -dollar 
endowment. All kinds of hypotheses arq brought 
up Co show Its Impracticability. It was always 
thus. 

Alexander Von Humboldt said the United 
States would acquire U ex Ico and then go to 

Q^Lrment workers of Boston are on strike. 
They must win. 

In the thirteenth century the cathedral was 
the refugs of the people. The church Is our 
friend. 

Child labor must go. 

Compulsory arbitration Is coercion, and we 
are not slavea, but tree men. 

Despite all objections, I believe in the mini- 
mum wage. 

We don't go backward. 

Workers for Steel Trust ware beneDteä In 
conditions and wages through work of organ- 
isers for the A. F. o( L. 

Have you read Mr, Oompers' plea against 
Injunction and compulsory arbltrationf 

Ur. Standcumbe, president of the New ETng' 
¡and Conference, lias been through New Eng- 
land on a tour of Investigation and label agita- 
tion. 

A complete list of places sslling nonunion 
goods has been compiled by our label corn- 
Boston. Maas.. Feb. 7, 1313— Kindly publish in 
the Journal the following list of conCrlbuUons 
[o the appeal of Union 91, Boston, (or the bene- 
fit of Cha». Convaert: Î71, Barre, VC. «i ÎO«, 
North Adams, Mass.. Jl; 32B. Fond du I^c, Wis., 
H; 2T3, Bocktand, Me., tl; !31. Amsterdam. N. 



UNION NOTES 



o?'tße 'Í 



II by Union 97, Boston. 
with reference to free smokers'. 

e Senate and 1h now In the hands 

,. . lent. Secretary of Ihe Treasury 

favors the bill and it Is believed he will sign It. 
A number of Importers were before the ways 
and means committee of the House, advocating 
an Increase of Internai revenue tax on domestic 
cigars. The object la obvious, but some are of 
the opinion thai a larger factor Is behind them. 
.. _. _. _.... •-- -national president got on the 



Job and It will n 



e done 



made 






Build your union fli 
If the trade unlonli 
heve patience. 
Employers of labor 



smokers' bill. Credit Is 
' Its passage In United 

I are not consistent, we 



OIOAE MAKEBS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



tally blind and itanüjrBMl. — For tha Commltte«. 
Haiiun Raaach, SecretaiT' 

8acr«tary of tit, Trinidad, Colo^ would like 
to bear from Arthur Généraux (8I87S). 

Union 117, Pino Bluff, Ark., would llko to hear 
from J. P. JohDBon. Laat heard from In Hunt- 
Inaton, Ind. 

Any Mcretary hoIdlnR card of Z. M. Richard 
(114141) wlU pfeaaa collect $S,40 for eight dues 
which he owe* to Union 4B8, Everett. Wash. 

Union 87, Brooklyn, [ireaented Abram Moaa, 
their retiring president, with a very handsome 
aet of reaolutlona after fourteen years as pre- 
aldlng otncer. Ur. Mom haa been a very popu' 



Union 282. Brldseport. Conn., reauests the aec- 
retarles holding the cards of M. F, Burke (605IE) 



thea 



]ow8: Burke, 



lu sated 



pay up before the 



. „ jiitltutlon 

will be enforced. This la the last notice, and 
ftll other members Indebted to Union Í8S. Qe- 
nera, N. Y., are reque— ■ ' - "^ ' 

next laaue of the Joi: 
appear In the Journal. 

Tha aecretary of 40, Blddeford, Me., will r 
(raat loana during working hours. 

Wtll the aecretary holding the card of Buge 
td Ueair pleaae notify the secretary of 77, HI 
1. Clnn. 



regular meeting, March 3, they may get 

Into trouble. 

Membara owing private loans to Union HI, La 
Porte, Ind., please remit hy March 1. IUI, or 
names will be published In next Journal. 

Union Í2S, Taunton, Mass., would like to bear 
from C. S. O'Neil (14B7S) reference private kjan 
of 15.30, and from Pred Doxle (4C111) reference 

private loan of tSi-OO. 

Secretaries holding the cards of tha following 
named members please collect private loans 
opposite their names and forward to Union 119. 



■trvat, t ... .„ ,,.. 

_UDlon IBS, Port Smith, would like to hear from 
Cliaiies Bherer. 

If bam Thompson doesn't pay that board bill 
which he owes In Newport, R. I., by the next 
rcupilar meeting of Union 10, Providence, be 
wul be suspended. 

Retraction. — Union 10, Providence, says: "Ow- 
llw to further Investigation of accounts of Union 
10. Providence, the amounts that were charged 
-ňlnst a. W. Morrlss (1117S8) and Qeo. Lenox 



KSalnat our tonner secretary^. J. Bachmann. 

On November t, 1911, Herman Hemcath 
<Sti10) reported tbe loas of his card. No appli- 
cation for duplicata has been made. No per- 
cmtAge on loans paid. It he has since been 
working anywhere and paying dues the secretary 
la roaueated to notify the International office. 

John Hamilton rZOORI) still owes fG.OO Une and 
t».M board bill.— By Union 7, Utlca. 






_ , . .J hereby reguealed to 

. . munlcate with the flnanclBt secretary of 
Union SS, Ullwaukee. Important business. 

Financial secretary Union 1*8, Lincoln. Neb.. 
holds monev for: Charles Smith f18476), L. Lo- 
wltky (10Í7S9>. Claude O. Bbees (12S0). B. Can- 
ter mat»), Ray Coats (100ÍIS), Mnx Ooldenthal 
f7179i), J. A. RaV f9«847). H. J, Kplley (833101. 
■W. T. Linder t712B5). J. LArendahl (21843). J. R. 
.Tnsenh flOlSλ. W. LasrhenskI n07R47). Mever 
Shapiro (104D75). Hay have same by giving date 



SlouK City, bear from them before r 

a, " "' — ' 

Phir"Éîorneir (Y6EëB)~ClV KlnTâ^,. , 
Thompeon (10Í370), A. J. Holloran (109657), 
Chas. Bruner (1B41B), Ous Felber (9872S), R. W. 
Brown (20229), Fred Eaton (821B1), J. M. La 
Sears (33342), Ja«, Byron« (706Ï7). R. Karrow 
(77E97), Wm. Vaughn (108291), Prank Clifford 
(100407). Jos. Sbanley (91812), Otto Lorenie 
(111052), Jas. Norbutt (7527B). 

The following named are requested to remit 
private loans to Union 291, San Jose. Cal. (11.00 
unless otherwise noted) : O. J. Oles (9427R). 
Arthur Greater (102018). Dan Burns (76770). 
Logan Paul (699T5). John Watklns (97Bîfi). »2. 
C. P. Rutrigger (855S8), W. Schralhel (50994). 
John Klein (SSSS), Hosea Kent (102719). Chnii 
H. King (S321), Armand Millier ÍS8284), Remard 
Hogan (59313). Chas, Eastbev (SBflBl). 12.00 J. 

■LI" --;;;;- -^ Pollard (8S880), Phil Kemof (40391). ^hHs. 

hlra. This TTrban 471811), 12.00, Sam Thompson (7S489), 
13,711. John A. Rhelm (21301), Erwin Collins 
(9302), H. A. HaVB fÄOBlß), Frank Gonialex 
'1793) 12,1)0, W. H. Woythman. J. O. Caldwell, 



n and Jos, Schre 



whei 



Lnd number of u 



PRIVATE LOANS 

Members owing private loana to Union 94. 
Pawlucknt. are notified to pay or show cause 
why they should not pay or iie suspended. 

Union 94. Slaurertles, N. T.. would like to hear 
from John B. C!haap (3T989) or Sfttd union will 
take some action In remrda to private loan. 

All members owlnc Union 490, Fairfield, pri- 
vate loans pay up hefor» next meeting night or 
their namp« will he inihllshed In the Journal. 

NoHi-»— To all members who are indebted to 
nmon 20Î, Porlland. Orp . for private loans: This 
I'nion hfs decided to isoliert all Its oulBtandlng 
lOBns. This Is the first notice. 

Union 480. Oklahoma City. Okia, would like 
to hear from J. W. Oliver (82990) In regard to 
remitting for that private loan granted In 1908, 



IN MEMORI AM 

In reporting deaths kindly comply with the 
following and you win aave time and unneces- 
sary work; Olve full name, number, date and 
Place of initiation of member. Ha« member 
held redring card? If ao, did he pay hla dues? 



and. In nddllion, send in such CHrts, 1 
on vour letter the Information necessary, aa the 
taller Is flkd ns a matter of re™rd. Before 
nnylng death benefits study Sections UK and 
1^1, Inrtnplve,, Rnnd In a death blank property 
filled out for all death benefits paid. 

The fottowinc unions adopted resolutions of 
n-spnct and rnndolence relatlnir lo death o'- 
ilpflths as follows, and ordered charier draped 
In mnurnini for thirty da>ii: 

ITnlon 129. Tlenv-r— R. R. Smith (38239). nge 
Bfi, who died W'b. 1. Fiinpr-il In "hnren nf Rons 
nf Herman, Haurl nnri. f!, A. R. and Cigarmak. 
»rs. Interment at Riveralrte Cemetery. 

Union IS, New York, N T.— Moses De (^sta. 
a lifelong friend of ontontsm. who devoted hi« 
life to Its principles, a delegate to the Central 



30 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



Federated Union of New York, member of J. A. 
6. and the Label Board. 

Union 218, Bingham ton— Winifred Harmon, 
who died January 19. A floral tribute was sent 
by 'the union and a delegation from the union 
attended the funeral. m 

Union 81, Peeksklll, N. Y.—Carf Grimm (40468). 
who died Feb. 3. Committee attended funeral. 

Union 160, Mllford, Maas.— Napoleon Bonne- 
ville, who died Jan. 11. Burial took place in 
St. Johns, Quebec. Committee from Union 160 
accompanied the body as far as Boston. 

Union 26. Milwaukee, Wis.— John Luell (65070). 
who died Jan. 18. 



Swindler works New Orleans. Cuban, who 
says he is from New York, finds Southern 

city easy. 

New Orleans smokers are easy msxks in the 
opinion of A. Bermudez, a Cuban, alias lie 
Blanc. Bermudez is quallned to discuss the 
subject, for he has already sold 25,000 low grade 
cigars in that city at a high figure. He laughs 
at his victims and says ne will continue nis 
operations in the southern metropolis for a brief 
time. He has a city license to peddle cigars. 
Here Is the way he works: 

"My name Is Le Blanc," he announces with a 
brisk, businesslike air as he enters an office. 
"I have here Just two boxes, a- hundred each, of 
ñne Havana cigars, which I offer to you at six 
cents each. You see, I am a student at Tulane 
University. My father is a cigar manufacturer 
in Havana. Around Christmas time he sends 
me several thousand cigars which I sell at a 
slight profit." 

A glib explanation of the discrepancy in names 
on the boxes is always ready for the captious. 
Bermudez was finally brought to bay by a vic- 
tim. He offered to refund the victim's money 
if the latter would promise not to howl. He 
said the onlv charge on which he could be held 
was that of obtaining money under false pre- 
tenses; he had learned that much from his ex- 
perience in St. 'Louis. Bermudez says he was 
emoloyed for eight years by a big ejfport house 
in New York and resigned because he was re- 
fused a desired promotion. Then he started on 
a career of "dofng" people.— Exchange. 

The Western Economic Society conference on 
"Scientific Management" will be held at the 
Hotel Sherman, Chicago. March 14 a nd 15. 191S. 

REPORT OF INTERNATIONAL 
FINANCIER. 

Union 451, Bushneil, III. 

Only that ex- Secretary Al. Lewis was short 
In cash $36.41 and $3.00 for dues and assess- 
ments when he was taken away from here, the 
accounts would mot be in awful bad order. At 
the time of examination one of the family turned 
this $39.41 over to the union and we deposited 
It in bank. The present secretary also turned 
over to be deposited in bank $20.00. Total de- 
posited on Dec. 16, $59.41. At present the cash 
and stamp accounts are correct. $5.00 used for 
local purposes. The deficiency this date will be 
replaced this month. Statement as follows: 

Balance for May 1. 1910 $ 398.11 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1912 1,320.60 

Total $1,718.71 

Expense to Dec. 1, 1912 1,589.88 

Balance for Dec. 1, 1912 $ 128.83 

Receipts to Dec. 16, 1912 12.05 

Total $ 140.8!? 

Expense to Dec. 16, 1912 1.00 

Balance for Deo. 16, 1912 $ 139. SS 

Funds of TTnlon — 
Dec. K.. 1912, in 1st Nn.fl Bank.. .$121,73 
In posRe.gion Ser'y C. II. Anrlor.son 13.15 

Total 134.88 



Deficiency of union Dec. 16, 1912 $ 6.00 



The stamp shortage of ex-Secretary Lewis is 
entered in the receipts for December, 1912, and 
is accounted for, as Is also the cash, $36.41, in 
the amount In bank at this time. 

Union 456, Albla, Iowa. 

The books and accounts here are not In bad 
condition, even with a lot of foolish trouble that 
resulted In the suspension and final reinstate- 
ment, on appeal to the International President, 
by one of tne Jurisdiction members. Lack of 
promptness the trouble here. Corrected the 
amount claimed in bank and In possession of 
secretary, also stamps on hand. Benefit cards 
and vouchers for expense on file. All this will 
result In a better understanding of the consti- 
tution and the necessity of doing things -at the 
time. Enter receipts and expense at the time. 
You don't forget them then. Statement as fol- 
lows: 

Balance on hand Feb. l. 1910 $ 143.95 

Receipts to Dec. 1, 1912 699.00 

Expended over percentage in 1911 16.34 

Due to International Union on examina- 
tion 10.00 

Total $ 768.29 

Expense to Dec. 1. 1912 681.51 

Balance should be Dec. 1, 1912 $ 86.78 

Funds of Union- 
Dec. 1. 1912. in 1st Nat. Bank $30.00 

In possession Sec'y W. E. Bennett. 31.44 

Total 61.44 

Deficiency of union Dec. 1, 1912 $ 25.34 

Pine Bluff, Ark., Feb. 5, 1913. 
Since last report have examined the accounts 
of the following unions, viz.: 

Union 23, Springfield, Mo. 

When I verified the bank account $2.97 inter- 
est was entered in the bank book, which will 
appear in the January, 1913, receipts. I also 
entered in the January, 1913, expense $6.00 sick 
benefit paid in April, 1912, which had never been 
reported. There was also a surplus in due 
stamps. Other than this the accounts were in 
very nice condition. Statement as follows: 

Balance for Jan. 31, 1910, as per Finan- 
cier $ 321.43 

Expended over percentage year 1909 8.42 

Receipts to Jan. 1. 1913 1,676.02 

Total $2,005.87 

Expense to Jan. 1, 1913 1,727.20 

Balance for Jan. 1, 1913, should be $ 278.67 

Funds of Union — 
Jan. 1, 1913, in Union National 

Bank $198.10 

In possession Sec. C. O. Stahl 62.16 

Total 260.25 

Deficiency of union Jan. 1, 1913 $ 18.42 

There was $33.10 deposited in bank on Jan. 7, 
1913. 

Union 117, Pine Bluff, Ark. 

For a new charter the accounts here are in 
coed order. Explained to the secretary how to 
balance each member's dues account with every 
credit given, to show when member would be 
entitled to the 16 weeks' limit in dues, also when 
members were on non-beneflclarv list, "90-day 
limit," as per Sections 73 and 106, for non-pay- 
ment of dues or percentage on loans, etc. The 
socrelary liore Is interested in the work and will 
do the ripfht thlns- Statement as follows: 
Rerelpts from organization to Feb. 1, 

1913 $ 83.70 

Kxponso to Feb. 1. 191.3 $36.15 

iMie to Union 117 on examination. 6.20 

Total 42.35 

Balance for Feb. 1. 1913, would be....$ 41.83 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



31 



Fund« of Union — 
Feb. 1, 1913, in Simmons National 

Bank $45.00 

in possession Sec. Otto Pitts 2.66 

Total 47.55 

Cash surplus on hand Feb. 1, 1913 1 6.20 

Union 128, El Paso, Texas. 

The books and accounts of this local are in 
very nice condition. A real attempt to have 
them right is evident. Gave the secretary what 
help I could reference balancing each member's 
dues account with every credit given; how to 
show in the dues account when members are 
entitled to the 16 weeks' limit in dues; also when 
they are non- beneficiary; on the 90 -day limit, 
etc Statement as follows: 

Balance for Nov. 1, 1909 1 54.72 

Receipts to Jan. 29» 1913 1,966.55 

Expended over percentage in 1909-10-11 133.50 
Due to International Union on examina- 
tion 8.50 

Total • 12,153.27 

Expense to Jan. 29, 1913 1,694.27 

Balance for Jan. 29, 1913, would be I 469.00 

Funds of Union — 
Jan. 29, 1913, in City National Bank 288.26 

Deficiency of union Jan. 29, 1913 % l'fb.74 

This statement does not include any amount 
expended over percentage during year 1912. 

Union 189, Phoenix, Ariz. 

^.The books and accounts here have been han- 
dled honestly— strictly so. Cash and stamp ac- 
counts correct. All benefit cards and vouchers 
for expense on file. Ex-Secretary M. O. Fam- 
ham left for California the evening I arrived, so 
did not see him. He drew from the bank all the 
funds of the union and turned that and all 
stamps, etc., over to the new secretary, D. F. 
McGulgan, who will at once open up a new bank 
account. I gave the new secretary all the help 
I could reference balancing each member's dues 
account with every credit given, entering up all 
benefits, date of fiscal year, etc., on the mem- 
ber's ledger page, how to indicate in the dues 
account when members are entitled to the 16 
weeks' limit ot on the 90-day limit, etc. State- 
ment as follows:' 
Receipts from organization to Jan. 25. 

1W3 1150,10 

E:xpense from organization to Jan. 25, 

1W8 120.00 

Balance on hand would be Jan. 25. 1913.1 30.10 
Funds of Union — 
Jan. 25, In possession Sec'y D. F. Mc- 
Gulgan $ 30.10 

As stated above, this and what local money 
No. 189 had. was drawn from bank by ex -Sec'y 
M. G. Famham and turned over to Sec'y Mc- 
Gulgan, who will at once open up a new bank 
account. 

Union 262, Dallas, Texas. 

The books and accounts here are In fine con- 
dition. Cash and stamp accounts correct. 
Ledger indexed and correctly posted. Benefit 
cards and vouchers for expense nicely filed. Very 
correct. Statement as follows: 

Balance for Nov. l, 1909 1 147.68 

Receipts to Jan. 1, 1913 1,390.85 

Expended over percentage in 1909-10-11. 39.37 

Total $1,577.90 

Expense to Jan. 1, 1913 1,412.51 

Balance on hand should be Jan. 1, 

1913 $ 165.39 * 

Funds of Union — 
Jan. 1, 1913, In Guarantee State 

Bank & Trust Co 1150.00 

In possession Sec'y W. W. Bowen 15.39 

Total $ 166.89 

Union 286, Fort Worth, Tex. 

The books and accounts here are in very fair 
order. Benefit cards and voucher« for expense * 



all on file. Corrected the dues reported on hand. 
Cash account correct. Explained to Secretary 
Bloomberg how to balance the members' dues 
account in the ledger to correspond with due 
book with every credit given. Section 175 not 
complied with at present; must be in the future. 
.Statement as follows: 

Balance for Nov. 1, 1909 1 129.05 

Receipts to Jan. 1, 1913 1.957.45 

Total $2,086.60 

Expense to Jan. 1, 1913 1,943.45 

Balance for Jan. 1, 1913 $ 148.06 

Funds of Union — 

Jan. 1« 1913. in American National 
Banl $105.00 

In possession Sec'y Max Bloom- 
berg 88.05 

Total $ 143.03 

This balance for Jan. 1, 1913, does not include 

any amount expended over percentage during 

year 1912. 

Union 293, Fort Smith, Ark. 

The books and accounts here are really in 
good order. Corrected surplus in the stamp ac- 
count. Called their attention to Sections 73 and 
106. The^e are loans to be collected here, and 
at once. The new law regarding the collection 
of loans puts at rest the talk made by some of 
the members regarding this matter. Failure to 
pay percentage . on loans and penalty attached 
was called to their attention, particularly. State- 
ment as follows: 

Balance on hand for Dec. 81, 1911 $ 252.61 

Receipts for Feb. 1, 1918 466.07 

Expended over percentage in 1911 21.66 

Total $ 729.24 

Expense to Feb. 1, 1913 .623.47 

Balance for Feb. 1, 1913 $ 105.77 

Funds of Union— 
Feb. 3, 1913, in First Naťl Bank. ..$70.57 
In possession Sec'y Henry Wood... 15.11 

Total $ 85-68 

Deficiency of union Feb. 1. 1913 $ 20.09 

This deficiencmy, or the balance shown for 
Feb. 1, 1913, does not Include the amount ex- 
pended over percentage during year 1912. 

Union 822, Joplln, Mo. 

Secretary Patterson does as well as the mem- 
bers will let him. So many of them over the 
limit in. dues. Section 73 don't mean much to 
some of the members here now. but it will one 
of these days. All benefit cards and vouchers 
and original bills for expense on file. Ledger 
correctly posted and indexed. Corrected differ- 
ence in the stamp account. Statement as fol- 
lows: 

Balance for Jan. 31. 1910, as per Finan- 
cier $ 607.67 

Expended over percentage in year 1909.. 82.14 

Receipts to Jan. 1, 1913 1,590.85 

Due to International Union on examina- 
tion 2.50 

Total $2,233.16 

Expense vo Jan. 1. 1913 1,879.10 

Balance should be Jan. 1, 1913 $ 354.06 

Funds of Union — 

Jan. 1, 1913, in First Naťl Bank... $200. 00 

In possession Sec'y Chas. A. Pat- 
terson 12.80 ^ 

Total $ 212.80 

Deficiency of union Jan. 1, 1913 $ 141.26 

I remember that I neglected to verify the 
money In possession of Secretary Patterson. 

Union 346, San Antonio, Tex. 

In some respects the books and accounts here 
are In good order. The party that has made up 
the reports certainly intended to have them 
correct Did not know that the reported money 



32 



OIGAB MAEBBS* OFFICIAL JOUBNAL 



In bank wai not correct; however, it was made 
good at time of examination. There la not a 
member of Local 346 that haa i>aiâ duea in com- 
pliance with the conatitution. The wife of the 
aecretary ia the real buatneaa end of thia local, 
and with the underatandinff ahe now haa of how 
to do the work, how to apply the law in the pay- 
ment of beneflta. etc., there will be a different 
atory to tell, at leaat aa long aa ahe haa any- 
thincT to do with the accounta. $86.66 waa de- 
poaited in bank at time of examination, leav- 
Ing in poaaeaaion of aecretary IS.60 on account 
of January, 1918, buaineaa. Statement aa fol- 
Iowa: 

Balance for Nov. 1. 1909 1 138.82 

Receipta to Jan. 1, 1913 1,122.90 

Expended over percentage in 1909-10-11. 40.89 
Due International Union on examination BO.OO 

Total '. n.851.61 

Elxpenae to Jan. 1, 1918 1,064.28 

Balance would be Jan. 1, 1918 $ 287.88 

Funda of Union — 
Jan. 1, 1918, in Lock wood National 

Bank ¿a».$ .79 

Tn poaaeaaion 9ec'y C. M. Gkibbart. 86.66 

Total 87.84 

Deficiency of union Jan. 1, 1918 1 199.99 

Thia atatement doea not include any amount 
expended over percentage during year 1912. 

Union 364, Nacogdochea, Texaa. 

With the exception of not following Section 
176. the accounta here are in excellent condition. 
Statement aa followa: 

Balance for Dec. 81, 1908 1 196.94 

Receipta to Feb. 1, 1918 1,891.65 

Over percentage for 1909 .07 

Total $1,688.66 

Bxpenae to Feb. 1, 1913 1,818.47 

Balance would be Feb. 1, 1913 $ 276.19 

Funda of Union — 
Feb. 1, 1913, in Commercial Naťl 

Bank $249.09 

In posaeaslon Sec' y H. F. Wilaon 26.10 

Total $ 276.19 

Union 869, Sherman, Texaa. 

Since W. H. Ingram retired aa aecretary of 
thia local few. If any, attempta have been made 
to have benefit carda and vouchera for expenae 
on file. Part of the time the day book doea not 
ahow who bought duea, etc., aimply entered in 
a lump aum. Liedger waa a little better. On 
Jan. 14, 1913, when I examined the accounta, I 
turned booka and union property over to W. C. 
Claas, ao he could act aa aecretary until auch 
time aa permanent offlcera could be elected, 
truateea, etc. When Q. M. Contepaa (2884) re- 
tired from ofllce he failed to account for $186.61 
tn caah. B. C. Sevier took the ahop Contepaa 
had run and became aecretarVf for which he as- 
sumed reaponaibility to the International Union 
for thia $136.61 due from Contepaa. Since Mr. 
Sevier haa been aecretary he haa failed to ac- 
count for $83.05 in caah. Total due from Sevier, 
$218.66. Ex-Secretary Sevier alao covered up by 
reporting $69.06 in bank when there waa only 
$14.05. Statement aa followa: 

Balance for Nov. 1, 1909 $ 182.56 

Receipts to Jan. 1. 1918 847.20 

Union expended over percentage in 1909 

and 1910 1.29 

Due to International Union on examina- 
tion • 9.00 

Total $ 540.05 

Expense to Jan. 1. 1913 297.06 

Balance should be on Jan. 1, 1913 $ 243.00 

Funds of Union — 
Jan. 1, 1913. in Merchants' and Planters 
National Bank 14.05 



Deflciency of union Jan. 1, 1913 $ 228.95 

On Jan. 17, 1913, there was d^oalted in 



the baBk to tha credit of Union 869, 
Sherman 218.66 

Which paid the amount due from ex- 
Sec'y Sevier and leavea other union 
deficiency $ 10.29 

Union 404, Auatin, Texaa. 

Only that Section 176 haa been neglected the 
booka and accounta here are in very nice condi- 
tion. Ledger indexed and correctly poated. All 
benefit carda and original biUa and vouchera for 
expenae on file. Very nice, indeed. An honeat 
effort haa been made to have thinga ri^L Cor- 
rected amall aurplua hi the atamp account. 
Statement aa follower 

Balance for Nov. l, 1911 $ 146.66 

Receipta to Jan. 1. 1918 1,127.79 

Expended over percentage in 1911 16.04 

Due to International Union on examlna- 
Uon 10.00 

Total ...$1.298.49 

Bxpenae to Jan. 1, 1918 1.144.14 

Balance on hand ahould be Jan. 1, 

1918 $ 164.85 

Funda of Union- 
Jan. 1, 1918, in American National 

Banik $ 29.76 

In poaaeaaion Sec-Treaa, Joa. 
Amatead 114.66 

Total 144.81 

Deficiency of union Jan. 1, 1918 $ 10.04 

Accounted for aa followa: Due International 
Union on examination, $10.00 illegal aick benefit 
and 4 cen ta not yet refunded on amount expend- 
ed over percentage in year 1911. Sec.-Treaa. 
Amatead nad depoaited in bank $100.00, leavin«: 
In hla poaaeaaion at time of examination, includ- 
ing receipts to date, $18.76. 

Union 441, Little Rock, Ark. 

Had there been vouchera for aalariea. etc, the 
accounta here would have been in excellent con- 
dition— otherwiae very accurate. Caah and 
atamp accounta correct and ledflrer poated to 
date. Statement aa followa: 

Balance for Dec.' 81, 1911 $ 182.66 

Receipta to Feb. 1. 1918 828.90 

Total $ 461.46 

E2xpenae to Feb. 1, 1913 297.67 

Balance for Feb. 1. 1918 $ 168.89 

Funda of Union — 
Feb. 1, 1918, in American Bank... $180.00 
m poaaeaaion Sec'y F. Fredriokaon 81.44 

ToUl 161.44 

Deficiency of union Feb. 1, 1918 $ 8.46 

Thia deficiency doea not include any amount 
expended over percentage during year 1918. 

Union 460, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Affaira are fine here, except that a few of the 
membera inaiat upon being over the limit in 
duea. Their attention waa especially called to 
Sectiona 78 and 106. All benefit carda and 
vouchers for expense on file — very nice. Ledger 
haa been correctly posted. I neglected to verify 
the money In poaaeaaion of Sec'y-pro tem. Krie- 
ger. Statement as follows: 

Balance on hand April 1, 1910 $ 807.95 

Receipts to Jan. 1, 1913 1,362.20 

Total $1,660.15 

Expense to Jan. 1, 1913 1,490.10 

Balance should bo Jan. 1, 1913 8 170.06 

Funds of Union — 
Jan. 1. 1913. in State Exchange 

Bank $145.60 

In possession Sec'y-pro tern. Wm. 

eT Krieger 24.4& 

Total $ 170.06 

Yours fraternally, 

W. A. CAMPBBI^ 
International Financiar, 



CIGAB MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOtJÄNAL 



33 



•S 



LIST OF SECRETARIES 

The first name is that of the Corresponding and the second that of the Financial Secretafy. 

Secretaries marked thus: 

• Will NOT grant loans during working hours, 
t Have regular headquarters. 
§ Are, cigar packers. 

Note — Changes in secretaries or addresses should be reported at once, and all changes should 
reach this office not later than the 10th OP EACH MONTH TO INSURE PUBLICATION 
in the current issue. 



ATJJBâlfA. 

219 Albert Laland, 008 Selma at. Mobile. 

Fred Hawkins, 117 Flsber alley, Mobile. 
•406 And7 Marx, 1720H let ave.. Box 618. Birminfliani. 
•433 Cbaa. Peteraoo, 800 So. Scott at.. Mobile. 

AEZZONA. 
189 M. O. ramliam, 121 N. lat av., Pboenlx. 



117 Otto Pitts, 618H B. 6d STe., Pine Bluff. 
IBS B. Wood, 818 Garrison are.. Fort Smith. 
441 F. FredericksoD. 1215 K. 13th at., Uttle Rock. 

CALXFORVXA. 

•225 W. O. Fenn. Boom 103, Labor Temple, Lop Angeles 
1228 Chas. Drábek, 1886 Mission st., San Francisco. 
Henrj Ibanes, 1886 Misiion it.. San Francisco. 

238 Abe SilTerstooe, Box 7, Sacramento. 
t2S3 F. L. Wiler, 800 Albany Blk., Oakland. 

291 F. J. Hepp, Box 1, Labor Temple, San Jose. 

332 Thos. Stelcerwald, 067 4th st.. San Diego. 

8S8 ChSB. Stebbins. Box 264, Bnreka. 

409 Jacob Zimmer, Box 472, Bakersfleld. 

CAVABA. 

tTt Johs PamphlloD, Boom 106, 88 Gboreb st., Toronto, 
Ont. 

•55 F. HoDgh. 170 Dake st.. Hamilton, Ont. 

t58 A. Oariepy, 238 ATe. Hotel de Ville. Montreal. 

•69 F. Mather, 75 Greenwich st., Brantford. Ont. 

140 Leo T. Coyle. 138 Chnrch at.. St. Catherines, Ont. 
*211 J. Lb Smith. 2616 Rose st.. Victoria. B. C. 

278 J. McKenxie, 110 Dundas st., London. Ont. 

349 0. H. Stevens. Jr.. Moore st.. St John, N. B. 

367 Robt. J. Crsig. care Kurts A Co.. Vancouver. 
•378 J. C. Gosselin. 59 Marquette st., Sherbrooke, Que. 

8T8 Wm. H. Boreskle. 1046 4th it.. Brandon. Man. 

411 Jas. Grantham, Box 60, BrockTille. Ont. 

414 Loa A. Biffue, 04 OranTille st., Winnipeg. 
•420 Fred Roberti, 4 Balfour st.. Box 154. St. Tbomas, 
Ont. 

422 S. Welheaser. Troj «t.. Berlin, Ont 
•4M James Hagarty. 170 St. David st.. Stratford, Ont 
•432 H. S. Pike. Box 793. Nelson, B. C. 

459 W. B. Rose, Saskatoon Cigar {Victory. Saskatoon, 
Sas¿. 

461 F. H. Braee, Box 912, Edmonton, Alta. 

465 M. Walsh, 1 St. James st., Quebec. 

473 E. J. Wendlsnd, care of Calgary Cigar Co.. Cal- 
gary. Alta. 

486 Herman Knudsen. Box 613, New Westminster, 
B. C. 

COLORADO. 

tl29 J. W. Sanford, 201 Railroad bldg., Deorer. 

164 8. H. Manning, 140 N. College ave.. Ft. GoIUns. 
•306 J. J. LIsterman. 628 B. 8d St., Pnebkl. 

49S H. 0. Sewell, 1680 Manitou ave., Box 862. Colo- 
rado Springs. 

499 James Dsly. Box 374. Trinidad. 

conEonoüT. 

*26 Wm. F. Kom, 2 Burrltt ave.. 8. Norwalk. 

139 F. A. Ombe, 28 Church st. Box 979. New Hawn. 

•42 Ell Bnmell. 7 Central Row. Room 5. 2d floor. Box 

840. Bartford. 
108 J. Zeigler. 18 Clifton ave.. Ansonia. 
139 Chas. G. Peet Box 19, Long HIIL 



156 
•180 
•282 
•290 

•321 

396 
•308 
•4<I7 

•484 



J. L. Barnett. Box 32. Suffleld. 

John H. Riley, 18 James at. Danbury. 

Geo. Engelhard, 80 Edwin st., Bridgeport. 

Chas. Anderaon. Box 737, 166 Grand at. Middle- 

town. 
F. A. Goddard. 296 Main st. Box 609, New 

Britain. 
Val. Hahn, 27 Irion st.. P. O. Box 560. Waterbury. 
John Bohl. 413 Main St., Stamford. 
R. A. Krohn, I Tyler ave., Norwich. 
F. Despin, 261 Broad st. Meriden. 



CUBA. 
151 Joie R. Melon. Aramburn 28, Habana. 

DELAWARE. 
296 Chas. M. Herdman. 1026 Lovering av.. Wllmluffton. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

110 Ralph Allnutb, 910 E. Capitol st., Washington. 
• W. Whitehead, 720 -Otb st., 8. £.. WasUlni;toii. 

FLORIDA. 

29 A. T. Gibbs, 810 Cedar st., Jacksonville. 
170 Peter Baker, Box 460, West Palm Beach. 
248 A. R. Crus. 824 Albert St., Jacksonville. 
289 B. F. Corey. 612 Deleon ave., Miami. 

Wilson Pfnder, 606 Ponceanna ave.. Miami. 
t*336 Fred Cruttenden. Box 434, Tbor City (Tampa). 
337 Wallace Pinder. 301 Ells. st.. Key West. 
354 A. Molejón. Key West 

Fernando Chili, 728 United st.. Key West. 
356 Miles P. Hnnter. Box 176. Psiatka. 
374 Rogelio Mlqnell, Box 50. Key West. 
•384 Herman Manney. Box 686, St. Augustine. 

Lawrence Pomar. Drawer 14, St. Augustine. 
392 W. S. Tsylor, Box 94, Lakeland. 
462 R. Torres. Francis and Main sts.. Box 1.%. W. 

Tampa. 
464 Stephen Zaragosa, Box 833. Pensscols. 

L. A. Parody, Box 877, Pensacola. 
480 Claud Compbell. 34 W. Church st.. Orlando. 
600 Jose Santo del Rio. Box 102 (Ybor City). Tampa. 

Louis Ortega, P. 0. Box 102 (Tbor City) Tamita. 

GEORGIA. 

344 Andrew L. Lee. 40 Bartow st.. Atlanta. 
390 T. H . Wilcox. Box 106, Valdosta. 
471 W. B. Surles. Box 216, Americas (Macon), 
478 R. R. Cone. 836 Broad st.. La Grange. 
486 Wm. Fix. care Wolfe A Lombard, 936 Broad st., 
Augusta. 

IDAHO. 

266 Geo. 8. Anderson, Box 596. Boise. , ' 

380 John L. O'Meara. care Wallace Cigar Co.. Wallace. 



Î 



iLuorois. 

14 N. F. Lents. 211 W. Madison st. 2d fl.. Chicago, 

15 Auguat Geissler, S. B. cor. Rsndolph and Msrket 
sts., 2d floor, CStieago. 

•20 C%a8. Wright 320 N. Wster st., Decatur. 
•88 H. Bogaake. 1120 S. 8th st. Springfield. 
41 M. Rausch. 490 N. Lincoln ave.. Aurora. 
•Wm. Schlicht. 173 Hlnman st.. Aurors. 
47 Charles L. Aldag, 1624 Spruce st.. Quincy. 

•Ph. Cornelius, MS Jersey st., Quincy. 
•57 Jno. Dempsey, 501 E. Green st., ürbsns. (Cham- 
paign). 



\ 



34 



CIGAR MAKERS^ OFFICIAT. JOURNAL 



'73 

•80 

99 

loi 

*114 
•118 
•127 

154 
•157 
•174 

178 
•183 

191 
•200 

201 

207 

217 

222 
Î227 

243 
•247 
•250 

258 
•259 
•274 
•297 
•305 

310 

ses 

383 
389 
394 

•409 
410 
423 
431 

•437 

438 

•451 

456 

476 

497 



Bloomlngton. 
Pekín. 
A. Canton. 



81 
33 

37 

50 

•54 



•62 

134 

158 

159 

197 

204 

•214 

•215 

•221 

•235 

2a7 

•300 

308 

•335 

339 

352 

•379 

•382 

3i)9 

40« 

•415 



•C) 

•72 

•88 

•111 

•120 

150 

155 

•172 

•177 

•181 

223 

239 

•270 

277 

328 



F. W. Seybold. 21 Dooglas ave.. Elgin. 
A. A. Ptttie. 728 Clement pi.. Alton. 

A. C. Zimmerman, 831 Jobuatoo al., Dunville. 
Harry Werner. 618 B. superior at.. Ottawa. 
•Phil Selffert. 419 Leland at., Ottawa. 
Herman Kotx. Spring Valley. 

Chaa. Dorf, Spring Valley. 

L. P. Hoffman. 535 Reid at.. JackaonvlUe. 

W. U. Oaaf. 716 Merrlman st., Peoria. 

Bert Craddlck, 1717 Broadway, Muttoon. 

Geo. Auer, 103 6tb at., Lincoln. 

U. McGurk. 224 Longwood st.. Roc'kford. 

Bari Harper. 008 Marble at.. Joliet. 

Wm. Wetzian. Box 144. Olney. 

J. W. Spits. 6tb ave.. Mendota. 

Otto Ladwig, 408 Liberty at.. Box 192. Morrla. 

Oua C. Raosch, 285 E. Slmmona st.. Galeabur?. 

H. J. Holabrink. 831 4tb ave.. Rock laland. 

W. E. Tronte. Box 202. 228 Adama at.. Carthage. 

Benjamin Cohen. 3110 92d at.. South Chicago. 

Bd. Zacher. 1516 2d at.. Pern. 

Nie. Medlnger. 2931 N. Halated at.. Chicago. 

Ang. Schacht, 1710 Oak at., Chicago Heighta. 

Frank Seidel. 624 B. York at.. Blue laland. 

Henry WUhelm. 13 N. Airy at.. BelleTiUe. 

P. C. Haley. 102 E. Main at., Streator. 

W. J. UTinga. 207 W. Mill at. " 

G. B. RicketU. 409 Court at.. 
W. H. Harrison. 436 N. Ave. 
F. A. Peterson. 1315 S. 6th at.. Monmouth. 
H. F. Fitta, 186 N. Geneaee at. (upataira). Wan* 

kegan. 
T. B. Driako. Havana. 

Francisco Navaa, 30 N. Hoyne av., Chicago. 
R. C. Rives. 226% W. Court st., Paris. 
Arthur McHatton, Maple at.. Sycamore. 
Chria. Ennia. 227 W. 3d st.. Kewanee. 
Ammie Schults. 110 N. Locuat at.. Centralia. 
J. E. Harmon. 117 B. 3d at.. Sterling. 
Chancy Berry. Box 45. Litchfield. 
James Clbo, Woablngton av., Cairo. 
Chaa. Hlggina. 208 6th st., Cairo. 

B. H. Oehrlng. 506 S. Mechanic at.. Marlon. 
F. E. Mann, Box 87. Bnahnell. 

Joe Dorak, care John Weber's Cigar Factory, 

Galena. 
Walter Emery. 218 Timber at., Pontiac. 
Chaa. Baler, 078 So. Schnyler av., Kankakee. 

Z]n)ZAKA. 

A. Iieiatcr. 106 V^ W. Court at.. Conners ville. 

Chaa. Gartlein. 1707 Vermont st.. Connersville. 

Geo. Ricker, 626 B. New York at.. Indianapolis. 

Wllliard Hall. 2119 N. Rural at.. Indlanapolia. 

L. P. Sanders, 1111 Elmwood av.. Ft. Wayne. 

John Dally. 1222 Poplar st., Terre Haute. 

•Philip K. Reinbold, 659 Cheatnut st.. Terr» 
Haute. 

W. Louis Miller, 225 Huston av., Evanaville. * 

Ernst A. Schellhase, 1613 E. Columbia st., Evans- 
Till«. 

Otto Beissman. 907 Main at., Richmond. 

Jos. Gaekle, 716 Indiana av.. La Porte. 

H. B. Miller. 909 Main at., LaFayette. 

Bert Williama. 439 N. Boots st.. Marlon. 

E. S. Moore, 424 S. Columbus st., Warsaw. 

Louia Husaon. 401 B. Main at.. New Albany. 

E. A. Glass, 816 W. Cherry at., Bluffton. 

C P. Horn. 88 S. Sherman at.. Logansport. 

John La Point. 216 N. St. Louis st.. South Bond. 

Ed. Bender, 20 E. 1st st., Peru. 

Harry J. Cappela. 754 B. Market at.. Huntington. 

C. B. Wakeûeld. 121 Franklin st.. Michigan Cltj. 
J. E. Schaubhut. 1111 B. Washington at., Muncle. 
Aug. Ebert. 745 Sohl St., Hammond. 

C. G. Bennett. 610 So. Main at., Kokomo. 

Thoa. Felts. Brookvllie. 

Chas. Sholder. Rochester. 

Omer Collier, 409 Sexton st.. Box 4. Rush ville. 

Julius Yunghana. 1102 Shelbv st.. 

Wm. Wood worth. 215 N. Oak at.. 

John McGregor. 123 E. Marion at. 

IOWA. 

J. J. Duggan, 1003 Bank st.. Keokuk. 

Ilcnry Wegener. 324 S. Garfield ave.. Burlington. 

Ed. Schrempf, 371 Bluff st.. Dubuque. 

Harry C. Ahrold. T04 E. 9th at. Dea Moines. 

Jno C. Nletzel. 609 Linn st.. Muscatine. 

P. J. Ryan. 609 Perry at.. Sioux City. 

Henry Bickenboch. Mt. Pleaaant. 

Emll Joens, 1125 W. 18th st.. Davenport. 

P H Heuermann. 412 N. 22d at.. Council Bluffa. 

Geo Rieffenach, 1116 Second st.. Fort Madison. 

O. T. Loach. 226 N. Davia at., Ottumwa. 

Ed. Kamer. 1012 S. 7th st.. Box 683, Lyona. 

Neil Murphy. Hower blk.. Ft. Dodge. 

T W. Ware, 710 A ave.. B.. Oaknloosa. 

l! C Wareham. 121 Adams at.. Crestón. 



Vincennos. 
Crawfordsvlllo. 
, Elkhart. 



•454 Robt. Drevikoaky. 1309 S. 2d st.. Cedar Rapids. 
450 W. E. Bennett. Porter Bros. Cigar Co., Albia. 
•400 E. E. Greenfield. E. Adama st.. Fairfield. 

495 T. Buchwald. 105 E. Main at.. Marshalitown. 

496 Ed M. Tynan. 444 Chorry at., Waterloo. 



KANSAS. 

36 D. A. Creamer, 732 Kansas av., Topeka. 
•56 Goo. Copeuhttver. 741 Kiokapoo St., Leavenworth. 
163 Chas. A. Bohne. Marytrville. 

286 II. W. Noltemeytr. 1110 S. Wichita st.. Wichita. 
345 C. G. Warrington. 907 N. Uth st.. Kansas City. 
:V>9 L. Waldauer. 719 Commercial at., Atchiaon. 
419 Amoa Barth. 136 llth st.. Salina. 
489 R. H. Buahgena. 13 W. Madison at.. lola. 



KENTUCKY.» 

t32 John Glmbel, 510 W. Green at., Lonlsvllle. 
•105 M. F. Kehoe, 504 W. 2d st.. MaysvlUe. 

186 C. O. Young. 1116 Jackaon at., Paducah. 

187 Joa. Samer. 902 Weatern ave., Covington. 



LOUISIANA. 

53 Miaa Katie Sheeby, 716 3d st., New Orleans. 
t220 S. L. Armstrong, 1642 N. Claiborne st.. New 
Orleana. 
•Geo. Toledano. 2014 Bourbon st., New Orleana. 



40 P. L. Dclonne. 131 Foaa st., Biddeford. 
•66 C. O. Beals. Box 183. Auburn (Lewiston). 
179 Thos. A. McCann. Box 125, 34 Sauf ord st.. Bangor. 
273 Wm. J. Healy. 26 Park at., Rockland. 
470 C. E. Downs. 51 Temple st., Portland. 



XABTLAND. 

tl Guatav Mechan, 6 S. Paca at.. Baltimore. 



MASSACHXrSETTS. 

21 Edgar Crannell, 165 E. Main ai., Marlboro. 
•28 S. J. T. Walls. 112 Elm st., C. L. D. Hall. Box 

102. Westfleld. 
49 Wm. J. Murphy, 19 Sanford at.. Springfield. 

•Paul H. Sheehan. 46 Hawthorne st.. Springfield. 
•51 Albert Archambault. 7 Spring st., Holyoko. 
Chas. O. Bemier. 84 B Lyman at., Holyoke. 
•66 W. P. Sterner. 91 Willow at.. Lynn. 
•92 Geo. Apholt. 419 Main at.. Box 339. Worcester. 
t97 Henry Abrahams, 11 Appleton st., Boston. 
Wm. F. Kinder. 11 Appleton st.. Boston. 
•160 W. Wall, Box 162. Rockwood Ct.. Mllford. 
206 E. R. Stein. Box 366, North Adama. 
226 E. A. Manning, 50 Merrimack st.. Haverhill. 
•255 Thos. F. Qarvey, 72 Ully ave., Lowell. 
324 Louis Urquhart, 14 Short at.. Gloucester. 
C. D. Saunders, 14 Short st., Gloucester. 
326 Daniel J. Kervlck. 54 Weir at., Taunton. 
396 P. Benjamin. Lock Box 34. Nortbami>ton. 
475 John J. Sweeney. 160 Water at.. Fitohburg. 
494 Geo. B. Pollard. 105 Locuat at.. Fall River. 



19 
t22 

24 
♦46 

67 

69 

•130 
•167 
•160 
•184 
186 
•206 
t208 

209 
•263 
•268 
•272 

302 

310 
•314 
•:t30 

340 

•3«8 
.393 

•307 
403 



KICHIOAN. 

Fred DePlanty. 663 Court st.. Sanit Ste. Marie. 

Fred Wolf, 200 Rüssel st., Detroit. 

Menno De Witt. 51 Allen st., Muskegon. 

U. Roealy, 1420 Alpine ave.. Grand Rapids. 

Clarence Over. 118 Waahington at.. Grand Haven. 

Chaa. T. Mallo. Jr.. 119 Hoffman st.. Three Riv- 
ers. 

A. Zuehlke. 222 S. 5th at., Saginaw. 

Wesley Rood. 418 Elizabeth at., Owosso. 

Wm. F. Geyer, 203 B st.. S., Cheboygan. 

A. W. Lefler. 110 W. Thomaa at.. Sta. À. Bay City. 

T. J. Broderick, 214 Armstrong st., Flint. 

Louis Prince. 30 Coldwater at.. Battle C^reok. 

H. J. Stohrer, 1206 S. Burdlck st.. Trades nud La- 
bor Hall. Kalamazoo. 

F. Sitter. 34 Smith st.. Coldwator. 

John G. Terhille, 10 Tocumsoh st.. Adrian. 

Walter Lippold. 406 So. Oak st.. Escanabu. 

N. J. Moera. 229 N. Larch st., Lansing. 

A. G. Holdenroich. Box 408. Tocumseh. 

A. R. Pierce. 453 2d st.. Manistee. 

Frank Barthel, 324 N. Grtunell st.. Jackson. 

A. Rosenfleld. 412 State st., Alpena. 

Neil Krauts, 438 W. 10th st.. Traverse City. 

Loo. J. Martin. 327 8. 4th ave., Ann Arbor. 

Adam Lesmer. 1108 Miller st.. Port. Huron 

J. M. Nagel. 302 Howard st.. Cadillac 

Clark Adamy, core B. & S.. Ionia 

Henry Phillips. 816 N. Flrat at.. IshpiMnin^ 



«« 



CIGAK MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



•íaa c. il. siuiej," 33 Cb 
Me A. W. iCunp. IIS V 



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•Î33 fljde M. Brown. Ilo B. M it., Sedalli. 
itWl Sirn Baldirln. eia dmlniil ■!.. Ht. Louis. 

3ZÏ Cboi. A. I'altfnon. Ill K. 8tli at.. Jupllu. 

353 Fred QcrTlc, lUS S. Uain at,. Loulalana. 

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^lOW Jobo GlFDDaD. lU Uorrla 11.. Ogdenaburi. 

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121 Wm. J.' C. Wlimar. 21B S, PIiId il-, liban. 

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21s John F. Watdell, 11« Pearne H., Blnihiniton. 
IISS C. B. BTïnlt. HT FÎnnt II.. Blnskmiilun. 

231 Vm. Kelly, Jr.. 1 Elk at.. Amalerdim. 
9241 Daniel 11. Brown. 1«6 Border ■!., Syrimae, 

«.M C, I.. Llndlan. IRSl la are,, 1 
*2«S H. 3, LIndUï, TB PlM at.. V 

2TS Frederick YatM, 34 Bobina 
bnrcb. 

2§0 E. m: Reynolds, ÏTO North aie., Owego. 

r"BÎgbï!"i»"che«tDiit ai.. Aoburq. 
. Pblllii. 2' Clark 'st.. Saniosa. 

1 rille at,. ÓonilDi. 

•428 Warna Tmjlor. Zîd and Plne'ir».. Niagara I 
•430 Peler Moooey, 1B2 W. l»t st.. Fallon, 

483 Cbaunoy Thajer. 31 Poreat M., Glorrrarllle. 

483 W. J. Ueae, 132 Proaiiect ave., Ulddlelown, I 



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327 J. E',"B™ 



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•Mai äfbnencke. Ill Park «Te,. Hob<*6n. 
1 Tb». K. Bartlej, ISS Bteftaaa it.. Itmr Clt7- 

5 Heorr P. Hilfen. 88 S. Orange aie,. Newark. 

6 Ido. J. Keller. 42 Baldwin nC. New Brunswick. 

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234 R, Nenhert, 



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36 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



OKLAHOMA. 
450 Day Wasbbarn. 13 National bldg.. Oklahoma City. 



OR£OON. 

*202 E. J. Stack, 270% Alder it., Portland. 
425 J. A. D'Ella. 474 Commercial at., Astoria. 
487 J. P. Penrod. Box 164, Baker. 



PEinrBTLVAVIA. 

63 Jas. F. Foley. 1S2 N. Center at.. Corry. 

64 Frank L. Flocken, R. F. D. 2, Box 15. Lebanon. 
82 Wm. Schnlts. Box 137. Penn at., MeadvUle. 

•01 Samnel A. Knauaa. 164 Court at., Allentown. 
•104 S. M. F. Glover. 606 Sanderson at. Pottsvllle. 
•107 Ed. MaUehner, 2628 Cochran st., Erle. 
•108 Lewis Young. 625 E. Bald Eagle at.. Lock Haven. 
•122 B. J. Trlbout, 20 Eddy at., warren. 
126 C. M. Hammond. 223 Washington av.. Ephrata. 

F. B. Emig. 148' Waahlugton ave.. Ephrata. 
145 W. Hoebener. 446 Wyoming st., WUllamaport. 
161 Chaa. McNamee, Lock Box 13. Denver. 
*Jubn A. Mowrey. L. B. 26, Denver. 
tl66 M. C. Kreck. 232 N. 9th st.. Philadelphia. 

(jeo. H. Ullrich. 232 N. 0th at.. Philadelphia. 
•171 Albert Home, Box 144. E. Greenville. 
*2X2 John H. Nase, 303 Waahington ave.. Sellera ville. 
236 Geo. Levy, 317 Conrt at., Reading. 

lA. P. Bower. Ill N. 6th st., Reading. 
242 Chaa. B. Robler. 17 Slgabee ave.. York. 
John B. Anmen. 717 Jeaaop pL. York. * 
244 A. E. Cook, 1021 N. 8d at., Harrlsburg, 
257 8. B. Dnke, 324 W. Walnut st., Lancaster. 

*J. P. Keenen. 431 High st., Lancaster. 
267 Irvin D. Endy, B. D. No. 2, Green Lane (Sum- 

neytown). 
288 C. S. G. wltmycr. Manhelm. 

*Cha8. F. Fisher. Manhelm. 
2D5 E. G. Kotxwlnkle. 410 Birch st.. Scranton. 

* Daniel Harris. 12 Stoort av.. Scranton. 
301 Zack E. Klllian. Box 112. Alerón. 
Don Smith. Lock Box 21, Akron. 
*303 Edgar Sty er, 129 7th at.. Perkasle. 
300 Wllaon Enck. Box 108. Roths ville. 

J. A. Sbaar. Rothaville. 
1.116 Francis X. Colgiin. Box 20. McSherrytovm. 
*:U7 Frank Hochberg. 155 Blackman st.. Wllkes-Barre. 
•.120 Earl Ootchlus. 123 Herrlck st.. Athena. 
35.*^ Wm. Klnslnger. 847 Main st.. Honesdale. 
402 Walter Oensder, Box 82. Richland center (Quaker- 
town) . 
*Chaa. Moyer, Box 82, Richland Center (Quaker- 
town). 
436 FYank Kelly, Delaware at., Olyphant. 
•439 W. T. Held. 66 Pearl at.. Carboodale. 
•446 Sam C. Miller. 217 E. Onk st., Norriatown. 
•400 H. Ellenbcrger, general delivery. Bastón. 



PUEBTO EICO. 

119 Clises de Jeaus, San Juan. 

Eiiteban Colon. San Augustin No. 101. Pta de 
Tierra San Juan. 
148 P. Vega Santoa, Box 208. Federación Libre. Taguas. 

A. Ferrer Collazo, Federación Libre, Box 298, 
Caguaa. 
100 Fernando Marcano. Box .17. Gurabo. 

Pedro Montanec. Calle de la Flores. Gurabo. 
104 Marcelo Mendoza. P. O. Box 8. Cayey. 

Bernardo Vega. Box 8. Cayey. 
aXi Rafael R. Ramirez, Box 58. Luna f?t., No. 37, San 
Lorenso. 

Jone G. Garcías, Box 23. Luna st.. No. .17, San 
Lorenso. 
.350 Juun íiahriel, Box 2. Manatí. 

Jose Roas rio, Box 2. Manatí. 
.376 Manuel Lazus, Federación Libre, Utuado. 

Antonio Roman, Federación Libre, Utuado. 
.380 Angrel Figuerva. Clules, P. R. 

M. Martines Rechani. Cíales. P. R. 
Sr^S Enrique Jordan Miranda. Box 67, Utuado. 
418 SUnrnlno D. Santiago. Pahua st.. Baranion. 

Herminio Sancbes. New Town, Bayamon. 
440 Eladio Ayaia Moura.> Flores. .32d st.. Ponce. 

Knrique Ramlrex. St. Castillo 38. PoncK. 
458 Angel M. Rivera, Comercio st.. Cidra. P. R. 

Juan R. Manjanarel, Calle "La Concha." Cidra. 
P. R. 
460 Francisco Paa Gránele. P. O. Box 807. San Juan. 

Jose Rivas, P. O. Box 807. San Juan. 
467 Roaendo Bovero Corden. Box 3.37. A recibo. 

Felix S. Gonzales Pena. Box 3.37. A recibo. 
472 George Rivera. Federación Libre. Juncos. 

Augustin Miranda. Box 127. Juncoa. 
474 Manuel Lope« Sanchez. Box 208. Caguaa. 

Acisclo Giménez, Box 298. Caguaa. 



481 Jos« Vellón Fuente*. Box 163. Bayamo» 
Juan B. Sanchez. Box 168, Bayamon. 

EEODE ISLAVD. 

*10 J. A. Allard, 1723 Westminster at, Prorldcnca. 
*94 A. B. Hohler, 128 Glenwood ave.. Pawtuckat. 



SOITTH DAKOTA. 

*168 John F. GiUberg, caro Don Almo Cigar Co.. Sloaz 
Falte. 

275 Martin Hamelin, 801 lat ave. S. B.. Aberdeen. 
•887 Wm. Horst. 412 Mulberry st.. Yankton. 

491 Geo. McUurray. Box 149. Huron. 



83 Paul Z wimer.. 212 Public aq.. NaahTlUê. 
•261 J. E. Levy, 120 Gay st.. KnoxvUle. 
•266 A. H. Johnson, 243 N. 2d st.. Uemphla. 
318 Matt Gerlacb. 11 Market sq., Chattanooga. 



128 M. Sanchez. Box 673. El Paao. 

Trinidad Orltz. Box 678. 310 Mllte at., Bl Paao. 

262 W. W. Bowen. 2413 Main at., Dallas. 
•286 M. Bloomberg. 8 and 10 Jennings ave.. Ft. Worth. 
•346 C. M. Gabbart, 213 Wyoming at., San Antonio. 

.364 H. F. Wilson. Box 53. Nacogdoches. 
*.360 W. C. (^auss. 119^ W. Houston st.. Sherman. 

4U4 Joe Amstead. 1500 Lavaca at., Austin. 

TTTAH. 

224 D. Sngden. 373 D at.. Box 664. Salt Laka City. 
867 E. J. Bcklund. Box 416, Ogden. 

YEftMOMT, 

•11 H. H. Holland. 64 Main at.. Box 118, St. Albana. 

18 D. H. Miller. Box 736. Brattleboro. 
264 John J. Toomey. 40 Wales st., Rutland. 
.371 Wesley Hoffman. 865 N. Main at. Barre. 
•421 Walter L. Boynton, 62 N. Union at., Borllngton. 

TI&OIHIA. 

133 N. J. Smith, 914 N. 28th st., Richmond. 
•198 J. L. Satterwhlte. 101 V^ Salem ave., Roanoke. 

240 E. T. Cañóles, 222 Main st.. Norfolk. 

Geo. W. Keefe, 1126 Highland ave., Norfolk. 
•412 John Q, Rosa, 1222 26th at.. Newport Newa. 

VASHOrOTON. 

•109 G. W. Makurath. Box 826. Aberdeen. 
•113 Elmer Lewie, Box 881. Tacoma. 

188 Joa. Owena. 524 First ave., 8., Seattle. 

325 W. A. Mitchell. Box 1844. 222 2d ave., Spokane. 
•^1 J. G. Duppentbaler. 843 Elk st.. Belllngbam. 

444 Geo. Surbeck. 385 S. 2d st.. Walla Walla. 

498 Jos. Tschida, 2808^ Cakes ave., Everett. 

WEST VIBOIMIA. 

479 J. F. Helmbrtght. 1062 Main st^ Wheeling. 
John M. Schenk. 102 Alley 14. Wheeling. 

WISOONBQI, 

25 Fred M. Templln. 250ÍÍ Lk)yd at, Milwaukee. 
tJohn Reichert, Brisbane Hall, Mllwaakee. 

•34 W. C. Halbleib. 815 Manaíleld at., Chippewa Falla. 

•61 Joe. J. Wagner. 946 Hood at.. La Croaae. 

•85 Jos. Meyers, 234 Balcom st., Bau Claire. 

100 C. A. Reynolds. Box 100, Bdgerton. 
•135 C. Meydam, 696 Superior st., Appleton. 
•162 John Van Scbyndle. 1720 Elm st., Green Bay. 

168 Otto .Schumann, 121 Monroe ave.. Oatakoah 

182 F. E. Lorch. 135 Murray at.. Madlaon. 

•Fred Scfauette. 140 N. Hancock at.. Bfadisoa. 
•212 H. McDonald, 1211 14th st., Superior. 
Fred Toepfer, 1912 21st st.. Superior. 

245 A. Paton, 413 Prentice ave., Ashland. 
•287 Arthur Dittman. 2020 Loula at.. Marine«te 

2!M) H. G. Chatfleld. 623 Fifth ave., Janeavllle. 

:»>4 C. E. Jones. 1322 N. Chatham at., Racine. 
•.323 Fred Kneevers. 1025 Ontario are.. Sheboygan. 
•329 Frank Konz. 117 E. 13th st., F^md du Lac. 
•341 Chas. Krobiein. 134 2d ave.. Neenah. 
•.303 John F. Wurms, 216 Arcadian ave.. Waukeaha. 
•.372 F. J. Mettelka. 212 N. Center ave.. Mamhfleld. 
♦.381 Henry Moser. 3i)7 N. 8th st.. Watertown 

447 Geo. A. Schmidt. 350 Division at.. Kenoaha. 
•477 Hugh Ooldie, «l8 8. 13th at.. Manitowoc. 
•482 V. J. Splalue, 722 Washington st., Wauaan 



CS! 



S 



HEADQUARTERS 
440 S.DEARBORN ST. 



KNOWLEOOE 

IS 

POWER 




VOL. XXXVII— NO. 3. 
MARCH, 1913. 



J 



BETTER WORKING 

AND 

LIVING CONDITIONS 



CONTENTS. 

EDITORIALS- 
TRADE NOTES. 
CORRESPON DENCE. 
OFFICIAL MATTER. 



ORGANIZATION 



JUSTICE 



i^^ 



m 



OFFICIAL-PAPER -OF -THE -C-M-I-U-OF- A- 
PUBLI SM ED • MONTH LY- AT • CHICAGO.-I LL ■ 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



Cfar Makers' Official Journal 

ISSUED MONTHLY 

O. W. PBRKINSb Editor and PubUdier 



100 



BmttMd CS Second-Class Matter. Nov. »8. 1894. at the Po* 
01ßc9 at Ckkago, 111., under Aa of March 5. 1879. 

StibtcriptioH Priet M .00 ptr year. Single copUs Un ctnts. 

Aéotr$isini rates furnished on application. 




MARCH, 1913, 



The trades union movement is world- 
wide; it is an economic and social move- 
ment. It is deeply rooted 

The Interna- in the modern industrial 
tional Movement, system. It is accelerated 

by the concentration of 
capital and the introduction of labor saving 
machinery. It is based upon some of the 
greatest forces in the universe — necessity 
and self preservation. In the mad rush for 
wealth and power, labor without organiza- 
tion would be reduced to abject slavery — 
earning a bare existence and staring in the 
face of a hopeless future. 

The necessity for self preservation, in- 
herent in the human breast, has pointed to 
the avenue of escape from a condition of 
servitude, which is most galling to every 
sense of self respect. Labor unorganized 
is in a condition akin to industrial slavery! 

The avenue of escape leads to the pro- 
tective wing of the trades union movement 
for shelter. It has developed slowly from 
the local union with its narrow field of 
operation to the National Union and Inter- 
national Union. From the local federation 
to the state federation; to the national fed- 
eration, and to a world-wide federation of 
trades unions. Moving step by step, prej- 
udices deeply rooted had to be elimmated. 
The necessity for closer and wider federa- 
tion had to be demonstrated. It has been 
an arduous and difficult task; obstacles had 
to be removed; information had to be im- 
parted, and differences in working condi- 
tions and regulations had to be explained. 
The most important feature — autonomy — 
has been preserved in full force. 

The general principles on which the 
trades union movement is based are univer- 
sal; as nearly uniform as conditions will 
permit.. Higher wages, shorter hours, fair 
shop conditions, trade agreements and labor 
legislation are inscribed in all platforms 
with but few variations. But the means, by 
which the objects requiring legislation are 
to be obtained, differ widely in eyery coun- 



try. The trades union movement in each 
country has to work out its industrial prob- 
lems in the legislative field in the line of 
experience. It has to follow the road of 
least resistance; moving step by step in the 
right direction, and appealing at all times 
for public sympathy and support. 

The phenomenal growth of the trades 
union movement, within the last decade, is 
largely due to a desire for a higher standard 
of living and to the increase in the cost of 
all necessaries of life. The introduction of 
benevolent features on a wider scale then 
ever known before has added to the perma- 
nency of the movement. It has stimulated 
confidence in the safety of the insurance 
features and in the ability to pay benefits 
promptly. 

As a further proof of our contention, we 
quote from the annual report, issued by Mr. 
Carl Legien, general secretary of the Inter- 
national Federation. The membership of 
the trades unions in New Zealand, Australia. 
South Africa and South America are not in- 
cluded in the appended table: 

MemberBhlp of all 

Unions. 

1910. 1911. 

1. Great Britain 2,440,72S 8.010,346 

2. Franco 977,S60 1,029.2S8 

5. Belgium 138.928 92,735 

4. Holland 143.860 163.689 

6. Denmark 123.864 128,224 

6. Sweden 121.180 116,600 

7. Norway 47.463 U»830 

8. Finland 24,928 19.640 

9. Germany 2,688,144 3.061.002 

10. Austria 461.282 486,268 

11. Bosnia-Herzegovina 6,269 6,687 

12. Groatia-Slavonia 6.805 8.504 

18. Hungary 86.778 96,180 

14. Servia 7.418 8,337 

15. Rumania 8.615 6,000 

«-b Bulgaria 3,000 

16. Switzerland 98,797 78,119 

17. Italy 783.638 709.943 

18. Spain 40,984 80,000 

19. United States of A 1,710.433 2,282,861 

Total 9.906,189 11,485,498 

This array of figures, showing an increase 
of one and a half million members in one 
single year, indicates a still greater growth 
in the future. To say the least — the out- 
look is bright and full of encouragement. 



The Wonder Workers of the World, usu- 
ally referred to as the I. W. W., have organ- 
ized several alleged local 
Organisation, unions in the cigar trade. 

They claim to have locals 
at Tampa and Key West, Fla., New York, 
N. Y., Chicago, 111., and one or two other 
places. 

From recent happenings the indications 
point to the fact that this alleged organiza- 
tion is gettinç^ ready to make an onslaught 
on the unorganized portion of our trade. 
They, or some of them, think they see in our 



CIGAR MAKí¡ES' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



industry an opportunity to appeal to the 
poorly paid, underfed, underclothed unfor- 
tunates, and by holding up glittering gen- 
eralities with about ten cents a month 
dues, to stampede them into the ranks of 
the I. W. W. 

At the Baltimore convention we pointed 
out the number of the unorganized and 
where located, and earnestly advocated a 
plan which, if adopted, would at least have 
given us a better chance to meet condi- 
tions such as may confront us at any mo- 
ment. 

We were not in favor of Class A plan 
from choice, but because circumstances, 
environment and conditions seemed to de- 
mand that something of that nature should 
be put into operation in an effort to or- 
ganize these unfortunato6. 

We believe that certain people who pre- 
tended to be in favor of a fifteen-cent class 
worked diligently and with subtle methods 
to defeat the plan that was finally adopted 
by the majority vote of the convention. 

While we believe that the defeat of the 
plan has in a measure handicapped our op- 
portunities to organize these people it by 
nq means has destroyed our ability to do 
so. It will require harder work, more dé- 
termination, and; a much longer time to ac- 
complish this result. 

Those who are responsible for the defeat 
of the plan cannot escape the responsi- 
bility resting upon them. 

While we believe that many earnest, loyal 
true union men voted against the plan and 
that they were . actuated in so -doing by 
nothing but the purest of motives, we are 
also of the opinion, however, that the op- 
position of some others to the plan was 
actuated by an ulterior motive. Perhaps 
they saw the handwriting on the wall. 

We intend to discuss this phase of the 
question more fully in a future issue. 



The conditions of trade have an upward 
tendency, in spite of many disturbing influ- 
ence's in the industrial 
Trade and financial world. 

StatisticB. The war in the Balk- 

ans, with its dangerous 
possibilities and uncertain future complica- 
tions, has been a disturbing factor in the 
market values of all kinds of securities. 
This is due to the fact that a large share 
of American bonds and stocks are held 
abroad for investment and speculation. The 
general slump in prices on all European 
exchanges has forced speculators to dump 
a big portion of their holdings into the 
Wall street market at a reduced price. The 



fluctuations in prices approximate nearly 
two billion dollars in the American securi- 
ties. This one factor affects the loan mar- 
ket and all kinds of business which depends 
upon credit for the weekly pay roll seri- 
ously. 

All large undertakings of new industries, 
whether in manufacturing or in transporta- 
tion, (j^epend upon the great magnates in 
finance. Without their co-operation in 
credit or othcwise, they cannot be put into 
successful oi-eration under present condi- 
tions. That this is all wrong we have to 
admit; but we are dealing with facts as 
they present thenîs^^lves. Thus the war in 
the Balkans, loll(iv\f J by demoralization in 
the financial cM>:ers of the world, has re- 
tarded the natural flow in the upward move- 
ment of new industries and the extension 
of old industries. The air is full of caution 
and hesitation, waiting like Micawber "for 
something to turn up." 

Then comes the tariff which looms up like 
a nightmare enveloped in a see-saw of 
politics, doctrines and technicalities. The 
import duty on the raw material, whether 
high or low, cannot be ignored in the proc- 
ess and cost of production. The' manufac- 
turer of Sumatra wrapped cigars has lost 
his footing; he does not know where he is 
going to land. A change of half a dollar in 
duty on a pound is liable to involve him in 
a, mess of difficulties with the jobber. As a 
consequence stocks on hand are likely to be 
reduced to the lowest possible limit re- 
quired for immediate consumption. 

If the contemplated new tariff schedules 
on tobacco could be settled within a few 
months, cigar manufacturers could adjust 
their business to new conditions without 
much friction. It is the uncertainty and 
delay caused by fruitless debates, with the 
sole view to gaining political advantage, 
which compel the manufacturer to pursue 
a waiting policy. He cannot afford to accu- 
mulate stock which is likely to be depre- 
ciated by a change in the price of raw ma- 
terial. For the same reason the jobber in 
cigars will not stock up in goods. The dis- 
tribution of goods, in all probability, will 
be based on a hand-to-mouth policy. 

The cigar trade for the month of Janu- 
ary, 1913, was comparatively fair — from 
middling to good. It is usually one of the 
dullest months in the winter season; but 
compared with the same month one year 
ago, the increase in production has exceeded 
over 12 per cent. This is most gratifying 
and lends encouragement for the spring 
season. 

The principal increase was, as usual, in 



OlGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



tlic olicaji (iislrii-ts itS i!ic llrsl iiiui ninth 
Pennsylvania, tliird N'cw York, lifth Ncw 
Jcrscy. first Michigan, setcjiul Virginia, etc. 
In distritts where the output is composed 
almost wholly of union-made cigars, the in- 
crease has been íair, but lacks in volume 
when compared with the cheap districts. 
For more detailed information we refer to 
the appended table, which, though incom- 
plete, affords a fair view of trade condi- 

Januarv. January, Increase. 

DlHtrlct. 191S. 1912. Decrease.» 

Alatiams 492,000 BA.EBO 

CaJltomla, Ist.. 3,869.110 30 920* 

Calltomla. tth... l,2gT.T30 225, TtO* 

Colorado 1,382.440 43.840' 

Oonnectlcut .. * '" ST8,7Z4 

Florida B, 717.916 

Georgia :79.44S* 

llUnolB, lEt 1,714,730 

minóla. 8tti... 343,707 

IltlnolB. 13th.. S1.700* 

Indiana, «th.. S3I.33S 

Indiana. 7th. . t,9O0,E73 

Iowa, 4th.'.*"; E0Í337 

Kansas 220,196 

Kentucky, Id. 

Kentucky, Mh 1,009.497 919,970 

Kentucky, «th 621.450 67,260* 

Kentucky. 7th 223.860 4,050 

Kentucky, Sth 13,000 II.SOO* 

Louisiana ... 3,189,533 25.896* 

Maryland S,!3J.410 2.425,900 

Massachusetts 14,244,060 942,263 

Michigan, let. 21.397,807 2,970.483 

Michigan, 4th. 3,674,300 1,006,667 

Missouri, 1st, 8,689,823 63.627 

Missouri, 6th, 1,879.910 397,100 

Montana S47.T96 147.Í64 

Nebraska 341,600 

New Hampshli 682,733 

New Jersey, li 640.223 

New Jersey. 6 6.367,813 

New Mexico,, 6,500 

New York, la' 1.938.820 

New York, 2d. 7S7,440 

New York, Sd 6,818.970 

New Tork, 141 690.743 

New York. 21i 680.834 

New York. 28t 386.233 

No. Carolina, ( 3.820 

No. ft So. Dak< ,.,«,... 276.723 

Ohio, 1st .... 14,362,330 1,366.493 

Ohio, iOth .... 

Ohio. 11th ,... 9,339.690 2Ï0.I90 

Ohio, ISth ,., 14,083.960 1,830.970 

Oregon 706.4R0 12,760* 

PennsylVla, li 61,712.480 iO.B30.960 

Pennsylv'ia. 91 65,170,780 14,199,800 

PennsylVla, 2; 29,732,070 936,630 

Porto Rico.... 13,417.950 9,301.610* 

Tennessee . . , 747.350 133,950 

Texas. 3d 1,044,900 197,777 

Virginia. 2d. . . 14,689.420 9.967,060 

Virginia, 6lh.. 539.900 144,090* 

Washington . 919,100 87.827 

West Virginia 

WlHconsln. 1st 6,139,489 624,908 

Wisconsin, 2d. 2,771,460 180,570 

Ex-President Taft was Johnny-on-the- 
spot and true to his weil known opposition 
to labor organizations 

Citizen Taft, and his determination to 
always keep property 
rights sacred and above human rights and 
human liberty right up to the last moment, 
!n the closing hours of the Congress he 
for the second time vetoed the Sundry Civil 
.Appropriation Bill, which carried a provi- 



sion in it that nil part i<f ihc amount ap- 
propriated for the maintenance ui the legal 
department of the government should be 
used for the purpose of prosecuting labor 
organizations for alleged violations of the 
Sherman anti-trust law. , 

Il was universally understood when the 
Sherman anti-trust law was adopted that 
it did not apply to or became operative in 
the case of labor organizations, or such 
organizations formed not for the purpose 
of dealing in commodities or for profit. 

Only in recent years has the law been 
held by the judicial arm of the federal gov- 
ernment to apply to labor organizations. 

The last two congresses recognizing the 
injustice of this attitude and presumption 
on the part of the federal government on 
two separate occasions included in the Sun- 
dry Civil Appropriation Bill a proviso that 
no part of the money so appropriated 
should be used for the purpose of prose- 
cuting labor organizations under the Sher- 
man anti-trust law, thereby practically de- 
claring that in the judgment of the major- 
ity of both the House and the Senate, they 
did not consider that labor organizations 
came under the provision of the Sherman 
anti-trust law. 

On March 4th, during the closing honrs, 
the House passed the bill over the Presi- 
dent's veto by a vote of 270 to 50, and a 
like action would probably have been taken 
by the Senate if time would have per- 
mitted. However, owing to a filibuster 
started in the Senate on another matter, all 
chances of reaching the vetoed bii! was 
lost. 

No one will welcome Citizen Bill Tak's 
enforced retirement to private life more 
than organized labor, which has been so 
persistently antagonized by him. Those 
who believe in properly rights to the ex- 
clusion of and regardless of human rights 
and human liberties or consequences there- 
of, can well say that Mr, Taft persistently 
lived up to his reputation and to their 
standard. 



Judge Deuel of the Court of Special Ses- 
sions, New York, in a case tried be- 
fore him, in which the 
Judge American Tobacco Corn- 

Denounces pany were defendants. 
Cigar Trust, from the bench openly 
denounced and accused 
the American Tobacco Company, a trust, 
of encouraging the smoking of cigarettes 
by children. 

The facts in the case briefly are that the 
agents of the Children's Society testified 
that they had found between fifteen and 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



twenty small children unaccompanied by 
guardians in a moving picture show, and 
that the proprietors of the show said the 
children had gained admission by tender- 
ing cigarette coupons which had a cash re- 
demption value of one-half cent each. The 
proprietors of the show were found guilty, 
and in imposing sentence, Judge Deuel, 
among other things said, that the Ameri- 
can Tobacco Company was seeking to 
corrupt the children by encouraging 
them to smoke cigarettes, and at the same 
time encouraging the moving picture men 
to violate the law by accepting the coupons 
for the admission of children unattended 
by parents or guardians to the show^ 

The tobacco trust is not content in its 
mad efforts to control the industry in pay- 
ing starvation wages to women and chil- 
dren, but resorts to subtle, questionable 
methods of questionable inducements to in- 
crease sales to an extent that was openly 
and vigorously denounced by Judge Deuel. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 

The trades union movement needs no de- 
fense; it has no apologies to offer. It has 
proved its usefulness^ by raising the stand- 
ard of living; by shortening the hours of 
labor; by insisting upon improved sanitary 
conditions; by making labor more re- 
spected, and by creating a public senti- 
ment in favor of a higher degree of eco- 
nomic and social justice. 

* m * 

The trades union does not demand any 
special privileges; it does not insist upon 
legislation not beneficial to the whole com- 
munity. As the most important factor in 
the industrial beehive, it claims a legitimate 
share of protection for the promotion of 

its interests. 

* * * 

The working classes, as individuals, are 
powerless; they are as helpless as a ship 
floating on the high seas without compass 
or rudder. United in trade unions, under 
competent and honest leadership, they 
wield a strength which grows in intensity 
and potentiality commensurate with a per- 
manent increase in numbers and financial 

resources. 

4t * ♦ 

A well ventilated factory with plenty of 
fresh air and sunshine is conducive to the 
preservation of health and bodily vigor. A 
cigar factory without modern sanitary ap- 
pliances is a breeding spot for tuberculosis 
commonly called the "white plague." Good, 
pure air will save many doctors' bills, 

ŇÍ * Hi 

Organization is a prime factor in the 



modern industrial development; it tends to 
educate the workers on economic questions 
affecting their interests. Without organi- 
zation the wage workers would become a 
prey of the unscrupulous manufacturers, 
unable to resist successfully reductions in 
wages and unfair shop conditions. 

* * * 

The march of trades unionism, from its 
earliest inception, is marked with the 
wrecks and failures of low dives and cheap 
John institutions that might possibly flour- 
ish during times of peace, but which have 
lamentably failed in the hour of stress and 
storm. — The Industrial Banner. 



J. E. Cox, Ex-Secretary of Union 78^ 
Hornell, who recently died in that city at 
the age of 78 years, was one of the old-time 
stanch union men of the trade. It is 
claimed that Mr. Cox was one of the char- 
ter members of the old Baltimore Union 
No. 1, which was organized over fifty years 

ago. 

* * * 

The average capitalist represents the 
greed and rapacity prevailing in the modern 
industrial ' arena. His natural sympathies 
are drowned in the ocean of avarice, and in 
the lust for money and power; he caťes not 
for the anguish of the widow and orphan. 
He is a menace to the welfare of the pres- 
ent and future generations. 

* * ♦ 

The Supreme Court of the State of New 
Jersey sustained the constitutionality of 
the Workmen's Compensation law, which 
became operative in 1911. The court sus- 
tained a decision, awarding Alida Sexton 
a verdict against the New York District 
Telegraph Company, allowing her $7.27 a 
week for three hundred weeks because of 
the death of her husband, who was killed 
by an electric shock while working for the 

company. 

* * * 

As a school for practical instruction, the 
trades union meetings have rendered valu- 
able services to the working classes; afford- 
ing instruction in parliamentary procedure; 
developing the natural abilities in debate, 
and widening the horizon on economic and 

social questions. 

« « « 

The enormous profits of the industrial 
corporations, contrasted with, the meagre 
wages paid to unskilled labor, and to 
women and children constitute a dark blot 
on our modern industrial system. Every 
strike instituted by the unorganized, right- 
fully or wrongfully, justly or unjustly, time- 



6 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



ly or untimely, presents a powerful protest 
against unfair industrial conditions. 

4t * « 

The obstacles which beset the orderly 
and healthy progress of the trades union 
movement are partly due to f«ar of dis- 
charge, victimization, apathy, indifference, 
gross selfishness, ignorance, etc. To over- 
come these obstacles a continuous educa- 
tional campaign is necessary. The benefits 
to be derived from organization have to 
be explained in season and out of season. 

* * « 

The Mutual Benefit Department of the 
Brotherhood of Railroad Telegraphers is 
based upon a rate of assessment for the 
following benefits: 

Per year. 

On $300 (Series A) $2.40 

On $500 (Series B) 3.60 

On $1,000 (Series C) 7.20 

The death claims paid to July 31, 1912. 
amounted to $821,581.47. 

« « ♦ 

Norman Hapgood, in "Collier's Weekly." 
writes in part: "No single force has done 
more to educate us, poor and rich, than 
unions. In labor, association has done so 
much good that the incidental evil is com- 
paratively small. The union has been called 
the worker's public school. It is more. It 
is the first device in the world by which 
has been introduced a fair dispute between 

poor and rich." 

♦ * * 

Three states — California, Washington 
and Colorado — have an eight-hour law for 
women. In sixteen states the working 
children are not allowed to work more than 
eight hours a day. The cheap labor of 
women and children has been a source of 
profit to greedy and unscrupulous manu- 
facturers. To check this mad career for 
profits the strong arm of the law has to 
be invoked. 

>|c « * 

^ Labor enhances the value of all natural 
resources by shaping them into articles for 
general use and consumption. It is, there- 
fore, entitled to the highest consideration 
and protection. Without this added value 
created by labor and modern inventions, 
the timber lands, the coal beds, the copper 
mines, the iron range, etc., would cease to 
be of any practical benefit to mankind. 

3(t * * 

Congressman Stanton Warburton of 
Washington has a bill before Congress and 
made a speech in behalf of same on March 
4th, in which he proposes to increase the 
Internal Revenue tax on cigars of all kinds 



to $4.50 and $12 per thousand, and to use the 
money so raised for the purpose «f building 
good roads. According to his proposition he 
would tax the poor cigarmaker for the pur- 
pose of raising about one hundred million 
dollars per year in order to build good 
roads which would be used chiefly by those 
who are fortunate enough to own automo- 
biles. The proposition to build good roads 
is not a bad one by any means, but good 
roads, especially in our agricultural dis- 
tricts, are a good thing for society at large, 
and because of this society at large ought 
to pay the cost of construction of such 
roads. 

4t * * 

It is a pretty generally settled fact that 
the new Congress, which is Democratic in 
both branches, will be called in extra session 
early in April for the purpose of revising the 
tariff. The party in power is committed to 
the policy of the revision of the tariff down- 
ward. In the February issue of the Official 
Journal we published a brief which we sub- 
mitted to the Committee on Ways and 
Means in which we dealt with both the im- 
port duty and the internal revenue tax. 
Your congressmen and senators will be at 
home in the meantime and we suggest and 
earnestly urge that committees and as 
many individuals as possible personally see 
your representatives and make your wishes 
clearly known. We urge that you be espe- 
cially strong on the question of opposing 
any increase in the internal revenue tax. 



Trade Notes. 

The shipments of cigars from Cuba to 
foreign countries for the nionth of January, 
1913, amounted to 10,507,593. For the cor- 
responding month in 1912 the exports 
amounted to 6,137,078; showing an increase 
of 4,370,515 as compared with the month of 
January of the former year. 



The production of cigars in all internal 
revenue districts, weighing more than three 
pounds per 1,000, for which taxes were paid 
in the month of January, 1913, amounted to 
588,680,183. For the corresponding month 
in 1912, taxes were paid for 519,647,260; 
showing an increase of 69,032,923 cigars as 
compared with the same month of the for- 
mer year. 

♦ * ♦ 

The production of small cigars, weighing 
less than three pounds per 1,000, paying an 
internal revenue tax of 75 cts. during the 
month of January, 1913, amounted to 86,- 
012,840. For the corresponding month in 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



1912 taxes were paid for 97,948,920; show- 
ing a decrease of 11,936,080 small cigars. 

* * * 

The "Survey" writes: "The paper tubes 
of cigarettes are rolled by tenement hands, 
and their edges, when the paste goes dry, 
are licked by tenement lips. Through the 
homes of one hundred Greek families in 
New York no less than one million ciga- 
rettes pass each year." 

« * * 

Emil Waldbott, superintendent of a cigar 
factory in Buffalo, N. Y., a branch of a 
large scale factory in Detroit, Mich., was 
fined $50 in children's court recently by 
Judge Judge for violating the state labor 
law. He was charged with allowing a child 
under sixteen years of age to work* after 
5 p. m. The child was employed as a to- 
bacco stripper. 

* t¥ * 

The Scotten-Dillon Company, tobacco 
manufacturers of Detroit, Mich., earned 
close to 65 per cent 6n its doubled capital- 
ization of $1,000,000 last year, and paid a 
total dividend of 50 per cent. In addition 
to the cash dividends a stock dividend of 
100 per cent was declared in January, 1912, 
which doubled the capital stock from $500,- 
000. The 65 per cent of earnings on $1,000,- 
000 compares with earnings of 75 per cent 
on $500,000 the preceding year. 

m * ŇI 

The United Cigar Manufacturers Com- 
pany, the second largest corporation in the 
cigar industry, at its annual meeting stated 
that their gross earnings for 1912 were $2,- 
705,824, showing an increase of $606,472 over 
1911, and the net earnings were $1,323,542, 
an increase of $231,148. The net earnings 
is equivalent to 7 per cent on the $15,000,- 
000 of common stock outstanding after the 
deductions for the preferred dividend re- 
quirements. Earnings in 1912 were 5.52 per 
cent. The surplus and reserves are $3,547,- 

308. 

* * * 

Reports on the tobacco crops of Virginia 
and Ohio, obtained at the census in April, 
1910, were issued by the Census Bureau 
some time ago. 

For Virginia it is stated that there were 
44,472 tobacco farms, comprising 185,609 
acres. The harvest of the year was 132,- 
987,490 pounds, valued at $12,169,815. To- 
bacco ranked second among the crops of 
the state in value, being only exceeded by 
corn. For the ten years from 1900 there 
was an increase of 1,275 acres or 0.7 per 
cent. 

In Ohio there were 23,119 tobacco farms, 



of 106,477 acres, which yielded 88,603,308 
pounds, valued at $8,998,887. Tobacco 
ranked sixth among the crops in value. For 
the ten years from 1900 tobacco showed an 
increase of 35,055 acres, or 49.1 per cent. 

* * * 

The introduction of cigarette machines in 
Germany was accelerated by the increase 
in the tax on cigarettes, in common with 
that on all other tobacco products, which 
became effective in 1909. 

The big manufacturers of cigarettes^ an- 
ticipated the effect of the higher tax rate by 
the extensive introduction of machinery 
into their factories, which greatly reduced 
the expense of manufacturing cigarettes, 
and thus made it possible to continue to 
sell them at the same price as formerly, in 

spite of the increased tax. 

* * « 

In 1911 the imports of the Union of South 
Africa were as follows: Cape Town, $95,- 
262 worth of cigars and cigarettes and $201,- 
410 of unmanufactured tobacco; Port Eliza- 
beth, $161,675 of cigars and cigarettes and 
$12,098 of unmanufactured; East London, . 
$59,863 of cigars and cigarettes, $204 of un- 
manufactured; Durham, $312,235 of cigars 
and cigarettes, $14,283 of unmanufactured; 
Lourenco Marquez, $14,235 of cigars and 
cigarettes, $15,189 of unmanufactured; other 
ports, $2,239 of cigars and cigarettes, $521 

of unmanufactured tobacco. 

* * ♦ 

' The number of cigar factories in Russia 
{t\ 1910 was limited to 20, which were lo- 
cated as follows: Four in the province of 
Warsaw; two in Grodna; four in Livonia; 
two in Lyublin; three in St. Petersburg; 
and one each in Moscow, Kovna, Minsk, 
Courland and ChernigoflF. The cigar in- 
dustry is a Government monopoly. 

* 4i * 

The Census Bureau reports that there 
were 51,926 tobacco farms in North Caro- 
lina in 1909, and that 221,289 acres were 
harvested, yielding 138,813,163 pounds, val- 
ued at $13,847,559. Tobacco was the third 
ranking crop ef the state, being exceeded 
only by cotton and corn. From 1899 to 1909 
tobacco increas^ed 18,867 acres or 9.3 per 
cent. The average yield per acre in 1909 
was 626 pounds, and the average value per 
acre $62.40. 

4c * 4: 

Consul General R. M. Bartleman, of 
Buenos Ayres. has submitted the follow- 
ing report to the Department of Commerce 
and Labor: 

"The value of tobacco in its various forms 
consumed in 1910 in Argentina was $39,- 



8 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



098,449 American gold, an increase of $3,- 
010,025 over 1909. The value of the do- 
mestic products of tobacco for 1910 
amounted to $31,077,608, and the importa- 
tions to $8,020,841. Of the increase in the 
consumption in 1910 only $280,219 was in 
imported products." 

♦ * * 

A tobacco raiser of Arcanum, Ohio, gave 
the following estimate of the cost of raising 
an acre of tobacco. The estimate is made 
upon an average of six growers from six 
counties, and wages are based on $1.50 for 

ten hours: 

Growing plants I 2.10 

Plowing ground 2.33 

Fittlnfir ground 2.60 

PertUlřer 6.00 

Applying fertilizer 64 

Transplatlng 2.82 

Cultivating 3.46 

Hoeing 1.75 

Worünlng 1.82 

Topping 1.10 

Suckerlng 3.93 

Cutting 6.71 

Stripping 10.00 

Packing 172 

Marketing 47 

Total $46.25 

Yield per acre, pound». 928.6 

Value per acre, at 10 centä $92.86 

Profit $46.61 

* * ♦ 

It was announced last month that Presi- 
dent Taft had signed the "Free Smoker" 
bill, which allows each cigarmaker the use 
of twenty-one cigars a week for consump- 
tion in the factory, these cigars are to be 
allowed free of internal revenue tax. 

« * * 

The grand jury of Henderson, Ky., re- 
turned an indictment against the Imperial 
Tobacco Company of Kentucky and the 
Imperial Tobacco Company of Great Britain 
accusing them of combining to depress the 
price of leaf and strip tobacco in Hender- 
son county Kentucky, at a price below the 
real value, in consequence of which the to- 
bacco producers are compelled to sell it 
below its value. 

♦ 3<l * 

The experiments with shade-grown to- 
bacco of the Sumatra type in the Connecti- 
cut valley are now proving a profitable 
venture. 

There were 1,877 acres planted in 1912, as 
against 2,200 in 1911, a decrease last year 
of 323 acres. While there is some effort be- 
ing made to produce Sumatra in Florida 
and Georgia, it is making slow progress, 
but the projectors have faith in makinp: it a 
profitable business in time. 



The United Cigar Manufacturers' Com- 
pany announce that they have executed 
preliminary agreements with M. A. Gutist 
& Co. of San Francisco,- Cal., by which M. 
A. Gunst & Co. will consolidate their en- 
tire business with this company in 1913. 
M. A. Gunst & Co. operate clear Havana 
factories in Tampa and Key West, and are 
one of the largest cigar distributors on the 
Pacific coast. 



Professor Robert Woerner, a German in- 
ventor, claims to have perfected and pat- 
ented a machine for packing cigars. It is 
claimed that "the invention is based upon 
the idea that three points had to be 
focussed, namely: 

"(1) Improving of the appearance of 
cigars. 

"(2) Mechanical distribution of the un- 
avoidable irregularities during the making 
of the cigar. 

"(3) Saving of time and labor and in- 
suring methodical work. 

"This is done through an ingenious press- 
ing machine filled with automatic tin-plated 
cases, into which cigars have previously 
been laid, permitting the packing of lOO's, 
50's, 40's, 20's, bundles, in fact, any number 
desired. 

"The machine has horizontal and vertical 
pressure and permits an intermission of the 
pressure in two directions, by which it is 
attained that the cigars have a compensat- 
ing reaction against the occasional pressure. 
The importance of the intermittent pressure 
has thus been acknowledged by all of the 
patent offices in the different nations 
throughout the world, that the intermittent 
process, as such, has been patented. It is 
seldom that the patent office protects a 
process. Cracking is guaranteed impossible 
under this patent press system. 

"It may be added that under the patent 
intermittent process not only is an over- 
pressure of the cigars impossible, but also 
the shape of the same in each layer of the 
box remains unaltered. 

"Through the pressure between pairs of 
plates, which regularly vary their mutual 
distances with mathematical exactitude, the 
possibility of an absolutely reg^ular pressure 
as desired, is provided. 

"The pressing by Woerner's machine re- 
quires only a few minutes, and the packing 
of the cigars can be undertaken after one or 
two hours. The daily capacity of the ma- 
chine is approximately 25,000 cigars. 



rt 



CÎGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURíÍAL 



KËrÔRT OF DELEGATES TO THE 
A. F. OF L. CONVENTION. 

To the officers and members of the Cigar 

Makers' International Union. 

Greetlnirf We, the underslgrned déléguâtes, heg 
leave to submit the following report coverinff 
the Important matters transacted at the thirty- 
second annual convention of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, held in Kochester, N. Y. 

The convention opened Monday morning, No- 
vember 11, at 10 a. m., by President Samuel 
Gompers, who Introduced to the convention 
Richard H. Curran, chairman of the Committee 
on Arrangements, who delivered an address of 
welcome. He was followed by the Hon. H. H. 
Edgerton, Mayor of Rochester. N. Y., who wel- 
comed the delegates on behalf of the city. Mr. 
John Williams, Commissioner of Labor for the 
state of New York, delivered an address of wel- 
come aa the representative of the Governor of 
the state, who was unable to be present in 

gerson. Commissioner Williams was followed 
y President Dsj^iel Harris of the New York 
Sjtate Federation of Labor, who welcomed the 
delegates on behalf of the organized workers of 
the state. 

The addresses of welcome were replied to in 
an appropriate manner by President Ctompers. 

The Committee on Credentials reported that 
there were 862 delejprates present, representing 
86 international and national unions, 30 state 
branches, 77 central bodies, 19 local trade and 
federal labor unions, and eight fraternal dele- 
gates, all of whom were entitled to seats. 

President Gompers then submitted his annual 
report, which dealt with the following subjects: 

Canada. 

Porto Rioo. 

Citizenship for Porto Rlcans. 

BuUding Trades Department 

Metal Trades' Department. 

Mining D;^ar^ent. 

Railroad Sänployes' Department. 

Union Label Trades Department. 

Carl Legien's Visit. 

Labor Forward Movement. 

Organization of Steel Workers. 

Migratory Workers. \ 

Arbitration, Mediation and Conciliation 
(The Erdman Act — ^Extension of) 

Labor Day and Labor Sunday. 

American Federation of Labor Political 
Campaign — Its Results. 

The Sztension of Eight-Hour Law. 

The New Eight-Hour Law. 

Construction by the Government. 

Injunction Limitation Bill. 

Jury Trial in Contempt Cases. 

Seamen's Rights. 

Immigration and Chinese Exclusion. 

Child Labor and Children's Bureau. 

Initiative, Referendum and Recall. 

Limit Judges' Tenure. 

Popular Election of United States Senators. 

Citizenship Rights Restored. 

Second-class Postal Rates. 

Contract Convict Labor System. 



Boiler Inspection. 
Ic Muiagc 
Employers' Liability and Workmen's Com- 



Sclentiflc 



magement. 



pensatlon. 

Old -Age Pensions. 

Occupational Diseases. 

Anti-Watered-Stock Gambling. 

Wider Use of the Schools. 

A. F. of L. Exhibit at San Francisco, 1916. 

Organizers. 

IjSkOor Press. 

American Federationalist. 

The report is a very comprehensive one and 
deals with almost every phase of the labor 
movement, and your delegates would recommend 
that, as in previous years, this report be printed 
in our official Journal as space will permit. 

Secretary Morrison reported that the balance 
on hand September 30, 1911, was 1189,579.56. 
The income for the year was 1207.373.60, making 
a total of $396,953.16. The total expense for the 
year ending September 30, 1912, was 3277, 479. 23. 
leaving a balance on hand of 1119,473.93. 

Treasurer Lennon reported balance on hand, 
deposited in banks in Bloomlngton, 111., bearing 



interest, and also bonded by the American 
Surety Company, as $117,473.93, the balance in 
the hands of Secretary Morrison. $2,000, making 
a total In the funds of the American Federation 
of Labor, September 30, 1912, of $119,473.93. 

The report of the Executive Council, covering 
matters considered by them during the year, 
was read and referred to the Appropriation 
Committees. 

This report is agreed to by all as being the 
most comprehensive one ever submitted by. the 
Executive Council to a convention of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor. 

In it is considered, among other matters, sev- 
eral questions of Jurisdictional dispute that have 
been settled during the year, particularly among 
them being the amalgamation of the Amalga- 
mated Wood Workers with the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners; also the settle- 
ment of the dispute between the sheet metal 
workers and the metal polishers, the glass bottle 
blowers and the flint glass workers, and other 
matters of importance. 

Among the most important matters considered 
in the rei>ort of the Ehcecutive Council was the 
question of affiliating the yet unaffiliated or- 
ganizations, and it is hoped that this desired 
result will be brought about in several Instances 
during the coming year. 

In connection with the Jurisdictional dispute 
between the flint glass workers and the Inter- 
national Association of Machinists, the Execu- 
tive Council in its report upon this subject 
matter Included what is known as the autonomy . 
declaration as adopted by the Scran ton (Pa.) 
convention in 1901. This subject matter is cov- 
ered in other parts of this report; in the con- 
sidering of resolution No. 116 and the declaration 
of the Scranton convention Is quoted in fuU. 
and that declaration was reaffirmed. 

It is as follows: 

AUTONOMY DECLARATION.« 

Scranton, Pa., Dec. 14, 1901. 
"To the officers and delegates to the twenty-flrrft 

annual convention of the American Federation 

of Labor: 

"Greeting— The undersigned, your special 
committee appointed to consider the question 
of the autonomy of the trade unions, beg leave 
to say that it is our Judgment the future suc- 
cess, permanency and safety of the American 
Federation of Labor, as well as the trade unions 
themselves, depends upon the recognition and 
application of the principle of autonomy, con- 
sistent with the varying phases and transitions 
In industry. 

'*We realize that it is impossible to deflne the 
exact line of demarcation wherew one trade or 
form of labor ends and another begins, and that 
no hard and fast rule can be devised by which 
all our trade unions can be governed or can 
govern themselves. 

"We emphasize the impossibllty of the estab- 
lishment of hard and fast lines; but if history 
and experience in the labor movement count 
for aught we urge upon our fellow workmen 
that toleration and forbearance which are pro- 
verbial of our movement; for. without the rec- 
ognition and application of these qualities, any 
decision we may formulate will be futile. We, 
therefore, recommend as follows: 

'*1. As the magnificent growth of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor is conceded by all 
students of economic thought, we declare that, 
as a general proposition, the interests of the 
workers will be best conserved by adhering as 
closely to that doctrine as the recent great 
changes in methods of production and employ- 
ment make practicable. However, owing to the 
isolation of some few industries from thickly 
populated centers where the overwhelming 
number follow one branch thereof, and owing 
to the fact that in some industries compara- 
tively few workers are engaged over whom 
separate organizations claim Jurisdiction, we be- 
lieve that Jurisdiction in such industries by the^ 
paramount organizations would yield the best 
results to the workers therein, at least until 

«The above declaration, as here given, is as 
c^orrected by the New Orleans convention, page 
143. 



10 



ClGAß MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



the developing of organization of each branch 
ha» reached a stage wherein these nnay be 
placed, without, material injury to all parties in 
interest, in affiliation with their national Irade 
unions. Nothing contained in this declaration 
is intended or shall be construed to mean a 
reversal of any decision rendered by former 
executive councils or previous conventions on 
questions of Jurisdiction. 

"2. We hold that the interests of the trade 
union movement will be promoted by closely 
allied and subdivided crafts giving consideration 
to amalgamation, and to the organization of 
district and national trade councils to which 
should be referred questions in dispute, and 
which should be adjudged within allied crafts' 
Iine&. 

"3. The American Federation of Labor being 
a voluntary association, cannot direct and 
should not adopt methods antagonistic to or in 
conflict with established trade union laws, and 
in order to carry the above recommendations 
into effect, and in full recognition of its logical 
position, the American Federation of Labor 
pledges its officers to aid and assist in the ad- 
justment of such craft encroachments as dis- 
putants may be willing to submit to its arbitra- 
ment. 

SAMUEL GOMPERS, 
JAMES DUNCAN. 
JOHN MITCHELL, 
JOHN MULHOLLAND, 
C. N. HUGHES. 

Committee.*' 

"In connection with this declartion It Is nec- 
essary to call attention to a frequent miscon- 
ception of the term 'autonomy' as it is used 
by the American Federation of Labor. Some 
have mistakenly Interpreted it to mean that a 
trade union cannot expand Its Jurisdiction, or 
amalgamate with another organization of the 
same, or, if a kindred trade, in the same In- 
dustry. The term 'autonomy,' as applied, has 
been used as an obstacle to such extension, 
growth and amalgamation. No such construc- 
tion or interpretation can be Justly given the 
term. Broadly and specifically speaking, the 
term autonomy,' means self government, as 
automaton and automatic, self-acting; autobi- 
ography, self-writing the history of one's own 
life; automobile, self-propelling; deriving Its 
general application from the root word auto, 
sell. We are prompted to this explanation by 
several instances in which the term 'industrial 
"ViS'^K"*' Í« applied, as against trade unionism, 
with Its autonomous self-government, as well 
as by a circular which was recently issued by 
the Metal Traces Council of Toledo, Ohio, in 
which the affiliated organizations and the dele- 
gates to this convention are urged to favor an 
amendment to the constitution of the American 
Federation of Labor, so that, 

'* 'National cmd international trade unions 
shall have the right to amalgamation; such 
amalgamation must be endorsed by a refer- 
endum vote of the organizations affected, and 
a two-thirds affirmative vote of the members 
voting uDon such amendment in each organiza- 
tion, shall be necessary to make the amendment 
legal and binding.' 

"Such a proposition is based upon the mis- 
conception that the American Federation of 
Labor prevents, or has the power to prevent or 
place oDstacles In the way of, amalgamation of 
national or international trade unions when they 
so desire to amalgamate, when as a matter of 
fact every effort has been made by the A. F. 
of L., the Executive Council and our organiza- 
tions to bring about amalgamation of national 
and international unions, and. where that has 
been impossible for the time being, to endeavor 
to have them co-operate and federate for their 
mutual advantage.'^ 

Other Important matters contained In the 
report of the Executive Council and which were 
considered by the various committees and acted 
upon by the convention are as follows: 

Authority and Self-imposed Discipline. 

Strikes and Lockouts of Directly Ařflllated 
Local and Federal Labor Tenions. 

Contempt Case. 

New Injunction Rule. 



Hatters' Case. 

i»ost vs. A. F. of L. and Buck's Stove & 

Range Company. 
Farmers' Educational and Co-operative 

Union of America. 
Labor's Political Program, 1912. 
Federal Bureau of Health. 
Industrial Education. 
International secretariat. 
Conservation of National Resources. 
The McNamara Case. 
American Federation of Labor Publicity. 
Boy Scout Movement. 
Combining Official Reports to Conventions. 

The delegates feel that these Important sub- 
jects, as reported by the Executive Council, 
should be carefully read and studied by our 
members, and hence would recommend that the 
same be published In our official Journal. Fur- 
ther on in this report we will give two further 
sections of the Executive Council's report to the 
Rochester convention. They will be found in- 
teresting. 

Delegates Berry and Walker, fraternal dele- 
gates to the British Trade Union Congress, held 
at Newport. Wales, and Delegate John T. Smith, 
fraternal delegate to the Canadian Trades and 
Labor Congress, held at Guelph. Ontario. Can- 
ada, made their reports. All of these reports 
showed the interest and value of the exchange 
of fraternal delegates, both with Great Britain 
and Canada. 

A very Interesting and instructive address was 
delivered by the Hon. William B. Wilson, for- 
mer secretary- treasurer of the United Mine 
Workers of America, and now chairman of the 
House Committee on Labor. 

The fraternal delegates from Great Britain, 
Robert SmiUie of the Federation of Miners' and 
James A. Seddon of the shop assistants (retail 
clerks), and John W. Bruce of the Canadian 
Trades and Labor Congress, delivered interest- 
ing addresses conveying fraternal greetings of 
the respective organizations they represented. 

One hundred and thirty resolutions were in- 
troduced and acted upon, and referred to many 
various subjects. 

One of the most important subjects considered 
by the convention was the resolution adopted at 
the Atlanta convention calling for an investiga- 
tion of the subject of the election of the officers 
of the American Federation of Labor by the 
initiative and referendum. The Executive Coun- 
cil reported that an exhaustive Investigation 
had been made, covering every organization af- 
filiated with the American Federation of Labor, 
as well as a number of organizations in Great 
Britain. Germany, FrcLnce, Switzerland. Norway, 
Denmark and Netherlands. Inquiries were also 
made of the following unaffiliated organiza- 
tions: 
Bricklayers and Masons. 
Locomotive Firemen and Englnemen, 
Ix)comotlve Engineers. 

Railway Trainmen and Railway Con<^luctors. 
The following Is the report as tabulated from 
the replies received from the organizations com- 
municated with: 

"Number of national and international unions 
which elect their officers by the referendum 

system 3| 

Number of national and International unions 
which elect their officers by the convention 

system 75 

Number of national and international unions 
favoring election of A. F. of L, officers by 
the Inlflatlve and referendum system (rep- 
resenting 508.116 members) 23 

Number of national and international unions 
aiîainst election of A. F. of L. officers by the 
Initiative and referendum (representing 890,- 

240 members) 52 

"A number of organizations, representing 331.- 
787 members, have made no report or have ex- 
pressed themselves as having no definite opinion 
upon the matter." 

It will be seen from the figures above given 
that only 34 national and international unions 
elect thetr officers by a referendum syeteiD. 
while 75 international unions elect their officers 
bv thr convention system. 
It Is also called to your^ attention that a num- 



CIGAR MAKEES' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



11 



bar of organizations representlngr 331,787 mem- 
ber« b&ve made no report or expressed them- 
selves as having any definite opinions upon this 
subject matter. It is also called to your atten- 
tion that of the 34 international unions which 
«lect their oflicers by the referendum system. 
that there is not one of them who have any con- 
crete system such as applies in the Clgarmakers' 
International Union. 

You will also notice that there are 75 interna- 
tional unions who have no laws govemingr the 
election of officers except in conventions, which 
to our opinion shows conclusivelv not only the 
impracticability, but the impossibility, of put- 
ting into operation at present any practical sys- 
tem of electing the officers of the American 
Federation of Labor by the initiative and refer- 
endum. 

Your attention is further called to the fact 
that even among some of the organizations 
which elect their officers by the initiative and 
referendum, that the delegates from several of 
these organizations expressed themselves m 
being opposed to this system because of its im- 
practicability in the election of the A. P. of L. 
officers. 

Your attention is further called to the fact 
that 52 organizations with an approximate mem- 
bership of 890.000 have reported as being opposed 
to this system, while 23 organizations with an 
approximate membership of 508.000 favor it, and 
a number of other organizations with an approx- 
imate membership of 330,000 have made no re- 
port or made an expression of opinion upon thisi 
sublect matter. 

The report of the Executive Council on this 
subject matter also shows that organizations In 
other countries were communicated with rela- 
tive to the manner ih which their officers were 
elected. 

Out of the many trade unions of Great Britain 
but five reported having the Initiative and refer- 
endum in the election of their own officers. Not 
In any other British trade union does that sys- 
tem prevail. The officers of the British Trade 
Union Congress and the officers of the British 
Federation of Trade Unions elected their officers 
at conventions. 

Reports were received from 24 national tradt» 
unions of Germany, not one of which elected 
their officers by the initiative and referendum. 
All of them elect their officers In conventions. 
The officers of the Federation of Trade Unions of 
Germany are elected in conventions every two 
years. 

Reports were also received from organizations 
in Prance. Sweden. Norway, Denmark and Swit- 
zerland, and in all instances except Switzerland 
and Netherlands the national trade unions re- 
ported that their officers were elected in con- 
vention. I "•^«w 
In no country in the world are the officers of 
any national federation of organized labor such 
as the American Federation of Labor elected by 
the initiative and referendum system. In no 
country except Bngland ar<» the officers elected 
at the conventions by so democratic a method 
as prevails in the A. P. of L.. where delegates 
cast their votes in the elections and in legisla- 
tion in nroportlon to the membership they re- 
spectively represent. 

However, the report of the Executive Council 
upon this subject, together with three resolu- 
tions. Nos. 112, 114 and 118. dealing with the 
election of officers by the initiative and refer- 
endum system, were referred to the Committee 
on Resolutions, which later in the convention 
mp<^<» the following report: 

••Your committee while In full accord with the 
declarations of the American Federation of La- 
bor on the application of the Initiative and refer- 
endum to the election of public officials and the 
enactment of general leřrlslatlon. does not be- 
lieve that it would be Pdvisable to applv this 
meth^^d to the election of officers of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor Tn thp political fleld 
and on ouestlons of leprlslatlon there la nubile 
and common information as fully available to 
one citizen as to any other through the public 
fo»*tim and the press. 

"Your committee Is a warp that there are or- 
ganizations affiliated with the American Feder- 



Natlon of Labor which elect their officers by the 
initiative and referendum: also that some af- 
filiated organizations which at one time applied 
the initiative and referendum to the election of 
their officers have returned to the convention 
system because of their experiences under the 
former method, and that many affiliated organi- 
zations have not considered it advisable to adopt 
the initiative and referendum for that purpose. 
. "On that phase of the question members of 
unions electing officers through the initiative 
and referendum have opportunities through 
trade information of knowing something con- 
cerning the availability and qualifications of 
candidates for office. 

•'On the subject of applying the initiative and 
referendum to the election of the officers of the 
American Federation of Labor, your committee 
Is as fully aware that neither of the preceding 
opportunities of essential information are ap- 
parent. The members of one union have little 
opportunity of receiving trade or other knowl- 
edge concerning the availability or personnel of 
members and nominees of other unions for of- 
ficers of the American Federation of Labor. 
A Dart from the enormous cost of such a method 
of election, the possibility of irregularities In 
connection therewith; the evident multiplicity of 
nominations which would follow, and the Impos- 
sibility of guaranteeing an election by a num- 
ber approaching a majority vote, there is the 
evident fact that there are neither adequate 
methods of conducting such elections nor are 
there available opportunities for the dissemina- 
tion of proper and essential information to prop- 
erlv conduct such an election. 

Your committee has examined the report of 
the Executive Council upon the subject under 
consideration and find that in reply to the cir- 
cular letter sent to all affiliated organizations on 
this matter as a result of the action of the At- 
lanta convention on the subject, the officers of 52 
affiliated organizations, representing 890.240 
members, recorded themselves as opnosed to the 
♦»lection of officers of the American Federation of 
lAbor by the Initiative and referendum, while 
the officers of but 23 affiliated orRanlzatlons, 
renresentlng 5(tf.llfi members, expressed them« 
selv*»8 In favor of this system. 

'•For the reasons submitted and in view of the 
nresent method wherein renresentative conven- 
tions officers are elected with due regard to their 
nbilltv. fitnAPs for th*». office for which they are 
pA]PPted. w'th fair and just consideration for th*» 
rlehts of affiliated orsranlzatlons. vour committee 
'•'»commend.«» non -concurrence with the ri^solu- 
♦*ons on*» member of the committee. Delegate 
Ward, being recorded as not supporting the 
committee's report." 

An extensive, *»amest and interesting debat*» 
followed, after which the vote was taken, with 
the following result: 

193 delciarates voted in the affirmative: 57 dele- 
fřqtes voted In the neeatlve. The renort of the 
committee on Resolutions was therefore adopt- 
ed. 

The delegates from the TTnitcd Mine Workers 
Introduced Resolution No. 11«. declaring in favor 
of "Industrial T^nlonlsm," which the Committee 
on "Rducation gave consideration and later re- 
Dorted unfavorably. One member of the com- 
mittee submitted a minority report. The major- 
ity report non-concurred In Resolution 11«. and 
favorpd the autonomy declaration of the Rcran- 
ton convention as corrected by the New Orle«ns 
convention, and which is already quoted In this 
renort. The one member of the committee sub- 
mitting a minority report in favor of a form of 
industrial unionism. In connection herewith 
should be noted the report of the Executive 
Council unon the sublect. After statine a larsr«» 
number of Instances in which organizations had 
become amalgamated, as well as departments 
created, the Fxecutive Council said: 

"So on mle-ht we quote nearlv all of th*» na- 
tional and international unions In their constant 
effort to a more thorough and comprehensive o»-- 
>?an1s9atlon of their own fellow-workers In the 
trade, or in kindred trades. 

'•And yet It In also true that In some few or- 
firanlzatlons the amalgamation of various 
branches of one Industry having been accom- 



12 



CIGAR MAKERS^ OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



pushed, they have voluntarily separated into a 
number of international unions of their respec- 
tive branches. That is especially tnie of the In- 
ternational Typographical Union, which until 
some years a.go had under its Jurisdiction and 
part of the organization the compositors, proof- 
readers, pressmen, bookbinders, stereotypere and 
electrotypers, mailers, news writers, bhoto-en- 
gravers. By agreement, the book binders, ster- 
eotypere and electrotypers and photo-engravers 
have formed separate organizations from the 
International Typographical Union, and general- 
ly co-operating in their local and national coun- 
cils. 

"The American trade union movement is one 
of constant growth, development and expansion. 
Since its inception the American Federation of 
Labor has been the most practical and beneficial 
general organization of the wage- workers of the 
continent; have taken cognizance of the constant 
change and transition in industry, and by every 
means within Its power has sought not only to 
effect the organization of unorganized workers, 
. but to bring about unity, solidarity and frater- 
nity among organized workers, and has stimu- 
lated by every means within its power the ne- 
cessity for closer co-operation, federation and 
amalgamation of existing trade unions, to the 
end that each may be helpful to all. 

"The American Federation of Labor realizes 
that a chain is no stronger than its weakest 
Ink; that the grand army of organized labor 
cannot advance much further than its most 
backward column; that the labor organizations 
are made up of human beings who are not cast 
in plastic molds: cannot be placed In rigid forms, 
and, therefore, it must concede that the author- 
ity vested In the afllllated unions and their 
members must be the largest consistent with 
the general progress and the welfare of the en- 
tire wage-working masses. 

"The American Federation of Labor has or- 
ganized central bodies in hundreds of cities, and 
state federations In nearly all the states in 
America; has instituted a large number of in- 
ternational unions and numberless local unions, 
and has developed the system of industrial de- 
partments which federate the organized workers 
of the different crafts, trades apd callings, and 
which co-operate for the common protection and 
advancement of the interest of all. 

"The American Federation of Labor realizes 
that there Is still much to do. but repudiates the 
Insinuation which is Implied by the term "Indus- 
trial Unionism" as It Is employed by the so- 
called "Industrial Workers of the World" in an- 
tagonism to "Trade Unionism," for in that Im- 
plication the false impression is conveyed that 
the trade unions are rigid, unyielding or do not 
adjust themselves to meet new conditions and 
do not advance, develop or expand, whereas the 
whole history of the trade union movement in 
the past thirty years demonstrate beyond suc- 
resBTul contradiction that there is not a daj' 
which passes but which witnesses In the trade 
union movement In America the highest and lof- 
tiest spirit of sacrifice in order to co-operate 
with our fellow workers for their Interest and 
common uplift. 

"In line with the historic, Intelligent and com- 
prehensive attitude which the American Fede- 
ration of Labor ha.s pursued since its Inception, 
we urpe still greater effort and energy in the 
work of more thoroughly organizing the unor- 
ganized workers, pursued to its fullest extent; 
to urge upon the organized workers a more thor- 
ough co-operation, to advocate amalgamation of 
organizations of kindred trades and callings, 
and a more thorough federation of all organized 
labor, to the end that economic, political, moral 
and social Uistice shall come to the tollers— the 
wealth producers of America." 

A roll-call was ordered on the minority report. 
The minority report was defeated by the follow- 
ing vote: Yens. r,.929; nays. lO.O.Tl. The major- 
ity report was then adopted. 

In regard to tlio subject inn tt or of tlio onlerlv 
development and extension of tlio lahor move- 
ment the Executive Council reported under the 
caption of "Authority and Pelf-Tmposed Disci- 
pline." It Is a subject so pregnant with import- 
ant events connected with our movement that 
we quote It herein as follows: 



"In connection with the general subject mat- 
ter of the electrical workers and question« of a 
kindred character, attention should be callefl to 
the fact that in conformity with the laws of the 
A. F. of L. and the actions and declarations of 
its conventions, the charter of the Alameda 
County Central Labor Council. California, was 
revoked because that body refused to abide by 
the decision and the laws of the A. F. of L. in 
the electrical workers' matter. 

"Information has come to us that a committee 
of three representing the Alameda County C. I* 
U. has visited several places In California solic- 
iting support in their refusal to abide by the 
laws and decisions of the A. F. of L. and for the 
organizaUon of a dual and rival body to the A. 
F. of L. on the Pacific Coast. 

"Your attention is called to this particular 
case for several reasons, only a few of which 
need here be stated. Somewhere in the labor 
movement of America there must be lodged 
some degree of authority or expression of judg- 
ment. To this authority interested parties 
should defer for investigation, discussion, final 
Judgment and ultimate determination all dis- 
puted matters affecting the internal relations 
or the organized labor movement coming, prop- 
®'':X«ř?'^''* **^6 American Federation of Labor. 

«,,ITii® 1 ^"Í^Sí'^V' I® JH^ö *« ^ ^Wch dis- 
putant is held to be right and which to be 
wrong, should endeavor, with all the influence 
which can be brought to bear through our move- 
nient, to adjust such disputes, conflicts and 
claims so that the unity and solidarity of the 
labor movement may be maintained. 

"If this position be right, the question arises 
as to where that authority shall be vested. If 
the American Federation of Labor. In its con- 
ventions, or between conventions, the executive 
Council, is not the constituted authority, where, 
pray, shall such authority be lodged? In any 
one central body? If that be Justified, then why 
not a single local union? And if that be proper, 
then each individual member of a union may 
be constituted a law unto himself. Then, how 
can any general policy or purpose be outlined 
or a coherent, practical course be pursued in 
the Interests of the general welfare of the toil- 
ers of our continent? 

"The laws, the policies and the decision of the 
A. F. of L. are based upon the combined Judg- 
ment of the toilers of America. There is no 
power lodged anywhere In our movement by 
which the laws, policies and decisions thereof 
can be made effective unless it be the general 
consensus of opinion and Judgment of the or- 
ganized wage-earners and the respect and con- 
fidence which they have In the movement and 
the men they have chosen to represent them. It 
depends for success upon the devotion of the 
rank and file of organzed labor to the cause of 
unionism for furtherance of their own Interests 
and the common welfare. 

"In the absence of any power to enforce laws, 
policies and decisions (and our movement aims 
at the avoidance of such force and powers), 
there must come to our fellow-workers the un- 
derstanding that some degree of discipline must 
be maintained, but that only through discipline 
which is self-imposed and maintained for the 
progressive and orderly conduct of the labor 
movement of our ^Ime can the integrity and en- 
tity of our movement be safeguarded ; so that it 
may be of the greatest value and infiuence in 
securing for the toiling masses of our country 
the opportunity and the means for the attain- 
ment of the highest and best possible condi- 
tions. 

"Because of the action of the Central Labor 
Council of Alameda County and other instances 
of a similar character, we believe that this 
convention should express itself in no unmis- 
takable terms as to the moral duty and obliga- 
tion of every affiliated body loyally to give ef- 
fect to decisions of the conventions of the 
American Federation of Labor — the highest au- 
. thority In the organized labor movement of 
America." 

The Atlanta convention declared that there 

should be but one organization of one trade and 

further declared that there Should be but one 

organization represented In the pipe fittims 

trades, that organization to be the United As- 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



13 



sociation of Plumbers, Gas Fitters, Steam Fit- 
ters and Steam Fitters Helpers of the United 
States and Canada. This subject matter was 
discussed in Resolution 121, which was reported 
upon adversely by the Adjustment Committee, 
and in accordance with the constitution, thu 
charter of the International Association of 
Steam, Hot Water and Power Pipe Fitters and 
Helpers was revoked by a vote of 15,776 in favor 
to 1,822 aéralnst, and 230 not voting. 

Many other important matters, notably the 
decision in the Hatters' case, the Sherman an- 
ti-trust law, contempt cases, anti-injunction, 
and others, were discussed and acted upon by 
the convention. 

President Gompers appointed your delegates 
upon the following important committees: 

Committee on president's Report — Tracy. 

Committee on Labels — Barnes. 

Committee on Adjustment — ^Fitzgerald. 

Committee on Education — Mueller. 

The result of the election of officers was as 
follows: Delegates Qompers of the CIgarmakers' 
International Union and Hayes of the Interna- 
tional TyiMgraphlcal Union were nominated for 
president. Delegate Barnes voted for Delegate 
Hayes. The buance of the cigarmakers' dele- 
gation voted for their colleague. Delégate 
Gompers was elected by the following vote: 
Gompers, 12,088 votes; Hayes, 41959 votes. 

The only other contest for officers was for 
Third Vice-President. Vice-President O'Connell 
of the Machinists' Union was opposed by Dele- 
gate Johnston of the same organization. Dele- 
gates Gompers. Fitzgerald and Tracy voted for 
CVConnelL Delegates Barnes and Mueller voted 
for Johnston. All the other officers were elected 
without opposition. 

The íoüowlng officers were elected for the 
year 1912-18: 

Samuel Gompers, President (Cigarmaker). 

James Duncan, First Vice-President (Granite 
Cutter). 

John Mitchell, Second Vice-President (United 
Mine Worker). 



James O'Connell. Third Vice-President (Ma- 
chinist). ,^, 

D. A. Hayes, Fourth Vice-President (Glass 
Bottle Blower). _ 

William D. Ruber, Fifth Vice-President (Car- 
penter). 

Jos. F. Valentine, Sixth Vice-President (Iron 
Holder) . 

John R/ Alpine, Seventh Vice-President 
(Plumber). 

Henry B. Perham, Eighth Vice-President 
(Railroad Telegrapher). 

John B. Lennon, Treasurer (Journeyman 
Tailor). 

Frank Morrison, Secretary (Printer). 

Seattle, Wash., was elected as the city In 
which to hold the next convention. 

From all points of view the thirty-second an- 
nuel convention of the American Federation of 
Labor was the most Intensely Interesting and 
constructive of any convention ever held by the 
A. F. of L. or perhaps of any other general trade 
union movement anywhere. The oread th and 
scope of the questions considered were remark- 
able and will impress themselves upon our time 
and make for the future progress and welfare 
of the toilers and of all our people. 

We cannot too strongly urge upon the mem- 
bership that they secure copies of the official 
printed proceedings of 420 pages. All the re- 
ports of the officers and of committees are print- 
ed therein, as are many features of the debates 
upon important subjects. The cost Is 25 cents 
per copy. Send to Frank Morrison, Ouray Bldg., 
Washington, D. C. 

Thanking the membership for the honor con- 
ferred upon us in selecting us as delegates to 
the A. F. of L. convention, we have the honor 
to remain. 

Tours fraternally, 

SAMUBL GOMPERS, 
THOMAS F. TRACT, 
J. MAHLON BARNES, 
PHIL. H. MUELLER, 
W. H. FITZGERALD, 
Delegates to A. F. of L. 



CORRESPONDENCE 



Council Bluffs, la., Feb. 27, 1913. 
Mr. G. W. Perkins- 
Dear Sir: According to your construc- 
tion of Sec. 106 in this month's Journal, 
you state that members having neglected 
to pay percentage on their loan for three 
weeks after standing suspended from all 
benefits except death benefit, that they 
stand suspended from the union. 

If that is the case, we have misunder- 
stood that section, members thinking that 
suspension from benefits was the penalty 
ontil they paid up in full their loans. I 
was not notified of said section until about 
the middle of January, and read and noti- 
fied the members and likewise at the Feb- 
ruary meeting. Since then they have paid 
their loan percentage, but, according to the 
above construction, they stand suspended. 
Please let me know as soon as possible 
what action I may take. Surely suspen- 
sion in that light does not seem right and 
I ask you for information what action I 
may take in the matter, as the members are 
willing to pay their percent. 

One member having been out of work 
since January 18, not having paid his per 



cent on loan, is he entitled to out of work 
benefit? 

He wants the benefits and claims he did 
not know that section had passed. I was 
not able to see him until he had been laid 
off. 

P. H. Heuermann. 



March 5, 1913. 
Mr. P. H. Heuermann, Secy. Union 177, 

Council Bluffs. Iowa: 

Dear Sir: Replying to yours in reference 
to the case of members refusing to pay 
their per cent on loans, let me say if you 
and the members have misunderstood the 
law the suspension of these members 
should not be enforced until after the time 
you received or read my letters in the Jour- 
nal explaining the law. In the case you 
cite you need not suspend these members 
if they continue paying weekly on their 
loans since receipt • of the February Jour- 
nal. Simply place them on the non-bene- 
ficial list. 

In the case of the member who has been 
out of work since January 18th he is not 
entitled to out of work benefit provided he 



14 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFPICřAL JOURNAL 



worked any time after the receipt of my 
circular notifying you that the amendments 
had been adopted, and refused to pay per 
cent on his loans. 

Yours fraternally, 

G. W. Perkins, «Int. Pres. 



Barre, Vt., March 1, 1913. 
Mr. G. W, Perkins: 

Dear Sir: Will you please answer a cou- 
ple of questions in relation to the out-of- 
work benefit? 

We have a member that started on the 
out-of-work Jan. 18th and drew three 
weeks' benefit, ending Feb. 1st, 8th and 
15th respectively; then he worked two 
weeks and was again laid off March 1st. 

Will this member have to be on the out- 
of-work list two weeks before drawing his 
first week's benefit again? 

And is he entitled to them or six weeks' 
benefit (providing he continues out of 
work) before he starts on the seven weeks 
no benefit period? 

Hoping to receive an early reply, 
Yours respectfully, 

Wesley Hoffman, Secy. 



March 5, 1913. 
Mr. Wesley Hoffman, Secy. Union 371, 

Barre, Vt.: 

Dear Sir: Replying to yours, let me say 
where a member draws three weeks* out-of- 
work benefit and then works two weeks 
and is again laid off, he has to sign the first 
six days without benefit, or twelve days, 
before he is entitled to the first one week's 
benefit. He then completes his original 
term of six weeks. You will find by reference 
to Section 119 of the Constitution that it 
says, "Any member obtaining employment 
before receiving six weeks* benefit, who 
shall be discharged from employment be- 
fore eight weeks have elapsed, shall be en- 
titled to the balance of the benefit." This 
applies to and means the balance of this 
six weeks' benefit. 

Yours fraternally, 

G. W. Perkins, Int. Pres. 



Montreal, March 3, 1913. 
Mr. G. W. Perkins, Int. Pres.: 

Dear Sir: Your replies to the different 
secretaries in connection with the law gov- 
erning the repayment of loans, and pub- 
lished in the February Journal, were the 
subject of discussion at the last regular 
meeting of our Executive Board. In one 
instance you say the law is drastic, etc., 
and in the case of H. E. Turner you say 
the law does not apply to him. Since the 
Secretary of Union 4Ä2 wrote you on the 



22a of January last, and states then that 
Mr. Turner has paid but $2 in over two 
years' time, it is plainly evident that Mr. 
Turner did not comply with the new law 
and consequently is suspended from receiv- 
ing any further loans until all of the $20 
that he owed are repaid, as well as sus- 
pended from all other benefits, and, wish- 
ing to travel, is certainly not entitled to a 
clean card. Unless you mean to say he is 
altogther suspended from the organization, 
or that all those who owed loans prior to 
January 1st do not come under the law; 
then, if this is what you mean, they can 
continue paying as in the past and the new 
law will not bother them in any way, and 
neither will it bother the local unions de- 
linquent in the collection of loans. From 
their understanding of these replies, the 
members of the board are inclined to the 
belief that the International Office is not 
in sympathy with the law as it now stands, 
and I have been instructed to ask the fol- 
lowing question: Will the International 
Office insist, through the Financiers, on 
all local unions enforcing this law — that is 
to say, "will local union paying benefits to 
members delinquent in the payment of 
loans be called to account for said illegal 
benefits? 

Another question I am requested to ask 
is: Should we charge $5 initiation to those 
suspended prior to January 1st? 

Awaiting an early reply, 
I remain, 

Yours fraternally, 

A. Gariepy, 
Sec. Union No. 58. 



March 7, 1913. 
Mr. A. Gariepy, Secy. Union 58, Montreal, 

Canada: 

Dear Sir: Replying to yours, let me say 
the decision in the Turner case has abso- 
lutely no bearing except on the Turner 
case. You or the members seem to misun- 
derstand the ruling in the Turner case. 
You must remember that the alleged of- 
fense or negligence of Mr. Turner occurred 
in 1911 and 1912. The secretary did not 
say that Mr. Turner had violated any of 
the provisions of the loaning system since 
January 1st, 1913. 

The law will be rigidly enforced, and ex- 
ceptions are only made prior to the re- 
ceipt of the Journal and the new constitu- 
tion. You must remember that the voting 
time on the amendments was during the 
entire month of December. After that we 
had to codify the law, and consequently 
the new constitutions could not be placed 
in the hands of the members until some 



CIGAK MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



15 



time in February. In the January and Feb- 
ruary Journals and by circular I explained 
the new law. No member should be harshly 
dealt with prior to the receipt of official 
notice that the laws had been amended. 
From the time of the receipt of the Feb- 
ruary Journal and the constitution there is 
no excuse. 

The $5 initiation fee applies to any. rein- 
stated member on rejoining regardless of 
when he was suspended. 
Yours fraternally, 

G. W. Perkins, Int. Pres. 



March 7, 1913. 
Mr. W. C. Halbleib, Secy. Union 34, Chip- 
pewa Falls, Wis.: 

Dear Sir: Replying to yours in reference 
to my reply to Union 208, published in the 
February Journal, wherein I say "Section 
69" let mc say this was a typographical 
error. Section 67 is the one that applies 
to reinstated members and the Journal 
should have stated Section 67. Otherwise 
the case is correctly stated. 
Yours fraternally, 

G. W. Perkins, Int. Pres. 



March 5, 1913. 
Mr. Geo. Levy, Secy. Union 236, Reading, 

Pa.: 

Dear Sir: Replying to yours of the 28th, 
in which you state that you perriiitted the 
voting on amendments to the constitution 
to take place in three different places and 
that such balloting was in the hands of the 
election committee, I have to say the vote 
taken under these circumstances is illegal 
and unconstitutional. Fortunately, how- 
ever, your vote does not make any differ- 



ence on any of the propositions voted upon. 
Voiir union can only vote upon any ques- 
tion affecting the International Union at 
a regular or special meeting of the union 
and where all of the machinery of the 
union is in operation, such as the Presi- 
dent, Financial Secretary, Recording Sec- 
retary, Sergeant-at-Arms, and a quorum 
of the union is present. 
Yours fraternally, 

G. W. Perkins, Int. Pres. 



Feb. 12, 1913. 
Fellow-craftsmen: 

We have neither the right nor the power 
to prevent daily papers advertising non- 
union cigars, when we do not own them 
in whole or in part. But there is a daily 
paper in which some of our fellow-mem- 
bers and some local unions own shares of 
stock. It is fair to ask them why they do 
not protest against that paper advertising 
cigars which we are expending thousand« 
of dollars to drive out of the market. 
That paper claims to be one of the only 
simon-pure working class papers. Its sup- 
porters raised quite a howl some years 
ago when by accident a non-union adver- 
tisement appeared in "The Federationist," 
which the editor was legally bound to keep 
in until the contract expired. 

What is the name of the paper? "The 
Milwaukee Leader." The cigars are the 
Cremo, Tom Moore, Henry George and 
over a dozen others. 

How plainly they can see the mote in 
the other fellow's eye. Let them look and 
they will find a beam in their own. 
Fraternally, 

Nick Carte. 



9M ^entfitlanb. 

SMe folgenben ©eriáte über Soonbetoegun* 
gen finb htm ,Xàbaîax6eitex" entnommen: 

Ä OJ) en í agen. 2Bte berid^tet tourbe, 
finb bte îttbûlarbetter (Cigarreninbuftrie) in 
cinc fio^nbctoegung eingetreten. ®<tmmíUci§c 
mit ben bônifqen gabnřanten abgefd^Ioffencn 
©ertrage finb can 1. Çcbruar geřiinbigt toorben. 

XitCliietmng* 

Sloiterbatn, ^orbred^t unb ®o« 
r i n Ä e n. ¡3n bief en brei Orten befittben fi* 
bie xobafaxDeiter im Shmpft. SBeâen biefeS 
Shmpft» lot bod Untemel^mertlum ote organic 
firte XoBcdûxbeiterfd^aft amn 15. gfebruor ge^ 
fihibigi tkt bie Äuöfperrung angebroÇt tft, 
ift jcber Smîmô «û<Î Çoffanb gu mciben. É. 
wxé^manti, 9dceiâx. 

S n B et d$. ^ei ber ffitma ®eBr. (Sid^l^om 
fatten hit Arbeiter toegcn ber enormen Säeue^ 
rungíDerlItoniffe um eine fio^naulage erfud^t. 
2)ie girma toar berftänbig genug unb betoiuigtc 



1 ©orte 20 ¥iö- ûuf 3 ©orten 30 Sßfg.. 

m. auf 1 ©orte 70 çfg. 
uno auf 1 ©orte 1 Sff Í, pro SWitte für jHotter. 




4 ©orten 50 



S)en SBtáelmad&ern tourbe betoilïtgt auf 8 ©or* 
ten 10 ¥fg. unb auf 2 ©orten 20 ^fg. pro 
S^ille. Suit IBerl^atiblungen mit ber grtrma tour^ 
ben burd^ bie Bauleitung gefübrt. 

ginftertoalbc. SWit ber girma díiá^. 
ïïiat^, mit ber fd^on ein £o]^ntarift)e^äItniS 
unterhalten toirb, tonnte eine erneute SŽerctn* 
barung getroffen unb alô 3^a^ im 2!arif auf^ 
genommen toerben: S>ie girma getool^tt i^fe* 
tijren SCrbeitem unb Slrbeiterinnen in icbem 
3a]^re gericn für bie S>auer tjon fed^S Zvhtitó^ 
tagen. S>ie Šerien^eii toirb mit bem Sbixtíbif 
fd^itiStooc^ent^erbtenft bon ber girma beaa^lt. 
^e SBerl^anblungen tourDen mit bem Bauleiter 
geführt. 

95 äff um. Sbit girma iöol^ro ^ot eine 
aWaferegelung borgenommen unb ift bcStoegen 
ber ©etrieb geff errt. ÄoIIegen, bie bort in Ar* 
beit treten toouen, toerben gebeten, fid^ tjor^er 



16 



CIGAE MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOUKNAL 



an £). $ape, TlühUvúDta, au mení)en. TlÜQiíit^ 
ber, bit o§ne öorgcriac yuftimmuna Arbeit on* 
nesmetl, öergel^cn fi^ flcgen bie «Jcrbanbêin* 
icrcpen. 

Stuttgart. 9Bir bertd^teten an biefer 
Stelle über einen ^artfabfd^Iu^ mit ber ,XabaU 
arbeitcríQJcnoffenfd^aft 2:. ?í. @„ c. ®. m. b. 
Q/. Äeiber muffen tüir l^eute berid^ten, ba^ 
biefer l^Bertraa nimt ^uftanbe îam, ha ber ^uf^ 
fid^târat)^ biefed â3etrtebei^ jid^ meigerte, ben 
©ertrag, ber mit ber ®efd5âftèleitung berein» 
bar^ mar, su genel^migen. SDtefe ^trma tft aviS 
htm Jöe^ugSquettenbcraeid^nio tanftreuer JJir* 
men au Itreidgen. 

Sâei^enfelê. 2)ie girma ^. ®, maU 
tbiaS toetgert fid^ nod^ immer, bie 2oi^nfi unb 
Slrbeiteberbältniffe mit unferer Drganifation ^u 
regeln. Ssor guaug nadp biefer girma toirb 
beSl^alb geiuarnt. ä^ttglieber, bie o^ne ^u^ 
ftimmung nada SSBet^enfeli? reifen ober imiaie^ 
§en, erl^alten leine Unterftü^una. 

Çfunqftabt. S)ie gtrma aWaj ^reunb 
l^at bie eingegangene SBerpflidĎtung, bte om 
©treu betl^eiligten Slrbeiter in ^fungftabt toie* 
ber einauftellen, nod§ nid^t erfüUi. 

5Bon ber ^ûmburgijd^en Sigar# 
rcninbuftnie. S>em „S^axtib, gremben^î 
bltttt" toirb gefd^rieben: „®8 tft nid^t leidet, ein 
Urtl^eil über bie augenblidlid^e 2age ber l^om«" 
burgijid^cn (Sigarreninbuftrie ju getoinnen. SDie 
UrtÇeile ber einzelnen gabrifanten lauten red^t 
berfd^teben. 9Bte fd^on ):eaelmäJ3ig feit @in« 
fü^rung bed S^abal^olleê unb ber ftetig fteigen^ 
ben greife für i;toíltabaí erf^einen bei ben gro^ 
6en !a|)itauräftigen gobrilen, bie mit einem 
berbältnidma^ig größeren $[uftuanb bon fßttf 
faufiSperfonal arbeiten rönnen, unb fid^ feit 
garren eines feften DîenommeS erfreuen, bie 
Srgebntffe audâ loäl^renb ber l^inter und liegen«« 
ben abónate günftiger als bei ben Heineren unb 
mittleren gfabrifanten. ^m ganaen genommen 
mar bie SBefd^aftipung angeticqtS ber A^atfad^e, 
ba^ eS fid^ imt bte ftets gefd^äftlid^ fd^mäd^eren 
(Sommers* unb ^erbftmonate l^anbelt, nod^ leib^ 
lid^, iebcnfallS aber fd^mad^er als bei ber füb* 
beutfd^en ©igarrcninbuftrie, bie i^ren befferen 
@)efmâftSgang aud^ burd^ il^re ftarlen einlaufe 
auf htm beutfd^cn Siabaïmarite erreid^t. 2)ie 
äBertl^fteuer mirb axu>auttnb aux 93enad^t^eili' 
gung oer mebr überfeeifc^e XcSbcdt berarbeiten« 
Den norbbeutfd^en ßiigarreninbuftrie, unb in bie^ 
fer mieber Aum S'iadÇtl^eil ber mentgcr íapttal* 
řraftigen tjûbri!anten. Auf einen 9tüigang 
ber Keinen Çabriïanten toeift aud^ bie foeben er^ 
fd^ienene ©tatiÇtiï ber S)eutfd&en ířabařberufS* 
©cnoffenfdj^aft für baS ^abr 1911 l^in, bie einen 
SÄüagang in ber Sal^I ber gabrüanten, aber eine 

Žiunal^me in ber ga^I ber befd&äftigtcn ©ollar* 
citer aufjoeift. Sùccntbtn bleibt ber îTbbrud^, 
ben bie Éigarette ber (bigarre tbut, anbouemb 
beftel^en, ja, er ftetgert ficäg nod^. SMe gunaj^me 
beS ©igarettenïonfimtS im Stcd^nungSial^r 
1911/12 bctnig gegen baS JBorjaCr nidöt mem* 
ger als 12% $roacnt, bei einer läl^rlid^en 95e* 
boïïerungSaunaijme bon 2 ?ßroaent. Äudö bte 
Si^l^euerung ber SebcnSmittel bürfte baau beige* 
tragen "^oSbtn unb femer boau beitragen, ba% 
fidö bie (Stgarreninbuftrie nid^t günftiger ent* 
toitfelt. 3:!abaï ift eben ein ©enufemtttet, an 



bem auerft mit gefpart mirb, . tocnn ®elbman* 
gel in ber SBeböuferung borl^anben ift. Stnber* 
feits treibt eine fold^e ©ituotion crfal^rungSge* 
mäfe bie 9íaudí}er oudĎ bon ber ©igarre a^r 
Cigarette, bie in SBirrlidèfeit amar bie tl^eurerc 
gorm beS lAaud^gcnufîeS ift, aber meil fie in 
öuantcn gu Heineren iöetrögcn eingeïauft mirb, 
bem imcrfal^renen S'iaud^cr ein biUtgcreS dïau* 
d^en borfpiegelt." 



9tuS bett betttfitett (Skmetffitfaftett. 

2)ie Slbredjnung beS ©öttÄer* 
18 e r b a n b e S für baS 3. Quartal ergab eine 
einnal^me bon 61,735 m., ber eine SíuSgabe 
bon 45,634 M. gegenüberftcBt. ©on ben SuS* 
gaben entfielen u. a. auf ArbeitSlofen^Unter* 
ftüfeung 5127 mi, ^anîtn * Unterftüfeung 
16,437 3RI unb auf meife^Unterftüfeung 1014 
SKř. S)er ©ermögenSbeftanb betrug 152,639 
3War!. 

2)er ©ad^bedfer * ©erbanb berein* 
nabmte im 4. Quartal 70,772 Tll unb bcrauS* 
gabte 73,852 2KÍ. S>ie StuSgaben für ©tretíS 
unb gemaferegelte SWitglieber ergaben bie (5imi* 
me bon 57,656 TlU für ^aníen^Unterftüfeung 
mürben 2427 SWÍ. berauSgabt. Sbtz Äaffcnbe* 
ftanb betrug 112,461 m. 

S^er ©erbanb ber ©anblungS* 
g e ]^ i I f cn aäl^Ite am ©d^Iuff e beS lefeten gal^^ 
res 18,489 2«itglicbcr gegen 15,502 au 8c* 
ginn beS ^a^rcS 1912. ®urd^ ben Ucbertritt 
ber Sagerpalter am 1. ííanuar 1913 ift bie 
SWitglieberaal^l auf runb 21,000 geftiegen. 

S>ie 9(bredBnung beS ©erbanbeS 
ber ^oraeïianarbeiter für boS 4. 
Quartal ergicbt einen Slaffcnbeftanb bon 228,* 
445 SKf. SJoau !ommen bie ©eftanbe ber fioïal* 
unb dJaufaffen, fo ba^ ein ^efammtbcrmogen 
beS ©crbanbeS bon 251,101 2Äf. borfianben 
mar. S>ie SWitglieberaa^l betrug am (od^luffe 
beS 3. Quartals 16,203. 

2)er ©erbattb ber SIcstilarbei* 
ter beranftaltet aur ^txt Srbebungen über bie 
Sobnberiältniffe in ber 2:eîtiltnbuftrie. ©erettS 
in ben Sauren 1909 unb 1911 finb gïcid^artige 
©rl^ebungen beranftaltet morben, fo bofe ber* 
gletd^bareS Stffemmatcrial auS früheren $$aB* 
ren bor^anben ift. $)ic iefet borgimebmenbe 
llnterfudgung ift jebod^ erl^eoltd^ beretnfodçt. €S 
finb im ®egenJaB a« ben bciben früheren (5r* 
l^ebungen, bte fidj auf baS ganae ^al^r crftred* 
ten, nur 4 ©tid^mod&en borgefel^en morben. ÎHe 
crfte ©rÇebung finbet am 15. ^ebruor ftott. 
S)urd5 bte ©ereinfad^img bürfte eine gtöfterc 
©etl^eiligung ber SWitgïieber a« crmarten fein. 

^xt Stbrcd^nung beS î^ranSport* 
arbeiter*©erbanbeS für baS britte 
Quartal fd^liefet mit einem SWttglieberbelïanb 
tjon 219,982 unb einem ^atiptïaffenbcftanb bon 
1,575,503 m, gür Unterftüfeungen mürben 
306,312 aW!. berauSgabt, babon für «rbettS* 
lofeniUnterftüfeung 64,409 Tll unb Äranlen* 
Unterftü^ung 199,770 SK!. S>ie ßol^nbcmegun* 
gen unb ©treiřS erforbcrten eine ÄuSgabe bon 
125,718 mt, S5te Filialen bgtten einen Äof* 
fenbcftanb bon 1,033,894 m— (©orrefpon* 
benablatt.) 



CIGAR \fAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



It 



Hnuti řemeslných unií nepotřebuje žádné 
obrany; nepotřebuje se proč omlouvat. Ono 
prokázalo svoji užitečnost zlepšením podmí- 
nek životních, zkrácením doby pracovní, usi- 
lováním' o zlep&ení zdravotního stavu, přiči- 
něním se o to, by práce byla více respekto- 
vána a obecné mínění bylo nakloněno spra- 
vedlivé věci. 



¿emeslné unie nepožadují žádných zvlášt- 
ních privilejí; ony neusilují o zákonodárstvo, 
jež by nebylo prospěSno celému okolí. Jakožto 
nejdůležitější činitel v průmyslovém úle po- 
žadují zákonitý podíl ochrany a podporování 
svých zájmů. 

Dělnické třídy, jako jednotlivci jsou bez- 
mocný; jsou tak bezmocný jako loď na roz- 
bouřeném moři bez kompasu a kormidla. 
Spojeny v řemeslné unie, pod schopným a 
poctivým vůdcovstvím, ovládají sílu, jež stále 
vzrůstá jak v počtu tak finančních prostřed- 
cích. 



fiemeslné unie ve svých nejprvnějších po- 
čátcích dožily se mnohých zklamání násled- 
kem nízkých příspěvků a laciného řízení, což 
bylo dosti dobrým v čase míru, rozhodně vsak 
se neosvědčilo v pohnutých dobách. (The 
Industrial Banner.) 

Organizace jest prvním činitejem ve vývinu 
moderního průmyslu; ona směřuje k vzdělání 
dělníků v hospodářských otázkách týkajících 
se jejich zájmů. Bez organizace dělníci stali 
by se kořisti nesvědomitých továrníků, a ne- 
mohli by účinně odporovati snižování mzdy a 
nepříznivým podmínkám v dílnách. 

r 

Dobře provětrávaná továrna, s hojností čer- 
stvého vzduchu a slunečního světla, slouží 
k zachováni zdraví a tělesné síly. Doutníkář- 
ská dílna bez moderního zdravotního zařízení 
jest pařeništěm souchotin, obecně zvaných 
** bílým morem '\ Dobrý Čistý vzduch uchrá- 
ní před lékařskými účty. 

Nejvyšší soud státu New Jersey uznal ú- 
stavnost zákona o náhradách dělníkům, jenž 
začal býti prováděn r. 1911. Soud potvrdil 
rozsudek ve prospěch Alidy Sexton-ové proti 
New York District Telegraph Company, při- 
řknuv ji týdenní náhrady $7.27 po tři sta 
týdnů, za ztrátu jejího manžela, jenž byl za- 
bit elektrickým proudem, když společností 
onou byl zaměstnán. 



Výroba doutníků, vážících více než tři libry 
tisíc, ve druhém a třetím okrsku vnitrozemní 
daně v New York City, za něž zaplacena byla 
daň za měsíc leden 1913, obnášela 54,848,620 
kusů. Za tentýž měsíc v roce 1912 daně za- 
placeny byly za 47,244,210 kusů, což při po- 
rovnání ukazuje vzrůst výroby o 7,604,410 
doutníků. 

Výroba- doutníků ve váech distriktech vni- 
trozemní daně, vážících více než 3 libry tisíc, 
za něž daň zaplacena byla v měsíci* lednu 



1913, obnášela 588,680.183 kusů. Za tentýž 
měsíc r. 1912 daně zaplaceny byly za 519,- 
647,260 kusu,což při porovnání ukazuje vzrůst 
výroby o 69,032,923 doutníků. 

Výroba malých doutníků, vážících méně než 
tři libry tisíc, za něž zaplacena byla vnitro- ' 
zemní daů po 75c, za měsíc leden 1913 obná- 
šela 86,012,840. Za tentýž měsíc r. 1912 daně 
zaplaceny byly ze 97,948,920, což ukazuje 
zmenšení výroby malých doutníků o 11,936,080 
kusů. 



Rakousko. — Unie domácích služebníků vy« 
dávají nyní měsíčník s přílohou 'Pro mládež.' 
(Adresa: Vereinsblatt, Weggasse 25, Vienna 
VI.) — Vláda podá parlamentu předlohu za po- 
vinné ustanovení municipálních jednatelen 
pro byty v jistých okrscích. Domácí bude 
nucen oznámiti, když bude míti prázdný byt 
a opět když jej pronajme, takže obecní úřad 
bude moci podávati informace hledatelům by- 
tů a bude moci pravidelně uveřejňovati se- 
znam prázdných bytů. — ^Petice opatřená více 
než 10,000 podpisy zaslána byla parlamentu 
pekařskou unií, se žádostí, by vláda zdokona- 
lila svoji předlohu na ochranu dělníků při 
tomto řemesle, jež se nyní nalézá před sně- 
movnou. — Nový spolčovací zákon, jenž přijat 
byl vládním parlamentem, který však ještě 
musí projíti hořejší sněmovnou, dává poprvé 
ženám právo přistupovati k politickým spol- 
kům. 



Jako Škola pro praktické poučení, schůze 
řemeslných unií prokázaly mnohých služeb 
pracovním třídám; poskytují poučení v par- 
lamentárním jednání; vyvinují přirozené 
schopnosti při debatováni a rozšiřují obzor 
o hospodářských' a sociálních otázkách. 

Průměrný kapitalista představuje lako- 
most a hrabivost převládající v moderním 
průmyslovém světě. Jeho přirozené sympatie 
utopeny jsou v moři prospěchářství a v touze 
po penězích a moci; nedbá v jak žalostném 
postavení se nalézá vdova a sirotci. On jest 
záhubou blahobytu přítomné a budoucích ge- 
nerací. 



Překážky, jež obklopují řádný a zdravý roz- 
voj hnutí řemeslných unií, spočívají částečně 
ve strachu z propuštění, násilnictví, ntečnosti, 
lhostejnosti, sobectví, nevědomosti atd. K 
odstranění těchto překážek jest zapotřebí ne- 
ustálé vzdělávací kampaně. Prospěch vyplý- 
vající z organizace má býti vysvětlován v se- 
;;oně i mimo ni. 

Vzájemné dobročinné oddělení Bratrstva 
železničních telegrafistů je založeno na assess- 
mentové stupnici pro následující pojistky: 

Na $300 (Třída A) řočně $2.40 

Na $500 (Třída B) '* 3.60 

Na $1000 (Třída C) * ' 7.20 

úmrtní pojistky zaplacené do 31. července 
1912 obnášely $821,581.47. 

Nesmírné zisky průmyslových korporací v 



18 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



odporu 8 hubenými mzdami placenými nezku- 
šeným dělníkům, ženám a dětem, tvoři tma- 
vou skvrnu v našem průmyslovém systému. 
Každá stávka vyvolaná neorganizovanými — 
spravedlivé nebo nespravedlivě, správaě či 
nesprávně, ukazuje mocný protest proti ne- 
spravedlivým průmyslovým poměrům. 

Organizováni neorganizovaných, širší duch 
jednoty a bratrství musí býti vštěpován, agi- 
tace našeho mínění a požadavků za naše prá- 
va musí býti vedena, a vzdělávání mass musí 
býti zavedeno. Zde jest práce pro všechny. 



Námezdní dělníci musí bráti podílu na kaž- 
dém hnutí vypočítaném ku zlepšení jejich 
vlastních zájmů, aneb proti nešvaru, jenž vy- 
rostl ze spojení se kapitálu; musí býti odváž- 
nými i trpělivými, výbojnými ale opatrnými; 
oni musí zakládati své organizace na pev- 
ných základech a říditi je obchodnicky, a 
jest nejvýše d uleží to pro bezpečnost námezd- 
ních aelníků a společnost, aby ženské dělnice 
byly organizovány a tak chráněny proti zne- 
mravuu jícím vlivům, jež obyčejně provází 
přepracování, přílišné hodiny a nedostatečná 
výživa. 

Napomenutí Wendella Philipse nemůže býti 
dosti zdůrazněno: '^ Organizujte se a stůjte 
při sobě! Dejte národu slyšeti o spojeném 
požadavku dělnického hlasu." 

Počet dělnických smluv se zaměstnavateli 
v Německu, jež byly v platnosti 1. ledna 1910, 
byl 6,667, a vztahoval se na 138,785 dílen a 
1,139,974 dělníků, kdežto 31. prosince podob- 
ných smluv bylo 8,293, vztahujících se na 
173,727 závodů a 1,361,086 dělníků. Mezi 
těmito kandidáty 3,240 smluv vypršelo a 
4,866 vešlo v platnost. 

Zde může býti pouze jedna otázka ohledni 
zmenšení počtu pracovních hodin pro ženy, a 
to jest blaho pokroku lidstva. Pohodlí za- 
městnavatele aneb některého závodu nemá se 
do toho míchati a též ochotnost žen pracovati 
dloifhé hodiny nemá v tom hráti žádnou úlo- 
hu. Závod nebo obchod, jenž závisí na po- 
škozování lidskosti k vůli své existenci, má 
býti nejen nechán padnouti, ale má býti zni- 
čen okamžitě. 



La producción de puros en el Distrito de 
Aduanas Interiores de Florida sobre la cual se 
pagaron contribuciones en el mes de enero de 
1913, sumó 25,055,203. En el correspondiente 
mes del año 1911 se pagaron contribuciones 
sobre 19,337,287. Resulta pues una aumenta- 
ción de 5,717,916 pures, comparada la produc- 
ción del mes de enero de 1912 con la del mis- 
mo mes del año anterior. 

* * * 

í.o que á continuación copiamos está sacado 
de la "International News Letter": 

"Kspaña -Los pintores de Madrid se en- 
cuentran entre los pocos gremios que trabajen 
solo ocho horas al día. Establecida en 1899, 



la organización desde 1902 ha gozado de la 
jornada de ocho horas. El primer aumento de 
los salarios de 3,50 á 3,85 pesetas por día se 
obtuvo en 1905 sin huelga. Otro aumento de 
25 céntimos se obtuvo en 1911 después de una 
huelga de cuatro semanas. Poco después, sin 
embargo, 800 entre los 1,000 miembros de la 
organización se encontraron "locked-out" Los 
obreros perdieron pero ha recuperado la or- 
ganización desde esa época. Hoy día, los pin- 
tores reciben seis pesetas y sus ayudantes 3,50 

por jornada de ocho horas de trabajo." 

* * * 

La organización es el primer factor en el 
desarrollo industrial moderne; su tendencia es 
de educar á los trabajadores en cuestiones eco- 
nómicas que afectan sus intereses. Sin organi- 
zación, los salariados pronto, serian la presa de 
los manufactureros sin escrúpulos, por encon- 
trarse incapacitados para resistir con éxito á 
las reducciones de salarios que se les impusiera 
y á las malas condiciones que no dejarían de 

existir en los talleres. 

* * * 

La Unión de Gremios no pide privilegio espe- 
cial ninguno; no insiste sobre leyes que no 
sean provechosas para la comunidad entera. 
Como factor importantísimo de la colmena in- 
dustrial, lo que sí demanda, es su parte legí- 
tima de protección y el adelanto de sus in- 
tereses. 

* * * 

Las clases obreras, en tanto que individuos, 
se encuentran impotentes, tan impotentes como 
un barco en alto mar sin compás ni timón. 
Unidas en uniones de gremios, bajo jefes cpm- 
petentes y honrados, obtienen una fuerza que 
aumenta de intensidad y de potencia en pro- 
porción directa del aumento permanente de 

sus miembros y de sus recursos monetarios. 

* * « 

Una fábrica bien ventilada, t:on bastante aire 
fresco y bastante luz natural, preserva la salud 
y el vigor del cuerpo. Una fábrica de tabacos 
desprovista de instalaciones sanitarias moder- 
nas es una criadera de tuberculosis, enferme- 
dad terrible que generalmente se llama *ia 
plaga blanca." El aire puro y fresco economi- 
za muchos honorarios de médico. 

* « * 

El movimiento de uniones de gremios no 
necesita ser defendido; no tiene que presen- 
tar excusas. Ha probado ya lo necesario que 
es, al elevar la manera de vivir; al reducir 
las horas de trabajo; al insistir sobre un me- 
joramiento de las condiciones del taller; al 
hacer respetar á la labor y al fomentar un 
sentimiento público en favor de una justicia 

social más elevada. 

« ♦ * 

Los anales del Unionismo de Gremios, desde 
que tomó forma el movimiento, ostentan los 



CIGAE MAKEBS* OFFICIAL JOUBNAL 



19 



fracasos de instituciones débiles y de fortuna 
que muy bien pocjían prosperar en tiempo de 
paz pero que resultaron completamente inade- 
cuadas en horas de peligro y de tempestad. 

* * * 

El Departamento de Beneficio Mutuo de la 
Brotherhood of Railroad Telegraphers, ó Her- 
mandad de Telegrafistas de Ferro-carril, tiene 
como base una tarifa de imposiciones sobre 
los beneficios siguientes: 

Por año 

Sobre $ 300 (Série A) $2.40 

Sobre $ 500 (Série B) 3.60 

Sobre $1000 (Série C) 7.20 

Las sumas pagadas por fallecimientos hasta 

el 31 de Julio de 1912 sumaron $821,r)81.47. 

* * * 

Eo la generalidad de los casos, el capitalista 
representa la codicia y la rapacidad que pre- 
valen en la arena industrial moderna. Sus 
simpatías naturales se ahogan en el océano 
de avaricia y en el deseo vehemente que abri- 
ga de dinero y de poder; no le importa la 
angustia de la viuda y del huérfano. Ese 
hombre es una amenaza para el bienestar de 

la generación presente y de las futuras. 

« « * 

La Corte Suprema del Estado de Nuevo 
Jersey ha sostenido la constitucionalidad de 
la ley de compensación del obrero, que entró 
en vigor en 1911. La Corte sostuvo una deci- 
sión reconociendo á Alida Sexton un verdicto 
contra la Cia de Telégrafos del Distrito de 
Nueva York, concediéndole $7.27 por semana 
durante trecientas semanas, por la muerte de 
su esposo, muerto por un choque eléctrico 
mientras desempeñaba su profesión de tele- 
grafista en el empleo de la mencionada compa- 
ñía. 

* * * 

Como escuela de educación práctica, la unión 
de gremios ha proporcionado por medio de ^us 
reuniones servicios inapreciables á las clases 
trabajadoras, proporcionándoles Instrucción en 
procedimientos parlamentarios ; desarrollando 
sus capacidades naturales en las discusiones 
públicas y ensanchando su horizonte en cues- 
tiones económicas y sociales. 

* * * 

Los provechos enormes de las corporaciones 
mdustriales en contraste con los magros sala- 
ríos que se pagan á los obreros in experimen- 
tados, á las mujeres y á los niños, constituyen 
una mancha vergonzosa en nuestro sistema in- 
dustrial moderno. Cada huelga iniciada por 
los obreros sin organización, con razón ó sin 
razón, con justicia ó sin justicia, en tiempo 
oportuno ó no, presenta una protesta formi- 
dable contra las condiciones de lalior malas y 

dañinas. 

« « « 

Los obstáculos que impiden á la marcha or- 



denada y saludable del movimiento de las 
uniones de gremios, se deben en parte al mie- 
do de ser despedidos, á la intimidación, á la 
apatía, indiferencia, egoísmo, ignorancia, etc. 
Para sobrepasar estos obstáculos, es necesaria 
una campaña continua de educación. Los be- 
neficios que se obtienen de la organización han 

sido explicados hasta la .saciedad. 

* « « 

Los embarques de tabacos de Cuba á países 
extranjeros en el mes de enero de 1913 suma- 
ron 10,507,393 puros. En el correspondiente 
mes del año anterior, se remesaron 6.137,078; 
resultando pues una aumentación de 4,370,515, 
comparada la exportación del mes de enero 

de 1912 con la del mismo mes del 1911. 

« * * 

Al considerar las uniones de gremios, en pro 
y en contra de ellas, el público inclina dema- 
siado á concentrar la vista sobre los incidentes 
de una crisis en los negocios del gremio, des- 
conociendo, por ser menos ostentatorio, el sa- 
ludable trabajo que se persigue con sosiego y 
con sistema, día tras día y año tras año, con- 
servándose siempre presente como objeto al- 
gún ideal elevado que se puede perder de vista 
por un tiempo en momentos de apuro, pero 
que permanece firme cuando ha pasado el mo- 
mento difícil, para hacerse la roca firme sobre 
la cual la unión que quiere durar ha de ser 
fundada. 

4c * * 

Los propósitos fundamentales de las uniones 
de gremios siempre han sido y continúan sien- 
do la reducción de las horas de trabajo y la 
aumentación de los salarios. El advenimiento 
de estos ideales han ocasionado una revolu- 
ción completa en la vida diaria de un sin 
número de salariados. Obreros que antes nc 
tenían tiempo para otra cosa, sino su trabajo, 
comer y dormir, ahora lo tienen para perfec- 
cionarse intelectualmente y para gozar de un 
recreo saludable y cuerdo, cosas que ambas 
son tan esenciales para la raza humana. 

En la mayoría de los casos, la aumentación 
de los salarios, y la reducción de las horas de 
trabajo han resultado en la oportunidad para 
los salariados de gozar de las cosas mejores 
y más elevadas de la vida, tales como la lec- 
tura de buenos libros, un mejoramiento gene- 
ral de los asuntos domésticos, mayor educa- 
ción para los niños y otras ventajas que son 
absolutamente extrañas para el hombre que 
ha de emplear todn su tiempo para cerrar la 

puerta al hambre. 

« « * 

Ix)s salarios han aumentado bajo la ley de 
trabajo de ocho horas y esta ley ha elevado el 
tono moral de la comunidad en que se ha fo- 
mentado, en lugar de ocasionar, como lo pre- 
tendían muchos, que el obrero gastara más 
tiempo en cantinas. Si se puede tener confian' 



20 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



za en el obrero, dándole la franquizia, asi 
mismo se le podrá dar suñciente tiempo para 
leer y gozar de la vida de familia, desarro 
liando á la vez su naturaleza artística y moral. 

La labor organizada ha sido capaz por 
medio de la acción cooperativa y de los pactos 
colectivos, de nyducir las horas de trabajo, de 
elevar los salarios y en muchos casos, de me- 
jorar las condiciones de labor. 

Todo el mundo quedará de acuerdo que el 
obrero no recibe una porción equitativa de la 
riqueza que se produce; que las horas de tra- 
bajo son demasiadas. 

La labor organizada ha, por la acción co- 
lectiva, sido capaz de obtener jornadas más 
cortas, salarios mejores; de resistir con éxito 
á las reducciones de salarios; de proporcionar 
mejores viviendas, mejores habitaciones, me- 
jor comida, más comodidad para la vida; de 
hacer que el taller sea un lugar más agradable 
para trabajar. 



Règle genérale, le capitaliste représente la 
cupidité et la rapacité de l'arène industrielle 
moderne. Ses sympathies naturelles sont 
étouffées par son avarice, sa soif d'argent et 
de puissance. Que lui fait langoisse de la 
veuve et de l'orphelin? Cet homme est une 
menace pour les générations présentes et fu- 
tures. 

* * * 

La Cour Suprême de l'Etat de New Jersey 
a soutenu la constitutionnalité de la loi de 
compensation des ouvriers, qui est entrée en 
vigueur en 1911. La cour soutint en effet une 
décision allouant à Alida Sexton un verdict 
contre la New York District Telegraph Com- 
pany lui signalant une somme de $7.27 par 
semaine pendant trois cents semaines à cause 
de la mort de son mari, préposé aux lignes de 
télégraphe, qui fut tué par un choc électrique 
pendant qu'il travaillait pour la compagnie. 

* 41 * 

En tant qu'école d'instruction pratique, les 
meetings des unions de métiers ont rendu des 
services inappréciables aux classes ouvrières, 
leur enseignant la procédure parlementaire, dé- 
veloppant leurs capacités naturelles pour les 
débats publics et élargissant leur horizon éco- 
nomique et social. 

41 * 4t 

Les profits énormes des corporations indus- 
trielles, en contraste avec les maigres salaires 
payés aux ouvriers non versés dans leurs mé- 
tiers, aux femmes et aux enfants, sont une 
sombre tache sur l'écusson de notre système 
industriel moderne. Chaque grève instituée 
par les ouvriers organisés, à tort ou à raison, 
juste ou injuste, opportune ou inopportune, 
représente une puissante protestation contre 
les mauvaises conditions industrielles. 



Les obstacles qui retardent le progrès or- 
donné et normal du mouvement des unions de 
métiers, sont dus en partie à la crainte du 
renvoi; à l'intimidation, à l'apathie, à l'indif- 
férence, à l'égoïsme, à l'ignorance, etc. Pour 
surmonter ces obstacles, une campagne con- 
tinue d'éducation est nécessaire. Les bénéfices 
à dériver de l'organisation ont été expliqués 

ici et ailleurs á satiété. 

« * * 

L'Union de Métier. 

Le monde industriel ne comprend pas, n'ap- 
précie pas encore le bien-fondé des déclara- 
■ tions des unions de métiers dans le sens que 
nulle industrie n'a le droit d'exister qui n'est 
pas capable de payer des* salaires permettant 
à l'ouvrier de vivre, et par vivre, nous n'enten- 
dons pas simplement exister. Nous voulons 
dire, de vivre comme des êtrA humains une 
vie qui produise des hommes, des femmes et 
des enfants du type le plus élevé. Cela, et 
bien d'autres choses encore, cause un mécon- 
tentement et une agitation continuels. Nous 
sommes fiers du fait que notre mouvement a 
été le grand facteur qui a remué les masses et 
les a fait penser, les rendant ainsi méconten- 
tes de l'injustice industrielle et les faisant 
ensuite lutter, au moyen des méthodes pra- 
tiques syndicalistes, pour l'abilition de 
cette injustice. Ce mécontentement, 
cette agitation, occasionnés principale- 
ment par les injustices commises contre les 
ouvriers, trouvent un exutoire commode et ré- 
volutionnaire dans l'union de métier. Là ils 
trouvent en effet la force qui a rendu leur 
fardeau plus léger. En elle ils trouvent la fra- 
ternité humaine vraiment pratique qui sans 
cesse travaille pour relever le genre humain. 
Chez elle nous trouvons un champ d'opéra- 
tions qui produit des résultats tangibles et 
visibles, que nous savons de plus être perma- 
nents et efficaces. Nous invitons cordialement 
à tous les travaillettrs, des deux sexes à se 
joindre à nous dans l'union des métiers pour 
l'émancipation graduelle mais sûre des salariés. 

4t 41 * 

Les buts déclarés de l'union des typographes 
sont d'élever la position et de maintenir et 
protéger les intérêts du corps de métier en 
général ; d'établir et soutenir un tarif équitable 
de -salaires et de réglementer toutes les af- 
faires du métier qui intéressent les membres; 
d'influencer le système d'apprentissage dans le 
sens de l'intelligence, de la compétence et de 
l'habileté, dans l'intérêt, aussi bien du patron 
que de l'employé; de soulager les nécessiteux 
méritants et de pourvoir à l'ensevelissement 
décent des membres décédés et, enfin, de s'ef- 
forcer de remplacer les grèves et leurs résul- 
tats inmanquables, qui sont la rancoeur et des 
pertes pécuniaires, par l'arbitrage et la con- 



CIGAE MAKERS^ OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



21 



ciliation dans tous les différents s'élevant au 

sujet des salaires et des conditions du travail. 

« « « 

Limputation si souvent faite' au labeur or- 
ganisé que rétablissement de salaires maxi- 
mum et minimum prive l'employeur de la li- 
berté de payer ses hommes suivant leur habi- 
leté et entrave la culture de la maîtrise per- 
sonnelle dans le corps de métier d'un chacun, 
n'a pas le moindre poids, parce que les établis- 
sements où les organisations du travail sont 
les plus prospères sont généralement trop 
grands pour que le patron y puisse connaître 
rhabileté de tous ses hommes et c'est un fait 
bien connu que la majorité des employeurs 
visent à l'obtention de la plus grande produc- 
tion possible au moindre prix de revient, sans 
s'inquiéter le moins du monde de l'habileté 
individuelle de& ouvriers. 

Une des plus fortes critiques des unions de 
métiers, c'est qu'elles exposent les vices du 
monopole. Il est vrai que le but le plus éle- 
védes différentes organisations est d'induire 
tous les travailleurs de chaque industrie à se 
joindre à l'unbn correspondante, de sorte que, 
en monopolisant les sources du labeur, ils 
puissent ccHitrôler les tarifs des salaires; il 
est vrai de même que des conflits surviennent 
souvent avec les ''jaunes" ou ouvriers non af- 
ñliés, mais d'un autre côté, on fait tous les 
efforts possibles pour que ces non-affiliés se 
joignent aux tmions et une organization qui 
constamment requiert ses concurrents de s'as- 
socier à ses bénéfices ne peut assurément être 
appelée un monopole. 

41 41 * 

"Il était un temps où la Cour de la Chambre 
Etoile était employée en Angleterre de la 
même façon que nos cours le sont à l'heure 
actuelle, pour prohiber l'acte et punir ensuite 
la désobéissance sans jugement avec jury et 
ce, dans tous les cas. La liberté personnelle 
était à la merci du caprice de cette cour, mais 
le peuple anglais ne toléra pas longtemps cet 
abus de la puissance royale. Le peuple abolit 
la cour de la Chambre Etoile et obligea le roi 
à signer le bill des droits. Les principaux 
foadamentaux de la Chancellerie, ou équité, 
que: 

"Premièrement— Elle devait être exercée 
pour la protection des droits de propriété 
seulement. 

"Deuxièmement — Qui vient solliciter son 
aide doit venir les mains propres. 

"Troisièmement — Il ne doit ps^ avoir de 
remède adéquat à la loi. 

"Quatrièmement — Elle ne doit jamais être 
employée pour porter atteinte aux droits d'un 
individu. 

"Cinquièmement— Elle ne doit pas être em- 
ployée pour punir le crime. 

"Si les injuctions qui de nos jours sont 



émises dans les disputes entre patrons et em- 
ployés peuvent subir l'épreuve de ces prin- 
cipes, c'est de la loi que nous aurions alors 
à nous plaindre. Si elles ne peuve'nt passer 
l'épreuve, c'est que nous avons le droit de 
nous plaindre des juges qui, soit par igno- 
rance, soit par un zèle mal entendu pour 
l'ordre public et le travail à bon marché, ont 
mal usé de cette puissance, agissant comme 
des souverains qui font des proclamations au 
peuple." • 



_ _ 'Monday Eve, Dec. 16» 1912. 

To the Officers and Delegates of the Detroit 

Federation of Labor. 

Dear Sirs and Brothers^The following is the 
report of the labor conference held at the resi- 
dence of a reverend gentleman in the interest 
of Cigarmakers' Union No. 22 of Detroit. Mich., 
and Union No. 2 of Buffalo, N. T., pertaining to 
the branch cigar factory- of the San Telmo Co. 
at Buffalo. 

We find the San Telmo Cigar Company's 
factory number is 990. First District of Michi- 
flran, and that their ci«».r factories are located 
at 640 Forest avenue. East, and Michigan ave- 
nue and S5th street, Detroit (non-union shops). 

The reverend gentlemen made the statement 
that he had no stock in the San Telmo Com- 

ÎAny and stated that the cigar girls received 
rom 19.00 to $19.00, and sometimes S22.00 per 
week for their services, and that he Knew the 
San Telmo Ciflrar Co.'s shops were good places 
to work and that the erirls received rood wa^es, 
had good hours and that shop conditions were 
good. In fact, that his people were well taken 
care of. 

He made the statement that he wrote a letter 
for Mr. Rosenberger, one of the largest owners 
of the San Telmo Cigar Company, introducing 
him (Rosenberser) to other men of the doth 
of BufCalo for the purpose of helpinsr him to get 
srirls to work in the San Telmo non- 
union branch cigar factory in Buffalo. He was 
strongly in favor of girls working in the 
branch of the San Telmo Ciçar Company. He 
stated that he had not been In Buffalo in three 
years, but said, however, that one of his assist« 
ants had been in Buffalo in the interest of the 
San Telmo Cisrar Co. branch. 

Your committee informed him that the Cigar- 
makers' Union No. 2 of Buffalo waa 100 per 
cent orsanised, which meant that all cigar 
makers oelong to the union and that all the 
cigar manufacturers of Buffalo conducted union 
shops and employed all union men. also that 
there were no girls employed in making cigars 
in that city and that the cigar manufacturers of 
Buffalo pay better wages, averaging from 11.00, 
$2.00 and $8.00 per thousand above the bill of 
prices in effect by Union No. 22 of Detroit. 

The committee presented the reverend gentle- 
man with Union No. 22 bill of prices and showed 
him that the non-union San Telmo Comi>any 
was payinfir just about one-half of this amount 
to the girls in their employ, and explained to 
him that the bill of prices of Union No. 22 was 
the lowest in effect in the state of Michisran. 

Your committee then called his attention to 
the "Wage Slave Certificate" of the San Telmo 
Cigar Co. and we hereby present the same: 

wage slave certificates showing where half 
grown girl labor receives one dollar per week 
for making cigars at the San Telmo Cigar 
Manufacturing Company's factory No. 990. 
First District of Michigan, on the front and 
back of cigar box, at 640 Forest avenue. East; 
the other shop comer of Michigan avenue and 
86th street. Go up in that neighborhood and 
see for yourself, when these poor children are 
coming from or going to work. 

No. 

SAN TELMO CIQAR MFO. CO. 

Detroit, Mich., February 9th, 1910. 

On Saturday, August 18th, 1910, we hereby 

agree to pay — $1.00. One 

and no/100 dollars. 



22 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL • JOURNAL 



On condition that our pay roll books show 
that she has worked steadily in our factory for 
a period of 6 months from the date of this cer- 
tificate. 

SAN TELMO CIGAR MFG. CO. 
By E. J. Newell, Secy. 

Payable at our office. 

The fault is not at all with these poor chil- 
dren. They are Tictlms of circumstance. 
Wage Slave Certificate. 

Wage slavery girls wanted at the Ban Telmo 
non -union, cigar factories. 

They are trying very hard to conceal from 
you the fact that the girl catchers are after 
your daughter. 

Their brutal prosecutions have covered the 
cheeks of men, women and children with tears. 

They are looking back to the slavery days 
when they gave the workers lashes upon the 
naked back— in those days, legal tender for 
labor performed. , _^„ 

There will come a time when the chains will 
be broken. 

We, the committee, are very sorry to make 
this statement to the "real men and women*' 
who have the interest of little children at heart, 
and are against the employment of child labor, 
that: 

The reverend gentleman apparently approves 
of the employment of children in the S|an 
Telmo non-union shops. 

His answer to questions put to him in re- 
gard to this matter, was that the Interest of 
the San Telmo Company must not be interfered 
with by "labor unions" and that the "owners" 
of these shops must be "protected." 

He did not protest against this "wage slave 
certificate," and favored children working under 
theae bad non-union conditions. This was an 
awful shock to your committee when he went 
on record with his views as above stated. 

Your committee during this labor conference 
called his attention to the system whereby 
these cigar girls are "fined" (some call it taxed, 
others docked), and presented the following 
appeal:' 

An Appeal to All Real Men and Women. 

Have you lost that common touch for human 
rights? Girls and married women tell stories of 
being "taxed." some call it "docked," from 26 
cents to 13.00 per week if they ¿Etil to get 
enough cigars out of their tobacco. And they 
most all get docked because they can't beat the 
owners' system. Just think of these 
slavery conditions in this "land of the free and 
home of the brave." About 7.000 work under 
these bad conditions 52 weeks in the year and 
year after year receiving beggarly wages. Why, 
they don't get enough to eat, but we find the 
wives and daughters of these money- mad own- 
ers riding in soft cushioned automobiles and 
living in magnificent hotels and houses. They 
are not shedding tears pertaining to the brutal 
treatment handed out oy their husbands and 
fathers to the slaves of fear in these cigar 
traps. 

A foreman in the Hemmeter Cigar Co.'s fac- 
tory. No. 886, First District of Michigan loca- 
tion, has taken 700 cigars in one week off a 
girl's cigar table without pay. The foreman 
said the cigars were all right and the firm sold 
them. This means labor practically for noth- 
ing. These half-grown girls and married 
women say that the foremen in these different 
non-union cigar traps have taken from 20 to 
30 cigars some days, telling these slaves of fear 
the cigars were taken because of bad work- 
manship.. The cigars were sold Just the same. 
Seven thousand of these unprotected girls work 
under these bad conditions 62 weeks in a year 
making thousands of cigars free every week 
and are supported by smokers in Detroit and 
"land of the free and home of the brave" who 
do not give a thought to the slavery conditions 
under which the cigars they smoke are made. 

Does this system of "taxing and docking" 
the cigar girls meet with the endorsement of 
the reverend gentleman who stated "the manu- 
facturers of tobacco must be protected, and 
they, the owners, should know how many cigars 
could be liotten out of the tobacco." lie 
said the cigar girls had nothing to lose but the 



San Telmo owners had all to lose. Can you 
beat It? 

Your committee gave him all the faets and 
information pertaining to the employment of 
girls at the tender age of 14 years, packing 
cigars, and compelled to remain standing for 
a period of ten hours per day, and told him 
we would submit affidavits proving that they 
are compelled to stand in order to pack cinrs, 
and that some of these girls receive from |3.00 
to $4.00 per week, others 16.00 and |6.00 per 
week for their services. 

He finally said he would try and give the 
matter his attention when he had the time. 

The committee called his attention to the 
fact that Union No. 22 was in favor of organ- 
izing the women cigarmakers and take tnem 
into the union, and that the women would re- 
ceive the same wages as the men. We told 
him that Union No. 22 stands for the educa- 
tion of the child in our schools, and not as 
wage slaves in their youth in cigar factories. 
He would make no promise to give his support 
to Union 22 of Detroit, Mich., and Union No. 2 
of Buffalo, N. Y.. and said he would not advise 
his people to belong to labor unions. 

It is your right to know the facts regarding 
the labor conference with the reverend gentle- 
man and it is the duty of your committee to 
report them as we found them. 

Respectfully submitted and signed by the 
Committee of Detroit Federation. 

Adopted by the Detroit Federation of Labor. 
Wednesday, Jan. 8. 1913. 

(Signed) A. L. Olds, Henry Kummerfeld, 
Frank Parla to, David S. Jones. 

> 

REPORT OP INTERNATIONAL 
FINANCIER. 

Havana, lU., March 8, 1913. 

Since last report have examined the accounts 
of the following unions, vis.: 

(While in St. Louis I examined the accounts 
of the J. A. B. and the Local Fund accounts 
of No. 44.) 

Union 38, Sprinofleld, 111. 

The books and accounts here are In very nice 
condition. Day book accounts splendidly bal- 
anced at the end of each month. Ledger cor- 
rectly balanced. Benefit cards and endorsed 
vouchers on file: $77.00 was deposited in bank 
March 4th, leaving $19.80 in possession of the 
treasurer at time of examination. Section 177 
was called to the attention of the members in 
my report entered in the day book and the 
necessity of replacing their deficiency. State- 
ment as follows: 

Balance for Dec. 1, 1908 $ 2,722.09 

Receipts to March 1. 1913 9,068.11 

Expended over percentage in 1908-9- 
10 and 1911 476.51 

Total 112,266.71 

Expense to March 1, 1918 11,066.01 



Balance would be March 1, 1913 $ 1,190.70 

Funds of Union — 
March 1, 1918, in First Trust 

and Sav. Bank $652.31 

In possession Treas. C. J. Gass- 

, 1er 66.80 

In possession Sec. H. Bogas- 

ke 60.69 

Total 669.80 



Deficiency of union March 1. 1913 $ 630.90 

I failed to verify the $19.80 in possession of 
the Treasurer — simply overlooked it. 

No. 44, St. Louis, Mo. 
Benefit cards and vouchers endorsed by who- 
ever receives the money, on ille. In the ro- 
tation in which the items are entered for all 
expense, catsh and stamp aocounts, O.K., 
ledger and day book also balanced. The man- 
ner in which the receipts and expenditures are 
made up and verified by the finance commit- 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



23 



tee at th« time the report is made up is cer- 
tainly nice work. The secretary-treasurer 
gives a complete report of receipts and expen- 
ditures up to the time of each meeting. This 
means International, Local and J. A. B. meet- 
ings and accounts. The members here have a 
chance to know how the finances of the organ- 
isation, in all its parts, stand at all times. The 
financial affairs of this union are well handled. 
Statement as follows: 

Balance for Nov. 1, 1908 $ 8,832.86 

Receipts to Feb. 1, 1918 85,809.15 

Due to International Union on exam- 
ination 10.70 

Total 189.652.71 

Expenditures to Feb. 1, 1913 86,196.47 

Balance would be Feb. 1, 1913 !$ 3.456.24 

Funds of union — 
Feb. 1, 1913, in German Sav. 

Bank $2,896.84 

Feb. 1. in Miss. Valley Trust 

Co 600.00 

In possession Secretary-Treas- 

Ed. H. Heilman 48.70 

Total $ 3,445.54 



^"ollowT- **°^ Section 67 reads: Statement as 

RATo^/e'îl' 5ri»V«í" » ¡fill 

^^^^^on 7gçjj 

„ Total « g Q2ň il 

Expense to Feb. 28. 1913 ../.'/.'.. 7,116.80 



Deficiency of union Feb. 1. 1913 $ 10.70 

This deficiency is the amount due Interna- 
tional Union on examination and is $10.70 ille- 
gal sick benefit paid during December, 1912, 
and January, 1913. 

No. 114, Jacksonville, III. 

The books and accounts here are in very fair 
order. Benefit cards and endorsed vouchers 
for expense all on file. Ledger correctly in- 
dexed and posted. The finance committee really 
do their work here. Included in the amount 
due to International Union on examination is 
a correction of $1.15 in the interest account. 
There has been a surplus over the amount 
claimed in bank, according to their reports; 
also corrected small difference in the stamp 
account.' Statement as follows: 

Balance for Nov. 1. 1908 $6,760.17 

Receipts to March 1. 1913 16,450.97 

Expended over percentage in 1910 and 

1911 69.95 

Due to International Union on exam- 
ination 3.55 

Total $23,274.64 

Expense to March 1, 1913 $22,076.57 



Balance should be March 1, 1913...$ 1.198.07 
Funds of union — 

March 1, 1913, Jacksonville 
National Bank $660.51 

March 1, 1913, interest account 
in NaUonal Bank 462.44 

March 1, Ayers" National Bank. 2.16 

In i>o8session Sec'y L. P. Hoff- 
man 45.61 

Total ."! $ 1,170.72 



Deficiency of union March 1, 1913..$ 27.35 
This statement and deficiency for March 1, 

1913, does not include the amount expended 

over percentage during year 1912. 

No. 250, Belleville, III. 

The books and accounts here are in much 
better condition than this report indicates. An 
honest effort to have everything right. Cash 
and stamp accounts now correct. ledger cor- 
rectly indexed and posted. The deficiency is 
caused by having paid illegal benefits. Quite 
a few of the members here are slow in pay- 
ing dues. Sections 73, 106, 7, 8 and 9 will be 
better followed or some members of this local 



^ F?inds o^f^" nio^nii^""'' '' ^''^' "'^ ^«»'^^ 
Anarch 1, 1913. In Belleville 

Sav. Bank |286 23 

Certificate of deposit in Belle - 

ville Sav. Bank soo.OO 

In possession of Sec.-Treas. 

Henry Wilhelm 46.24 

■^otaï $ 831.47 



Deficiency of union March 1, 1913 $ 78 00 

.Jt?A^^^^ stated, this is illegal benefits re- 
ceived by members. 

No. 281, 8t. Louis, Mo. 

««^«^iS°°5* 5?*? accounts of this union are in 
splendid condition. Benefit cards, endorsed 
vouchers, etc., on file for every iťem of ex- 
pense. Cash and stamp accounts correct: cor- 
rect work. Statement as follows: 

Balance on hand for Nov. 1, 1908 $ 716.87 

Receipts to Feb. 1, 1913 2 228 32 

Over percentage for 1908 and 1911 ' 2¿43 

^Total I 2.961.62 

Corrected expense to Feb. 1, 1913 2,831.82 



Balance should be for Feb. 1, 1913...$ 147.80 
Funds of union — 
Feb. 1, 1913, in Mississippi 

Valley Trust Co. Bank $133.47 

Feb. 1, 1913, in German Sav. 

Bank ....... 10.97 

In possession Sec-Treas. Sam 

Baldwin 3.3$ 

Total $ 147.80 

No. 365, Havana, III. 
The books and accounts here are in fair or- 
r®*** ^Vouchers for expense all on file. Some 
benefit cards missing. Corrected snuUl differ- 
ence in the cash account, also in the stamp ac- 
count by entering item in the receipts for 
March, 1913. Statement as follows: 

Balance for May 1. 1909 $ 879.21 

Receipts to March 1, 1913 2,246.95 

Due to International Union on exam- 
ination 1.80 

Total .$ 2,626.96 

Expense to March 1, 1913 2,164.97 

Balance for March 1, 1913 7$ 161.99 

Funds of union — 
March 7, 1913, in Havana Natl. 

, Bank $137.36 

In possession of Sec. T. B. Dris- 

ko 22.32 

Total ."; 159.68 

Deficiency of union March 1, 1913...$ 2.81 

No. 431, Litchfield, III. 

Books and accounts in very fair condition 
here. Benefit cards and vouchers for expense 
all on file. Cash account correct. Corrected a 
surplus in the stamp account. Called the at- 
tention of the secretary to the necessity of 
having the year given on each ledger page, 
showing the members entitled to the 16 weeks' 



u 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



limit In dues when on the 90-day limit, when 
off the llmll. Also the members not entitled 
to benefltB becauBS of failure to comply with 
Sections 100-107, and how to balance each mem- 
ber's dues account with every credit given, also 
to balance the accounts at the end of each 
month In the day book. Statement &■ tollowa: 

Balance lor Nov. I. 190! » l,îT0.4T 

liecelpts to March I, 1313 4.S66.5S 

Total .t M3T.02 

Expenditure« to March 1, 1913 G,S63.9T 

Balance for March 1, 1913 t 383.06 



Fund« Of union- 
March 1, 1913, In Lltchfleld Nat. 

Bank 1169. 10 

In Litchfletd Bank and Trust 

Co ÎÏ8.94 

In possession Sec-Treaa. 

Chauncy Berry 01 

Total ~. I 388. 9S 

Tour« Fraternally, 

W. A. CAHPBBU:., 
International Fln«MCl«r. 



OFFICIAL 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

G. W. PERKINS, Preildent. 

Munon BulIdLnR, Chicago. 
SAMUEL. GÜIIPERS. Box 30. New York Clly, 

First Vice-President. 
THOMAS F. TRACT, 11 Appleton St., Boston, 

Maes.. Second Vice-President. 
A. QARtEPY, 239 Ave. Hotel De VIUo, Montreal, 

Canada, Third Vice- President. 
W. U. FITZGERALD, 799 Division St., Portland, 

Ore.. Fourth Vice-President. 
L. P. HOFFMAN. D3i ïteid St., Jacksonville. 

III., Firth Vlee-Prealdent. 
JOHN REICHERT. Brisbane Hall, Milwaukee, 



Wis., 
E. G. 



, Philadelphia. Pa., 

NOTICE TO LOCAL UNIONS. 
Iisn applying for retiring cards rtad \ 



UNION 


BUSINESS 




nslltu- 
















'lizr'""- 




office of the Internationa! 




2. Buffalo »"■ 




'. Ia Crosse... 


























16. Chicago 






60.00 


















































































































49. gjrlnsflcld . . 


































I. El Paso 


60.00 




the ci 


>nitltutlon whei 


n your 












■B from the 30c 


lo Ihp 












>e unie 








lotlfylns the offlc« of the death of a 
r member consult Section 149 and 
1th same, and If th« member has a 
sited send It Bioag wltb the nottficB- 
ake a record of all necessary Informa- 
OD for future reference- 



delays, mistakes, e 



:, enter loans 



, N., Uinneapolla, 
r St., Station 



10 the International Union. 



International Auditor's Seml-Annual Raport. 
We, the undersigned, do hereby cartl^ that 
we have examined the books, vouchers, accounts 
and bank statements of the International Preal- 
dent, a. W. Perkins, all Item« of expense and 
receipts, and And them all true and correct In 
every respect, sanie being: from September I. 
1912, to March 1. 1913., 
Receipts- 
September 1912 tt.TT4.9g 

October. 191! G,*T«.96 

November, 181Ï «,101.69 

December, 1912 6,244.11 

January, 1918 4,119.12 

February, IBIS 6,174.91 

Total tZB.SflG.tG 

Balance Sept. 1, 1912 1,187.89 

Grand total tSl,S8I.Ge 

E^xpenditures — 

September, 1912 t 8, Sil. SO 

October, 191Ï T.OTS.SE 

November. 191! 4.846.40 

December, 191! B.173.S3 

January. 1913 3,111.28 

February, 1913 6,14T.0T 

Total 180.038.04 

Balance March. 1913 l,41T.6l 

Grand total ttl,BSI.66 

Respectfully submitted, 

J, E, scniAUirauT, 

Union 808, Munde, Ind. 
EDWARD RUB, 

Union 174, Jollet, m. 
W. J. UVINGS, 
Union 269, Bloom inston, DL 
Auditor«. 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



25 



DECISIONS OP PRESIDENT 

James J. Peeney appealed against Ix>cal 486. 
New Westminster, for recognizing an expense 
for flowers created by the secretary without 
an order of the union. The appeal was sus- 
tained. 

F. X. Becherer appealed aganist Local 44. 
St. Louis, for falling to allow his claim for 
$40. The appeal was not sustained. 

D. B. Kaufman et al. appealed against Local 
129. Denver, for compelling all members seek- 
ing Jobs to report to the secretary and go 
to the foot of the list. The appeal was not 
sustained. This, however, does not debar a 
member who has employment from seeking 
employipent In another factory. Any member 
has a right to improve his condition if he so 
desires. 

M. Misner appealed against Local 46. Grand 
Rapids, for compelling him to deposit $25 for 
further use of the label for asking a member 
to work below the bill of prices. The appeal 
was not sustained. 

Josef Jlndela, Fanny Franz, Anna Prazak, 
Anna Vladyka, Barbara Pospíšil, Barbara Lin- 
hard and Barbara Stasny appealed against 
Union 90, New York, for expelling and fining 
each $25 for working in a struck shop in 
New York. That part of the action of the 
union In fining them ^$25 each is sustained. 
That part expelling them from the union for 
refusing to come out and stay out of the struck 
shop was not sustained. However, the decision 
is, further, that these appellants be permitted 
to rejoin as new members. 

M. 8. Brandon appealed against 97 Boston 
for suspending him for non-payment of dues. 
The appellant shows the suspension was caused 
by the accidental misplacing of due stamps in 
his card of membership. For this reason the 
appeal was sustained. 

O. C. Ware appealed against 111 Des Moines 
for fining him for failing to parade labor day. 
The appellant shows that he had never pa- 
raded because of physical disability. The ap- 
peal was sustained. 

A. Schoenwlrth appealed against 213 New 
York for recognizing certain ballots in the last 
general election of officers. The appeal was 
not sustained. 

A. O. Knorr appealed against 20 Decatur, 
m., reference action in the manner of electing 
delegates to the Trades and Labor Assembly. 
The appeal was not sustained. 

Paul Zwimer appealed against 83 Nashville 
for compelling him as flnanďal secretary to pay 
an excess of $9.05 in railroad fare to the dele- 
gate to the Baltimore convention. The appeal 
was sustained. 

C. H. Henneroann appealed against 60 Keo- 
kuk for fining him 26c for missing two special 
meetings. Appellant claims the local by-laws. 
Section 10, Article 22, provides that if a special 
meeting is called the secretary shall notify all 
shop collectors and each shop collector notify 
the members of the shop in which he is col- 
lector. The union replied that the regular 
meeting called the special meeting and that no 
further action reference notifying shop col- 
lectors and members was necessary in such a 
rail for a special meeting. The decision is that 
it Is necessanr for the secretary to notify shop 
collectors and members of the special meeting 
whether it is called by petition or ordered by a 
regular meeting, and that if this was not done 
the fine Imposed on Mr. Hennemann is not 
binding. If the secretary did not notify the 
shop collectors and the shop collectors, the 
members, and Mr. Hennemann was not at the 
regular meeting when the special meeting was 
ordered then his appeal is sustained. If he 
was at the regular meeting or otherwise of- 
fidaUy knew of the special meeting then he Is 
subject to the fine or failure to attend. 

A. Bentler et al., jurisdiction members, ap- 
pealed against 431 Litchfield for compelling 
them to p*7 local assessment of which they 



were» given no notice nor- an opportunity -to 
vote upon. The appeal was sustained. 

F. Bertram appealed against 105 Maysville for 
not permitting him to pack some unpacked 
cigars which were on hand when the men were 
laid off. The appeal was sustained. 

J. V. Lang appealed against 4 Cincinnati for 
suspending nim for non-payment of dues. The 
appeal was not sustained. 

I. Katz appealed against 138 Newark for re- 
fusing his claim for additional sick benefit. 
The appeal was not sustained. 

A. Escórela appealed against 128 El Paso for 
fining him $25 for allowing himself to be sus- 
pended. Mr. Escórela shows that he went from 
El Paso to Mexico and was unable to obtain 
employment or to keep himself in good stand- 
ing. The fine of $25 for allowing himself to be 
suspended under these circumstances is re- 
scinded. The appeal was sustained. 

W. H. Coney appealed against 225 Los An- 
geles for refusing his claim for further victim- 
ization benefit. The appeal was not sustained. 

W. M. Färber appealed against 1 Baltimore 
for fining him $50 for working In non-union 
shops. The appeal was not sustained. 

E. Wise appealed against 44 St. Louis for 
fining him $25. The appeal was not sustained. 

M. Schuman appealed against 97 Boston for 
suspending him for non-payment of dues. Ow- 
ing to extenuating circumstances the appeal 
was sustained. 

D. Cartoof appealed against 97 Boston for 
suspending him for non-payment of dues. Ow- 
ing to extenuating circumstances the appeal 
was sustained. 

M. Petzold appealed against 499 Trinidad for 
refusing to refund fine paid for non-attendance 
at meeting. The appeal was not sustained. 

L. Markowitz appealed against 225 Los An- 
geles for suspending him for non-payment of 
dues. The appeal was not sustained. 

M. Duffy appealed against 46 Grand Rapids 
for refusing to accept his application for mem- 
bership. The union replied that It had re- 
scinded its action, consequently no cause for 
action. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR FEB- 
RUARY, 1913. 

RECEIPTS. 
TAX. 



2. 

5. 
12. 
16. 
20. 
22. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
31. 

35. 
37. 
39. 
46. 
48. 
49. 



53. 
2.'Î9. 
124. 
Ï26. 
220. 

81. 
283. 
inR. 
3«8. 



Buffalo $200.00! 53. 

Rochester .. 20O.00!]94. 
Oneida 200.001200. 



Binghamton. 100.00 

Decatur 200.00 

Detroit 100.00 



201. 
205. 
211. 
214. 
242. 
250. 



Muskegon . . 
Milwaukee . 
So. Norwalk. 
Toronto .... 
Westfleld ... 
ConnersvlUe. 
Indianapolis. 

Dayton 1OO.O0I296. 

Fort Waxne. 200.001297. 
New Haven. 200.001298. 
Gr'nd Rapids 200.001315. 

Toledo 200.001341. 

SiDrlngfleld.. 200.001371. 



100.00 

200.00 

100.00 

200.001258. 

200.00270. 

100.001283. 

200.001286. 



New Orleans. 

Cayey 

Galesburg ... 
Rock Island. 
Battle Creek. 

Victoria 

Bluff ton 

York 

Belleville 

Streator 

Ft. Dodge 

Geneva 

Wichita 

Wilmington. . 

Canton 

Glens Falls.. 

St. Cloud 

Neenah 

Barre 



$100.00 
50.00 
50.00 
.'»O.OO 
.»iO.OO 
49.80 
50.00 

200.00 

100.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 

100.00 
50.no 
50.00 
50.0n 

100.00 
50.00 
60.00 



BOOKS 

Rochester . . . 
New Orleans. 
Bloomington . . 
Watertown . . 

Ephrata 

New Orleans. 
Peekskin .... 

Genova 

OcrdonsburíT . 
S.-icramonto . 



AND VOUCHERS. 

$1.501162. Green Bay.. 

. .751348. Corning 

.501186. Flint 

161. Denver 

33. Indianapolis 
Urbana . . . . 
SellersvIUe . 
Cedar Rapid 
Pontine .... 
Portland . . . 



.^0 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 



43. 

50 14 hi! 
401403. 
no '4 70. 



s. 



.$ .25 

. .50 

. 1.50 

. 1..50 

. .50 

. .50 

. .50 

. 1.00 

. .50 

. 1.00 



STATIONERY. 

102. Kansa.s City...$3.50'lO2. Kansas Citv...$3.50 

189. Phoenix 3. .501 34. Chippewa Falls 1.75 

2. Buffalo 7.001371. Barre 1.75 

26. So. Norwalk.. 1.75 



CIGAR MAKERS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



I. ClnciiiDa.tl . 
I. Clnclnnall . 



DEATH BENEFIT PAID, 



Dal 



Number, initial 

. . :iS02 May. 

. . 2 ses May, 

July. 

May. 
May. 
Mar.. 



Mar., 
July' 



MONTH OF JAh 
Mngth 

of Unio 



By metu ber - 
.- Jníon ahlp. 
ilDD. No. Tre.lloi. Cause ol death, Abi 



"■ r.- -.-.-.- 



Sept,, 

Î.' HäänibaS"7..W, DukeB"(w"lfě) ŠB286 Mai,'.' 
I. Mlnneapolli w. Stetttienson. , T6336 Seut 
r. Brooklyn . = uriiiio™. iwi/.i kiiík "/írl- 
r. Brooklyn ., 
!. Brooklyn . , 
). Now Tork., 
). New York.. 
Î, Worcester . 
I. Boston 



(wife) B7565 Aug.".' 

h' FoBBum T905 ADrlt 

S. Edelschem 88052 \far 

.M.Bukofier(wlfB) B7106 Aurl!. 

O, O. Schomburg ÏST18 Bent 

J. Brittan 111730 juS» 

J.HinB8ton (wife) 16B63 June 

™. ,.P. KÍelneman... 2555 June 

Washington PJDahlerJmother) 26151 July, 



102. KanBaa City.? 



I. Jacksonville Wm. Arbogast.. 114570 _^ 

I. Denver Joseph Kroeger. B1689 Sevt 

' • Clty.Mauřlce Welner. 426* Aug, 

— -^harleB Tuck B676I Feb 

benjamin Neagle 178« pec 

I. Steldl 114460 Nov.. 



:. Brooklyn 
;. Rkhmona . 
I. Appleton . . 
!■ Hudson . , . 
Î. Newark ,,. 

I.' i«ñg"Hin.'; 
. New York.. 
;. New Torlt., 
. New York.. 
I. Brooklyn . . 
I. Brooklyn , . 
>. Mllford .-.. 
. Ft, Colllr 



.. . 26257 __„ 

a. Meyer (wife) 21088 Mar. 

Louis E, Barth.. 83BT4 May, 

M, F. Troxel.... Î717T May, 

K.Vep rek (mother) BSOll June. 

J. Poons (wife) 4S296 July, 

W. Wolf ¡wife) 91181 Feb.. 

Jacob Litt (wife) ST233 Oct., 

Conrad DrocU... 113746 April 

N. Bonneville... 74S78 Aug. 



I. Philadelphia H. Kaiser (wife) 3S27B April, 

;. Philadelphia H. Beyer (wife) 63957 May 

'. Covington ..B. Meyer 10174B Nov.. 

'. Covington ..R. Anslead 70,142 Oct.. 

I. Grand Island Willi am Morvec Bn213 Nov , 

I. Rome Robert Crowell.. 77636 July, 

I. New York... 

i, Jtoa Angeles. J. P. (^ode S0342 Julv, 

', S anFranclsco George Nuss 7773 Nov. 

i, Reading Annie Baker 43313 Dec, 

1. Sacramento. M. C. Isaacs 49377 Mar 

I. Norfolk R. E. I,. Wood.. 71115 May. 

:, York IT. A. Uoyd B4805 Oct. 

I, Harrldbtirg. E.Wlse (mother) 38174 April, 

'. New Torlc.M. LeBko 11343» Mar.. 

'. New Torl(...N. Oberländer... 66364 June, 

!, Waverly J.J.Smith (wife) 7479B Jan., 

1. tîeneva A, Ebaon 61379 July. 

!, McBberryt'n Rose C. Klunk.. 9S4S9 April, 

I. Cornlnit J.Doherfy (wife) 37997 K..pt.. 

<. Mansl! Nicola» Pou fiB12 Ort., 

1. WaTlarB P. A. Hill 40177 J,in., 

I. I.ltchfleld ...i;. V. Rnab 81(IB6 Mnv. 

I. Faribault ...J-Riirmei.sleriwffc) BT Jlüir., 

I. r. Glmrrteaii Kd. Klug ino;M Auc. 

!. Petoskv R. F. Sleflin 



'. Bayamln J.IÎoilrluueïlwirc) 

I. Merlden Fred Meyer 

I. Tampa Josefina Valentl. 



3103 



iepl.. 



1894 4 IS 



I8S2 B 24 



ItOS 383 10 II 



S8a 10 30 



Accident . 
Tuberculosis , . 

Fat. deg. of ha 
Heart trouble.. 
Apoplexy ...... 

Tuberculosis , , 
I Heart trouble., 
failure. 



mllUtlS.. 61-8 100, 



¡890 32 22 10 Kidney ti 



1892 SS 21 



S79 68 32 



.894 111 IS 



- ..BumoDla 64 

Balance 

Comp, of diseases 71 

Aff. of orlst glands 72 

Pneumonia 84 

Grippe 41 

Paralytic stroke. , 72 



Ulcer, of stomach ' 



900 165 12 3 Kldne 

.883 90 '— — 

S93 15« 29 



77 AleohollBm . 

56 34 Pneumonia . 

110 La grippe , . 

Biu 114 2 î Nicoline po'- 

886 1S9 !6 3 Cancer of !._. 

830 133 32 4 Parapallgla . 



! bladder 55 E50. 



Tuberculosis B4 

Coreumplton 37 

ParalysÍH of brain BS 

Intestinal trouble 70 

6 Tuberculosis SO 

6 Heart disease 46 



893 53 19 



893 187 19 



.882 68 30 



Diabetes mlllltls. . 33 

Garcin, esophagus {16-10 50. 

Comp, of diseases 46 112, 

Cancer of stomach 48-11 40.' 

UrpmlB 80 40.' 

Nephritis 62 40. 

] Tuberculosis 39 3BÖ. 

Heart trouble 48 550. 

Briahfs dlseas«... S2 BSO. 

Bright's disease.-. 54 B50. 

200.1 

Angina pectoris,,, 72,^ "" 

He.irt Insui Bl 

Apoplexy 83 

; Heart trouble 61 

Pneumonia 42 iu. 

Chancer 53,11 5S0. 

Apoplexy 73 

Pul. phthisis 40. Í Bwi. 

. Pill, pbthlils 60. B 360. 

Consumption 4S 

' Pneumonia 77 non. 

' Tuberculosis 28 350. 

Lockjaw 40 40 

Tubercutosis 2E 

Accident Bl 

Pneumonia 53.1 

I Cancer stomach... flo 

Apoplexy 39 

Tublr^l^S '.'.'.'.'. 22 



CIGAR MAKEKS' OFFICIAL JOURNAL 



31 



Cigarmakers' Union a Paying Investment. 

In approaching cigarmakers for the pur- 
pose of inviting them to become members 
of the union we frequently meet those who 
insist, that although the Cigarmakers' In- 
ternational Union is a splendid organiza- 
tioil, it is too expensive at 30 cents a week 
dues. Now of course everybody knows that 
all organizations if they are to amount to 
anything must be properly ñnanced, and 
the cigarmakers' union is no exception to 
the rule. It provides a chain of beneñts 
for its members such as few organizations 
can boast of, and yet it is hard to con- 
vince many of the non-union cigarmakers 
in the ñrst and ninth districts of Pennsyl- 
vania, that besides the advantages to be ob- 
tained through collective effort in the way 
of increased wages and a shorter work day, 
that altogether aside from that phase of the 
question, the 30 cents a week paid in dues 
to the Cigarmakers' International Union is 
the best all around investment that any 
cigarmaker could possibly make. 

This is a very bold statement and may 
be challenged by some who have not had 
an opportunity to inform themselves con- 
cerning the benefit system maintained by 
the cigarmakers' union. If then, the state- 
ment just made can be verified by fact's 
and figures, then the purpose of this article, 
which is to present to all non-union cigar- 
makers whose attention may be directed 
to it, an unanswerable argument in favoi 
of the union, will have been accomplished. 
Here is the argument upon which we rest 
our case: 

Harry A. Loyd, a member of Cigar- 
makers' Union No. 242 of York, Pa., was 
initiated October 8, 1890. 

Died December 4, 1912. 

Length of membership, 22 years, 1 
month and 22 days. 
Paid 25c a week dues for 6 years, 2 

months and 16 days $ 8075 

Paid 30c a week dues for 13 years, 

1 month and 7 days 204.30 

Paid 20c a week dues for 2 years, 

9 months and 28 days 29.20 

Total paid as weekly dues $ 314.25 

Assessments amounting to 18.40 

Total amount paid in during 

membership $ 332.65 

Sick benefits drawn during term of 

membership $ 389.39 

Strike benefits drawn during term 

of membership 121.66 

Out of work benefits drawn during 

term of membership 29.50 



Total sick, strike and out of iwork 

benefits received $ 540.55 

Funeral benefit paid to his heirs.. 550.00 

Total benefits received .$1,090.55 

Paid in 332.65 

Benefits received over and above 
amount paid in $ . 757.90 



In a letter sent to J. W. Sanford, secre- 
tary of Union 129, Denver, Colo., Mr. Frank 
C. Stegman, secretary of Typographical 
Union No. 122, Kalamazoo, Mich., says, 
speaking of the American Playing Card, 
Kalamazoo, Mich.:, "I understand that the 
company in question has a type composing 
department, and that no union printer is 
employed in the same." While this office 
has absolutely nothing to do with the pur- 
chase of playing cards by any of our locals, 
showing a cut of our label, from the Ameri- 
can Playing Company of Kalamazoo, Mich., 
or from any other playing card company, 
the facts are that when the American Play-, 
ing Card Company of Kalamazoo first made 
the cards the pressmen were strictly union 
and no complaint was ever entered by any 
of the printing trades against this concern. 
There is practically no typesetting in con- 
nection with the making of playing cards. 
The cards are made from electrotype 
plates. While Secretary Stegman of the 
Typographical Union does not say that the 
pressmen employed by the company are not 
union, he objects to the printers' label ap- 
pearing on the cut. and from his letter we 
should judge that he considers the Ameri- 
can Playing Card Company of Kalamazoo, 
Mich., is not a strictly Union factory. 



A Cincinnati paper recently stated that 
cigar manufacturers of that city were find- 
ing serious difficulty in securing appren- 
tices for their shops. This article con- 
cerned the big non-union cheap John man- 
ufacturers. 

Several laughable reasons were advanced 
as the cause. We should judge, however, 
that the real cause is due to the fact that 
they are paid starvation wages while 
learning and arc given starvation wages 
when deemed sufficiently equipped to be 
called journeymen. 

After all it is only those who are in the 
most desperate social and economic condi- 
tions, and who by force of adverse cir- 
cumstances will seek employment in these 
big non-imion. cheap-labor cigarmaking in- 
stitutions.